Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement


Lesson Plans
K-2 Units 3-5 Units 6-8 Units 9-12 Units
Unit Title & Purpose Lesson Titles & Key Words

"We the People..." Project

Explore the motivations of founding fathers and the roles of government and philanthropy for sustaining a civil society. 

  1. Philanthropy of the Founding Fathers—Alive and Well Today?

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Public Policy; Social Action; Values
  2. Introduction of the "We the People..." Project and Volunteer Survey

    PHIL: Community; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Debate; Public Policy; Survey; Teamwork
  3. Identifying Career Interests in the Volunteer and Government Sectors

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Business; Government; Inquiry; Research

"I" on Philanthropy

Students will create a resource for the school library that lists information about the non-profit agencies and philanthropic opportunities in their own community. They will use interviewing techniques in order to create this resource. Students will reflect on the concept of philanthropic involvement shaping self-identity.

  1. Connecting Philanthropy and Identity through Children's Literature and Song

    ELA: Giving Tree (The); Brainstorming; Fiction Literature; Listening
    PHIL: Character; Community; Self Interest; Selflessness; Volunteer
    SOC: Nonprofit Organizations
  2. Academic Service Learning: Creating the Philanthropy Resource

    ELA: Interview; Questioning; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Donate; Service Learning
  3. Reflection on Philanthropy and Self Concept

    ART: Theater: Perform; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Fact/Opinion; Presentations; Reflection; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Reflection

Action through Art

The learners read stories written and illustrated by teens about action and advocacy to make the world a better place. The students brainstorm concerns/issues they have about their school or local community and create story outlines about ways to address an issue.

  1. Action through Art

    ELA: Brainstorming; Reading; Story Mapping; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Art from the Heart; Heroes
    SOC: Civil Society

Addressing Poverty (9th Grade)

The learners analyze why nonprofit organizations are needed, especially when for-profit and governmental institutions do some of the same work. They investigate a local nonprofit that works to alleviate poverty in the community and describe the importance of philanthropy in the community.

  1. Addressing Poverty

    ELA: Informational Genre; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Community; Homelessness; Poverty; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 6 genOn; Contemporary Issues; Economics; For-Profit; Goods and Services; Government; Nonprofit; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs

Advocacy-Getting the Job Done

Students learn about strategies and motivations for people to become advocates for a cause. They identify and research local, state, or national concerns for animal welfare.

  1. Understanding Advocacy

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Interview; Letter Writing; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Humanitarian; Kindness; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Service Project; Stewardship; Values
    SCI: Animals; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Ecosystems; Ethics; Nature
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues; Environment; Ideals/Reality; Nonprofit; Opportunity Costs; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action
  2. Understanding Effectiveness

    ELA: Biography; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Humanitarian; Kindness; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Values
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues; Environment; Ideals/Reality; Nonprofit; Opportunity Costs; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action
  3. “Getting our Paws into the Cause”

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Humanitarian; Kindness; Nonprofit Organizations; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Service Project; Stewardship; Values
    SCI: Animals; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Ecosystems; Ethics; Nature
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues; Environment; Ideals/Reality; Nonprofit Organizations; Opportunity Costs; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action

Affirmative Action

Explore the history of Affirmative Action in the United States from Plessy v. Ferguson 1869 to the present. Students read primary source documents, watch video, and explore recent Affirmative Action cases and relate this to the Core Democratic Values. They participate in a "mock" Affirmative Action Supreme Court case. 

  1. Order In The Court

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Media Genres; Research; Technology; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Fact/Opinion; Minorities; Philanthropic Act; Social Action
    SOC: Brown v. Board of Education; Plessy v. Ferguson; 1 genOn; Advocacy; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Discrimination; Economics; Government; Human Rights; Inquiry; Marshall, Thurgood; NAACP; Nonprofit; Persecution; Research; Supreme Court
  2. Little Rock, 1957

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fact/Opinion; Inquiry; Media Genres; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Fact/Opinion; Freedom; Minorities; Social Capital; Social Justice
    SOC: Brown v. Board of Education; 1 genOn; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Desegregation; Discrimination; Diversity; Equality; Government; Human Rights; Persecution; Supreme Court
  3. Affirmative Action At Work

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fact/Opinion; Inquiry; Media Genres; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Fact/Opinion; Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Steelworkers v. Weber; 1 genOn; 2 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Discrimination; Government; Human Rights; Persecution; Supreme Court
  4. Court So Orders (The )

    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Writing; Informational Media; Inquiry; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Research; Role-Play; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Fact/Opinion; Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 1 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Compare/Contrast; Constitution of the United States; Declaration of Independence; Government; Rule of Law; Supreme Court

Air Pollution and Asthma (11th Grade)

Students gain awareness of the negative effects of air pollution, especially asthma. Students identify some of the sources of air pollution in the school and community and possible ways to improve air quality in these areas.

  1. Air Pollution and Asthma (11th Grade)

    ELA: Informational Media; Prior Knowledge; Research; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Cause/Effect; Health; Pollution
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Environment; Health and Disease; Pollution

Air Today, Air Tomorrow

Students investigate resources and individuals who have knowledge about the effects of air pollution while determining what role each has played.  Students develop and implement a plan for distributing radon and carbon monoxide detectors to senior citizens and families in need, developing skills for becoming good stewards of the Earth. They gain awareness of Air Quality as an important environmental issue they have the power to influence.

  1. Take a Deep Breath

    ELA: Letter Writing; Point of View
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; Human Rights; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Responsibility; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Ethics; Pollution; Resources
  2. Start Cleaning the Air

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Point of View
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Plan; Service Project; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Air; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Ethics; Resources
  3. It's Never Too Late

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Communities; Environment; Ethics; Resources

All for One

Learners identify discriminatory behaviors and analyze the harmful effects of excluding groups of people. They research strategies for creating a more inclusive school and community to respect human dignity. They develop an action plan and present recommendations to adminstration and student government. This may be a good unit for raising awareness of respectful vocabulary and promoting rights of LGBTQ students.

  1. Don't Laugh at Me

    ELA: Journaling; Listening; Reading
    PHIL: Empathy; Reflection; Tolerance
    SOC: Yarrow, Peter; 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Diversity; Equality
  2. Living Together as One

    ELA: Journaling; Media Genres; Reflection; Universal Themes; Viewing
    PHIL: Discrimination; Human Rights
    SOC: 1 genOn; Bill of Rights; Discrimination; Diversity
  3. Who's In, Who's Out?

    ELA: Journaling; Survey
    PHIL: Community; Diversity
    SOC: 1 genOn; Communities; Diversity
  4. Allies and Actions

    ELA: Journaling; Presentations; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Minorities; Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Diversity; School Community
  5. We Can Help to Make a Change!

    ART: Presentations
    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Presentations
    PHIL: Advocacy; School Climate; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Advocacy; School Community

Art as Advocacy

The learners view works of art that advocate for social change. The learners select an issue of human rights and create a work of art that represents the issue. They write a paragraph of explanation about their work.

  1. Art as Advocacy

    ELA: Media Genres; Prior Knowledge
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Common Good; Hispanics; Human Rights; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Chávez, César; Huerta, Dolores; Good Character; Human Rights

Attributes of a Civil Society (9th Grade)

Learners define justice, kindness, peace, and tolerance and describe the importance of these attributes of a civil society. They will look for examples of their presence or absence in the news media and brainstorm how they can promote them in their school, community and the world.

  1. Attributes of a Civil Society (9th Grade)

    ELA: Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Kindness; Tolerance
    SOC: Democratic Values; Justice

Be the Change: Core Values

Students engage in a variety of activities that enable them to explore their identity and the responsibilities of citizenship. They reflect on the qualities of a leader and create and donate a children's book.

  1. Building Identity

    ELA: Concept Mapping; Constructing Meaning; Creative Writing; Poetry
    PHIL: Community; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Cultures
  2. Building a Community: Responsibility and Leadership

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Creative Writing; Journaling; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Community; Helping; Need; Social Action
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities
  3. Leadership and Service

    ELA: Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Creative Writing; Narrative Writing; Research
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities

Be the Change: Democracy

Students engage in activities that illustrate the importance of every person contributing his or her voice in a democratic community/society. They explore the connection between rights, laws, and voting in a democracy. They learn about their local government structure and visit a public office to collect data through interviews and observations. Students create a final project tying together their knowledge of voting, rights, laws, and public office.

  1. The Power of One

    ELA: Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Benefits; Justice
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civil Rights; Democratic Values; Voting
  2. Get Up, Stand Up

    PHIL: Advocacy; Community
    SOC: Be the Change; Branches of Government; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Democracy; Government; Laws; Representative Democracy
  3. E Pluribus Unum

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Communicate; Creative Writing; Symbols/Images/Sounds; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Social Action
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; democratic Values; Government; Laws; Local Government; Voting

Be the Change: Environment

Students explore environmental issues and discuss ways to take social action to raise awareness of environmental stewardship. 

  1. Trash Talk

    ELA: Letter Writing
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Global Community; Neighborhood; Service
    SCI: Environment; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Pollution
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Interdependence
  2. What Are You Drinking?

    ELA: Communicate; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Global Community
    SCI: Analyze; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Water
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities; Geography; Resource Allocation; Resources
  3. Good in the Hood

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Community; Justice; Neighborhood; Social Action
    SCI: Environment; Garden; Land Management; Natural Resources
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Compare/Contrast; Environment; Resource Allocation; Resources; Urbanization

Be the Change: Global Health

Students learn about three global health issues and ways to take local action to address the issues: sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), global hunger, and malaria.

  1. Prevention of STDs

    ELA: Communicate; Persuasive Techniques; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Advocacy; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Pro-Social Behavior
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Be the Change; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Contemporary Issues
  2. Hunger: Facts and Responses

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Communicate; Electronic Text; Poetry; Presentations; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: Advocacy; Service
    SOC: Be the Change; Cause/Effect; Geography; Global Issues
  3. Malaria

    ELA: Communication; Interview; Personal Response
    PHIL: Poverty; Service; Social Action
    SCI: Health; Malaria
    SOC: Be the Change; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Global Issues

Be the Change: Homelessness

Students learn about the issue of homelessness and take action to address the issue. Students examine their preconceptions and build on their understanding about homelessness, seeking to discover the actual facts and statistics about homelessness locally and nationally.

  1. Preconceptions

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Poetry; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Empathy; Homelessness; Sensitivity
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities
  2. The Facts

    ELA: Brainstorming; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Empathy; Homelessness; Needs Assessment; Sensitivity
    SOC: Be the Change; Geography; Maps/Globes
  3. What Can We Do: Taking Action

    ELA: Letter Writing; Presentation; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Philanthropy; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Homelessness; Reflection; Sensitivity; Volunteer
    SOC: Be the Change; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Nonprofit

Be the Change: Life Skills

The students engage in activities to help them examine time management and study skills. They learn the value and skills of budgeting and fundraising. They have the option to plan and implement a fundraising project for a nonprofit organization of their choice.

  1. Time Management

    ELA: Character Development; Vocabulary
    MAT: Estimation; Time
    PHIL: Character Education: Self-Discipline; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Be the Change
  2. Study and Test Taking Skills

    ELA: ; Constructing Meaning; Debate; Main Idea; Questioning; Reading; Response to Text/Others
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good
  3. Money Management

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    MAT: Estimation; Money
    PHIL: Enlightened Self-Interest; Fundraising
    SOC: Be the Change; Budget; For-Profit; Nonprofit

Be the Change: Personal Health

Students examine their own eating, sleeping, and exercise habits. They compare them to national health standards, and develop plans for improving them. Then they share their learning to promote a healthier community.

  1. You Are What You Eat: Show What You Know

    ELA: Electronic Text; Expository Writing; Informational Media; Persuasive Techniques; Questioning; Reading; Synthesizing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Be the Change; Business; Communities; Government; Nonprofit
  2. Give It a Rest!

    ELA: Journaling; Reading; Research; Self-Assessment
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities
  3. Move It or Lose It!

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Sensitivity; Service; Volunteering
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities

Be the Change: Violence

Students define violence and its causes through discussion and research. They consider ways in which they can be peaceful within a violent community and advocate for peace.

  1. Defining Violence: Your Community

    ELA: Vocabulary
    SOC: Be the Change; Social Capitol
  2. Violence: Bullying

    ELA: Interview; Reflection; Survey
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    SOC: Be the Change; Bullying; Discrimination; Social Capital
  3. Being the Change: Violence Against Women

    ELA: Peer Review; Presentations
    PHIL: Advocacy; Women
    SOC: Be the Change; Social Capital

Be the Change: Workplace Readiness

Learners investigate jobs in the nonprofit and for-profit sectors, and reflect on their own job related interests and skills. Students will create a resume, geared toward gaining employment in a particular field or job. They learn and practice skills needed for a successful job interview. Students may choose to plan and implement a "Job Skills Workshop" to share their new knowledge and skills with their peers.

  1. Resume and Cover Letter Tips

    ELA: Vocabulary
    SOC: Be the Change; Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. Hitting the Pavement and Sealing the Deal

    ELA: Interview; Nonverbal Communication; Questioning; Role-Play
    SOC: Be the Change; Career Opportunities
  3. Professionalism: Doing What Works

    ELA: Interview; Resume; Role-Play; Self Assessment
    SOC: Be the Change; Career Opportunities

Bullying Prevention Plan

Students define bullying and analyze the roles of the community. Students recognize that bullying is a civil rights issue that needs to be addressed to promote fairness and safety for all. They create a survey and poll members of their school and family communities. Youth utilize the persuasive power of oral writing and visual media as instruments of change.

  1. Bullying Is a Civil Rights Issue

    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Presentations; Research; Survey
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Conflict Resolution; Needs Assessment; Philanthropist; Respect; Responsibility; School Climate; Sensitivity
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Bullying; Civil Rights; Community Capital; Constitution; Family; Justice
  2. Civic Virtue and Public Policy

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Text; Informational Genre; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Civil Society; Minorities; Philanthropist; Responsibility; Social Action
    SOC: Bullying; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Common Good; History; Human Rights; Justice; Persecution
  3. Speaking for the Minority Voice

    ELA: Communicate; Informational Media; Presentations; Social Media; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Problem Solving; School Climate; Sensitivity
    SOC: Bullying; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; School Community

Careers and Nonprofit Organizations

Learners distinguish between nonprofit organizations and for-profit organizations. Through research and an interview, they investigate jobs and/or internships in the nonprofit sector, and reflect on their own job related interests and skills.They will identify and dispel some of the myths of nonprofit employment.

  1. Careers and the Nonprofits

    ELA: Reflection; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Career Opportunities; Community
    SOC: 8 genOn; For-Profit; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Research
  2. Nonprofit Interviews

    ELA: Interview; Personal Response; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Career Opportunities; Community; Mission Statement; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteerism
    SOC: 8 genOn; Inquiry; Research

Careers: Living and Working with Animals

Students explore making fulfilling career choices by focusing on careers with animals as examples. They research various careers with animals and share their findings. 

  1. Looking into Careers:
    Doing What I Like and Liking What I Do

    ELA: Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Career Opportunities; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Problem Solving; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues; Economics
  2. Career Advice

    ELA: Group Discussions; Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Career Opportunities; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Animals; Data Collection/Organization; Stewardship
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues
  3. Come to the Fair

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions; Peer Review; Presentation: Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Animals; Career Opportunities; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Reflection; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues

Challenging Social Boundaries

Stuents learn about historical incidents of race discrimination and public protest, drawing parallels to present day social barriers and the need for social action. Students define stereotype, discrimination, racism, and prejudice and brainstorm a social action plan to heal racism. Students organize a “Mix It Up Day!” with the intention of breaking down social and racial barriers in the school lunchroom.

  1. Power of Protest (The)

    ELA: Listening; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork; Understanding/Interpretation; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; African American; Civil Society; Commons; Discrimination; Empathy; Giving; Heroes; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Civil Rights; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Conflict Resolution; Discrimination; Equality; Good Character; Human Rights; Justice; Minorities; Parks, Rosa; Rights/Responsibilities; Rules; Tolerance
  2. Racism and the Box

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Reflection; Role-Play; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Discrimination; Reflection
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Racism; Segregation
  3. Getting Out of the Box

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Listening; Questioning; Reading
    PHIL: Altruism; Egoism; Respect; Self Interest; Selflessness; Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Consensus; Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity; Ethics; Minorities; Racism
  4. Power in Numbers

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Social/Cultural Issues; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Advocacy; African American; Board of Directors; Discrimination; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Advocacy; Amendments to Constitution; Civil Rights; Desegregation
  5. Mix It Up!

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Group Discussions; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Activism; Reflection; School Climate; Social Action; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Desegregation; School Community; Social Action

Civic Environmentalist: Rachel Carson (12th Grade)

Students learn about the impact one woman had on the world and our environment. Rachel Carson's advocacy is an example for them of how they can become civic environmentalists.

  1. Civic Environmentalist: Rachel Carson (12th Grade)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Good Character; Philanthropic Act
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Conservation; Ecology; Environment
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Disaster: Human-Made; Environment; Health; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Values

Civic Virtue in Modern American Democracy

Students explore characteristics of civic virtue, putting the common good above individual interests, in modern American society.

  1. What Is a Good Citizen? How the Textbook(s)
    Define Good Citizenship and/or Civic Virtue

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: Tocqueville, Alexis de; 9/11genOn; Common Good; Need
    SOC: Rousseau, Jean Jacques; 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Constitution of the Iroquis Nation; Good Character; Government; Personal Virtue; Roman Republic
  2. Developing a Personal Definition of Civic Virtue—e pluribus unum

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Reading; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes; Vocabulary; Writing Process
    PHIL: Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Declaration of Independence; Good Character; Government; Ideals/Reality; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Primary/Secondary Sources; Roman Republic
  3. Great Debate (The)—Do Americans Today Have Civic Virtue?

    ELA: Debate; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others; Thesis; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Advocacy; Analyze/Interpret; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Declaration of Independence; Good Character; Government; Ideals/Reality; Personal Virtue
  4. Ask the Experts—What Do Contemporary Surveys
    Tell Us About Americans and Civic Virtue?

    ELA: Bowling Alone; Analyze/Interpret; Debate; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others; Thesis; Universal Themes; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Fact/Opinion; Need; Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Declaration of Independence; Good Character; Ideals/Reality; Inquiry; Personal Virtue

Climate Change Challenge (12th Grade)

Students learn about climate change and greenhouse gas emissions. Students discuss the issue and motivations for giving for the common good. Through discussion and brainstorming, students establish things they can do personally and as a team to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. Climate Change Challenge (12th Grade)

    ELA: Informational Media; Reflection; Teamwork; Viewing; Visual Media
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Motivation for Giving
    SCI: Air; Environment
    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Consensus; Economics; Environment; State Government

Comics and Cartoons of a Civil Society (10th Grade)

Learners gain awareness of the attributes of justice, kindness, peace and tolerance in a civil society as they search for examples in political cartoons and newspaper comic strips. They create cartoons illustrating an aspect of civil society, and write a paragraph of explanation about their cartoon.

  1. Comics and Cartoons of a Civil Society (10th Grade)

    ELA: Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Kindness; Tolerance
    SOC: Democratic Values; Justice

Communities in Crisis (9-12)

Students learn about the Holocaust through primary and secondary sources. They identify philanthropic activities within their own community and state during the period of World War II. They discover the role of ongoing philanthropic institutions and grassroots actions in their community today.

  1. Primary Source? What is That? (9-12)

    ELA: Biography; Journaling
    PHIL: Altruism; Social Action; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl; 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Democracy; Human Rights; Primary/Secondary Sources; Values
  2. Giving Beyond Measure-- Diary of Anne Frank (9-12)

    ELA: Anne Frank: Reflections on Her Life and Legacy; Anne Frank Remembered; Compare/Contrast; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Writing Process
    PHIL: Ennobled Self; Sacrifice; Social Justice
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Ethics; World War II
  3. The Roles of Individuals in the Warsaw Ghetto

    ELA: Brainstorming; Research; Writing Process
    PHIL: Character; Human Rights
    SOC: 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Core Democratic Values; Reserved Powers; Timelines
  4. "Who Wants to Be an Octogenarian?" (A Service-Learning Activity) (9-12)

    ELA: Interview; Presentations; Reflection
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Sacrifice; Service Project
    SOC: Rosie the Riveter; 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Historical Biographies; Primary/Secondary Sources; World War II
  5. Philanthropy, A Timeline For Us (9-12)

    ELA: Peer Review; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Contribute; Donate; Foundations; In-Kind Contribution; Learningtogive.org; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Good Character; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Taxation

Creating Student-Generated Classroom Rules

Within the context of studying student rights and responsibilities in a school environment, students participate in the development of some classroom rules. After creating the rules, students maintain the rules through participation in a classroom council that will hear complaints and recommend needed changes. This unit addresses the philanthropic themes of public discourse and problem solving for the common good.

  1. Rights and Responsibilities of Students (The)

    SOC: Bethal v Fraser; Tinker v DesMoines; 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Bill of Rights; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Constitution of the United States; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Federal Courts; Freedom; Justice; Public Policy; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law; State Courts; Supreme Court
  2. Creating Proposed Classroom Rules

    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Freedom; Justice; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law
  3. Voting on the Classroom Rules

    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Freedom; Justice; Majority Rule; Parliamentary Procedure; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law; Voting
  4. Monitoring the Classroom Rules

    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Freedom; Justice; Majority Rule; Parliamentary Procedure; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law; Voting

Cultural Diversity in Service

This unit focuses on different traditions of giving through world cultures (and religious traditions), looking for similarities that connect us. In addition, learners recognize that diversity makes our community stronger. Students develop personal mission statements and create visual/audio presentations of "Why I Serve."  

  1. Observing First Impressions

    ELA: Communicate; Electronic Text; Knight scholarship; Listening; Reading; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Civil Society; Common Good; Reflection; Service
    SOC: 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Family; Stereotypes; Traditions; Values; Volunteerism
  2. Cultural Connections

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Knight scholarship; Main Idea; Reading; Reflection; Summarizing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character; Cultures; Diversity; Leadership; Mission Statement; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service; Traditions
    SOC: Carver, George Washington; Chávez, César; Edhi, Abdul Sattar; Bahuguna, Sunderlal; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Nonprofit
  3. Why I Serve

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Creative Writing; Knight scholarship; Listening; Presentations; Reflection; Technology; Viewing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Family; Mission Statement; Motivations for Giving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Diversity; Good Character

Dear Philanthropist

In this unit, learners conduct investigations to discover what motivated philanthropists from history to engage in their work. They present this information, both orally and in writing, creating a public or online display of that philanthropist's life and work.

  1. "Dear Philanthropist"

    ELA: Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research
  2. Research and Development

    ELA: Letter Writing; Presentations; Technology; Writing Process
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research
  3. "I Just Learned About the Coolest Person"

    ELA: Poetry; Presentations
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Historical Biographies
  4. "Dear Young Philanthropist"

    ELA: Letter Writing; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue

Disaster Relief - Power, Generosity and Leadership! (9-12)

Learners research problems caused by a natural disaster and cite examples of aid provided in an effort to help those devastated populations. They will investigate the role of the four economic sectors in responding to the needs. They will participate in a collection campaign and learn about organizations to which they can contribute their philanthropy.

  1. Disaster Relief - Power, Generosity and Leadership! (9-12)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 9/11genOn; Activism; Collections; Common Good; Community; Donate; Emergency Response; Fundraising; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Current Events; Disaster: Natural; Economics; Presidential Roles

Diverse Community: Who Is My Neighbor? (9-12)

Students view examples of media being used to promote responsibility and acceptance. They view YouTube videos that inspire them to make connections with people locally and globally. They learn about an artist who leaves free art in public spaces to raise optimism in tough times. They explore stereotypes and prejudices and create art to build connections with “neighbors.”

  1. Uniqueness and Prejudice

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Role-Play
    PHIL: Empathy; Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: Cultures; Discrimination; Diverse Communities; Diversity; Global Issues
  2. Connecting People Through Art

    ART: Dance; Visual Arts
    ELA: Communicate; Informational Media; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Advocacy; Global Community; Neighborhood; Stereotypes
    SOC: Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Global Issues
  3. Service to the Neighborhood

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Presentation
    PHIL: Advocacy; Neighborhood; Service; Social Action
    SOC: Common Good; Diverse Communities; Diversity

Don't Be Impervious to the Impermeable

This unit is about the impact of growth (commercial and residential) on the environment and the trade-offs we make for progress at the loss of nature. The purpose of this lesson is to make learners aware of the environmental impact of impervious surfaces and empower them to become environmental stewards.

  1. Whose Land Is It Anyway?

    ELA: Point of View; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Mission Statement; Reflection; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Critical Thinking; Earth Changes; Ecology; Natural Resources
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Environment; Natural Characteristics of Place; Population; Resources; Stewardship
  2. You Can't Escape the Landscape

    ELA: Poetry; Point of View; Writing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Land Management; Population Growth; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; Population; Transportation; Urbanization
  3. The Landscape, Leave It Better than You Found It

    ELA: Presentations; Research
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Environment; Environmental Stewardship; Symbiosis; Terrain; Water
    SCI: Environment; Symbiosis; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; Resources; Stewardship

Encouraging Volunteerism

Learners gain awareness that their active participation in community life (volunteering, elections, advocacy) makes their community and government stronger. They analyze through fables how characters reveal their values through their actions. 

  1. Story of Giving (A)

    ELA: Quilt Maker's Gift (The); Fable; Perception; Symbols/Images/Sounds
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Traditions; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 12 genOn; 8 genOn
  2. Citizen Participation

    PHIL: Community; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities
  3. Making Choices with Scarce Resources

    PHIL: Common Good; Opportunity Costs; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Costs; Economics; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity
  4. Nonprofits and Me

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Letter Writing
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; Foundations; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Cooperative Groups; For-Profit; Foundations; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteerism

Environment: Sustaining Our World (9-12)

The students compare and contrast natural and pavement groundcover. They define permeable and impermeable ground surfaces and discuss the merits of each in relationship to the environment. They define environmental stewardship and determine responsibility for caring for the environment. They analyze mission statments from environmental organizations and write their own personal mission statement. 

  1. Pavement or Dirt?

    SOC: Environment; Terrain
  2. They Paved Paradise

    SCI: Environment; Terrain
  3. Carefully Managing the Earth's Resources

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Peer Review; Personal Response; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Mission Statement; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Environment; Geography; Maps/Globes; Nonprofit

Environmental Groups and the Three Economic Sectors

Students explore how the three economic sectors--for-profitnonprofit, and government--each contribute differently to protecting environmental interests. They research organizations and determine their own personal level of commitment to environmental concerns. 

  1. Identify the Three Economic Sectors

    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Economics; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. Match the Environmental Group with the Correct Sector

    ELA: Listening; Media Genres; Presentations; Technology
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: Environmental Protection Agency; Greenpeace; National Park Service; World Wildlife Federation; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Economics; Environment; For-Profit; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Public Policy; Research
  3. Nonprofit Environmental Groups

    ELA: Listening; Media Genres; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Technology
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: Environmental Protection Agency; Greenpeace; National Park Service; World Wildlife Federation; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Economics; Environment; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Public Policy; Research

Finding Self in Community (11th Grade)

Learners explore the vocabulary of beliefs and values and relate that to roles they play in community. 

  1. Finding Self in Community (11th Grade)

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; Altruism; Community; Empathy; Motivation for Giving; Service Project; Values
    SOC: Community; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry; Values

Food for Thought: Hunger—Around the Block,
Around the World

Learners describe proper nutrition and compare their own eating habits with what is recommended by experts. They define hunger and malnutrition and identify local organizations from the four sectors of society (business, government, nonprofit, and family) that provide food for the hungry. 

  1. Food – What's in It for You?

    ART-VA: Audience; Creative Writing; Expository Text; Graphic Organizer; Journaling; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Creative Writing; Expository Text; Graphic Organizer; Journaling; Presentations; Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Activism; Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Service Project
    SCI: Food; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Health; Life Science; Nutrition
    SOC: 12 genOn
  2. Local Hunger and Malnutrition

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Non-Fiction Literature; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Community; Hunger
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Economics; Nonprofit
  3. Thoughts on Global Hunger

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Personal Response; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Economics; Trade
  4. Making a Difference in the World

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural; Distribution

For Goodness Sake, Why Don't We Give More Power to the People?

This unit will introduce the learners to the manner in which marginalized, disenfranchised, and disadvantaged individuals have used the nonprofit sector as an alternative power structure in American society. 

  1. Power, Power, Who Holds the Power?

    PHIL: Altruism; Business; Charity; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Hispanics; Native Americans; Nonprofit Sector; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Business; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Discrimination; Diversity; Good Character; Government; Historical Biographies; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Research; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Changing for the Common Good

    PHIL: Minorities; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Chronology; Discrimination; For-Profit; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Nonprofit; Timelines
  3. Power to the People

    PHIL: Minorities; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Core Democratic Values; Discrimination; Diversity; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Ideals/Reality; Research; Social Action
  4. Surveys and Nonprofits

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment
    SOC: 1 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry; Interview; Social Action; Survey

For the Well-Being of Our Citizens

Looking at historical situations of economic difficulty in the United States, the learners analyze presidential decisions and the role of philanthropy during such times. Students will define poverty, connect it to human rights issues, and analyze how nonprofit organizations have an important role to play in alleviating the effects of poverty. The learners will read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

  1. Social Programs and Government Responsibility

    PHIL: Community; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; 6 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Federalism; Great Depression; Limited Government; Local Government; National Government; Presidential Roles; Public Policy; State Government; Volunteerism
  2. Poverty and Human Rights

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Text; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Human Rights; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; 6 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Contemporary Issues; Human Rights; Universal Declaration of Human Rights
  3. To the Rescue

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Brainstorming; Informational Genre; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Community; Global Community; Homelessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; 6 genOn; Contemporary Issues; Economics; For-Profit; Goods and Services; Government; Nonprofit; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs

From Passion to Career: Leadership Paths

Students gain understanding of organizations, leadership, and collaboration by using resources from the Our State of Generosity website. Students research career pathways of nonprofit leaders that match their own passions, and develop service projects that allow them to build career readiness skills while serving others. 

  1. Leadership Lessons

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Presentations; Reflection
    PHIL: Character; Civil Society; Community; Ennobled Self; Leadership
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Delegated Power
  2. Competition vs Collaboration in Philanthropy

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Teamwork
    PHIL: Cooperate; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Cooperative Groups
  3. Career Pathways and How They Wind

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Electronic Text; Teamwork
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Volunteering
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Nonprofit

Games People Play (9-12)

Students learn to play Bridge with step by step instructions. They make an analogy between civil society and the "game of life" (includes rules, trust, and relationships). Through learning and playing the card game Bridge, students learn and practice life/social skills and skills of memory, concentration, and critical thinking. 

  1. Rules of the Game (9-12)

    ELA: Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Social Contract
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Rules; School Community; Social Action
  2. Bridging the Gap with "Bridge" (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Common Good; Family; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Service Project; Social Contract
    SOC: Consensus; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Rules; School Community; Social Action
  3. Let the Games Begin! (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Algebraic Expressions; Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Service Project
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  4. Opening and Responding (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  5. Competitive Bidding (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  6. Stayman Convention (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  7. Preemptive Bid (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Algebraic Expressions; Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules

Generosity of Spirit Folktales

Folktales from all over the world reveal much about giving to others. They reveal a "generosity of spirit" that speaks the common language of "giving." Learners identify what constitutes a folktale, define philanthropy, recognize cultural influences in folktales, and analyze motivations for giving through reading diverse folktales from around the world.

  1. Understanding Folktales and Their Philanthropic Connections

    ELA: Folktales; Myths; Parable
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Literature; Sacrifice; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Common Good
  2. Australian Folktales

    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: How the Kangaroo Got Her Pouch; How the Selfish Goannas Lost Their Wives; Secret of Dreaming (The); Folktales; Myths; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropic Literature; Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: Australia; Cultures; Environment; Human Characteristics of Place; Native Peoples; Natural Characteristics of Place
  3. Reluctant Givers

    ELA: Collared Crow (The); Couple of Misers (A); Story and a Song (A); Story-Bag (The); Fable; Folktales; Perception; Story Mapping
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Hunger; Motivation for Giving; Sharing
    SOC: Africa; Asia; Cultures; Geography; India; Korea; Scarcity
  4. Gifts of All Sizes

    ELA: Brave Little Parrot (The); Drum (The); Luck of a Child (The); Ma’Ruf the Shoemaker; Sedge Hats for Jizo; Silk Brocade (The); Tatema (The); Fable; Folktales; Perception; Retelling
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Buddhism; Giving; Judaism; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Asia; China; Cultural Regions; Good Character; India; Japan; Kuridstan; Mexico; Opportunity Costs; Palestine; South America
  5. Chinese Folktales

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Lord of the Cranes; Lo-Sun, the Blind Boy; Fable; Folktales; Plot Development
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Kindness
    SOC: Asia; China; Choices/Consequences; Human Characteristics of Place
  6. Inuit Folktales

    ELA: Old Woman Who Was Kind to Insects (The); Tiggak; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Native Americans
    SOC: Native Peoples; Natural Characteristics of Place
  7. Buddhist Folktales

    ELA: Banyan Deer (The); Blossom Tree (The); Great Joy the Ox; Padmasambhava and the Felicity Scarf; Steadfast Parrot (The); Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Folktales; Myths; Perception
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Character; Common Good; Friendship; Leadership; Religious Perspectives; Sacrifice
    SOC: Asia; Cultural Regions; India; Religion; Siddhartha Gautama; Tibet
  8. Reactions of the Masters

    ELA: Beth Gellert; Evil Allures, But Good Endures; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Perception; Tolstoy
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Philanthropic Act; Sacrifice
    SOC: Europe; Good Character; Human Characteristics of Place; Prince Llewelyn of Wales; Russia; Wales
  9. Gifts Disrespected

    ELA: Flowering Tree (A); Magic Bear (The); Fable; Folktales; Perception
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Native Americans; Respect
    SOC: Asia; Human Characteristics of Place; India
  10. Jewish Folktales

    ELA: Clotheslines (The); Defending His Property; Loosening the Stopper; Special Gift (A); Three Laughs (The); Author’s Style/Purpose; Folktales; Parable; Perception; Role-Play; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Judaism; Religious Perspectives; Tzedakah
    SOC: Asia; Cultures; Europe; Human Characteristics of Place; Israel; Poland; Rabbi Levi Yitzhak of Berdichev; Rabbi Schneur Zalman; Rabbi Yisrael Baal Shem Tov
  11. African Folktales

    ELA: Collared Crow (The); Cruel Creditor and the Judge’s Wise Daughter (The); Gratitude: The Hunter and the Antelope; Ostrich Egg Wife (The); Selekana and the River God; Africa; Constructing Meaning; Fable; Folktales; Morocco; Perception; Reflection; South Africa
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; African American; Character; Giving; Helping; Honesty; Justice; Kindness; Trust
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cultural Regions; Decision Making Model; Human Characteristics of Place; Justice
  12. Native American Folktales

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Bokewa or The Humpback; Circle of Life and the Clambake (The); Collared Crow (The); Cruel Creditor and the Judge’s Wise Daughter (The); Hopis and the Famine (The); Little Boy Who Talked With Birds (The); Magic Bear (The); Mon-Daw-Min or the Origin of Indian Corn: An Ojibwa Tale; Old Woman Who Was Kind to Insects (The); Ostrich Egg Wife (The); Selekana and the River God; Sheem: The Forsaken Boy; Thunder Deputizes the Eagle (The); Tiggak; Two Jeebi-Ug or A Trial of Feeling (The); Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Group Discussions; Myths; Perception; Research; Stereotyping/Bias; Story Mapping; Writing Process
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Caring/Sharing; Character; Family; Giving; Helping; Leadership; Native Americans
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cherokee; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Hopi; Human Characteristics of Place; Inuit; Maya; Menomini; Native Peoples; Ojibwa; South America; Wampanoag
  13. Hospitality

    ELA: Calabash of Poi (A); Even Her Taking Was Giving; Luck of a Child (The); Soup of the Soup; Compare/Contrast; Concept Mapping; Folktales; Hawaii; Israel; Kuridstan; Myths; Social/Cultural Issues; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Caring/Sharing; Islam; Judaism
    SOC: Cultures; Human Characteristics of Place
  14. Forgiveness

    ART-M: Music: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Both Friend and Foe the Saints Adore; Little Boy Who Talked With Birds (The); Young Man Who Refused to Kill (The); Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Perception; Social/Cultural Issues; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Family
    SOC: Cultures; Family; India; Maya; South America; Tibet
  15. Environmental Stewardship

    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brave Little Parrot (The); Kogi the Priest; Secret of Dreaming (The); Concept Mapping; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Folktales; Myths; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Civil Society; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: Australia; Civil Society; Cultures; Ecosystems; India; Japan; Natural Characteristics of Place
  16. Sufi Folktales

    ELA: Mullah in the Turkish Bath; Mullah’s Miracle; Three Fridays; Folktales; Perception; Social/Cultural Issues; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Character; Islam; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Cultural Regions; Human Characteristics of Place; Iran; Persia
  17. Folktales from the Americas

    ELA: Boy and His Donkey (A); Gratitude: The Hunter and the Antelope; Harvest Birds (The); Hog (The); Trouble With Helping Out (The); Anansi; Author’s Style/Purpose; Character Development; Constructing Meaning; Fable; Folktales; Perception
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; African American; Character; Hispanics; Reciprocity; Serial Reciprocity
    SCI: Garden; Symbiosis
    SOC: Africa; Cultural Regions; Human Characteristics of Place; Mexico; South America; Surinam
  18. Asian Folktales

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: History/Culture
    ELA: Aina-Kizz and the Black-Bearded Bai; Clever Wife (The); Earth Cakes, Sky Cakes; King Who Was Fried (The); Sayed’s Boots; Stubborn Husband, Stubborn Wife; Woodcutter (The); Author’s Style/Purpose; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Character; Judaism; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: China; Cultural Regions; Human Characteristics of Place; India; Iran; Palestine; Persia; Vietnam
  19. Tales of Wisdom and Discernment

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Magic Pomegranate (The); Old Alchemist (The); Story of the Two Old Women (The); Wise Quail (The); Author’s Style/Purpose; Compare/Contrast; Fable; Folktales; Parable; Personal Response
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Conflict Resolution; Egoism; Judaism
    SOC: Bangladesh; Burma; Cultural Regions; Decision Making Model; Human Characteristics of Place; India
  20. European Folktales

    ELA: Fairy Shilling (The); Lute Player (The); Three Fayes (The); Treasure (The); Where Love Is, God Is; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Fable; Folktales; Letter Writing; Parable; Perception; Tolstoy
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Character; Christianity; Foundations; Judaism; Pro-Social Behavior
    SOC: Cultural Regions; Cultures; Czechoslovakia; Good Character; Human Characteristics of Place; Ireland; Russia; Sweden

Gift of Art (The): Private Action for the Common Good (PAG)

The students review the concept of philanthropy through viewing a logo. They design original logos that represent philanthropy and related ideas. They explore philanthropic behavior as it relates to the arts.

  1. Gift of Art (The): Private Action for the Common Good (PAG)

    ELA: Universal Themes
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Serial Reciprocity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Visual Arts

Giving to Others (Tzedakah) (Private-Religious)

Students explore the idea of giving to others through Biblical laws, stories, modern biographies, and Rabbinical interpretations. They participate in group discussions and creative activities that foster an appreciation for giving charity and the rewards derived from it.  

  1. Maimonides' Eight Levels (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Influence; Letter Writing; Main Idea; Parable; Presentations; Reflection; Response to Text; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Career Opportunities; Charity; Contribute; Donate; Helping; Judaism; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Plan; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Ethics; Parochial
  2. Charity in the Bible (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Creative Writing; Group Discussions; Main Idea; Reading; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Charity; Civil Society; Giving; Judaism; Religious Perspectives; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Consumption; Environment; Ethics; Land Use; Parochial; Production/Producer; Resources
  3. 10% to the Needy (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Biography; Group Discussions; Point of View; Questioning; Social/Cultural Issues
    MAT: Money; Percent
    PHIL: Judaism
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Consumption; Environment; Ethics; Land Use; Parochial; Resources; Values

Global Education: Why Learn? (9-12)

Students analyze the effects of education on individuals, communities, and the world. They demonstrate that we are all connected and that others are affected by things that we believe only affect us. They learn about gender inequality in schools globally and explore policies for achieving universal primary education for kids all over the world. 

  1. School Is Out

    ELA: Role-Play
    PHIL: Community; Global Community
    SOC: Business; Common Good; Family; Global Issues; Government; Nonprofit
  2. Whose Responsibility Is It?

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Visual Media
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Empathy; Empower
    SOC: Civil Rights; Common Good; Geography; Interdependence
  3. UN's Millenium Goals

    ELA: Communicate; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Donate; Philanthropic Act; Service
    SOC: Common Good; Interdependence; Maps/Globes

Global Health: Hunger and Food Around the Globe (9-12)

Students view pictures of families from around the world with the food that they eat in a week. They discuss how cultural and regional differences affect food. They analyze a healthy diet and reflect on whether the nutritional needs of families are an issue of the common good. They assess their own food choices and address a food/health related issue or need, locally or globally.

  1. What Do People Around the World Eat?

    ELA: Personal Response; Viewing; Viewpoint; Visual Media
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger; Reflection
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Diverse Communities; Diversity; Economics; Global Issues; Health and Disease; Major World Regions
  2. Where Does Our Food Travel?

    ELA: Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Reflection; Technology; Visual Media
    MAT: Comparing Numbers
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger; Reflection
    SOC: Cultures; Distribution; Economics; Environment; Global Issues; Health and Disease; Location
  3. Local Food and Global Health

    ELA: Group Discussions; Information Gathering; Social/Cultural Issues; Synthesizing; Teamwork
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Advocacy; Giving; Global Community; Hunger; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service; Volunteer
    SOC: Cultures; Diverse Communities; Global Issues; Health and Disease

Global Hunger and Malnutrition (11th Grade)

Learners recognize hunger as a global community issue and the role of the four sectors of society in solving problems of hunger in the community. They will be challenged to apply their own time, talent and treasure to address the issue of local hunger.

  1. Global Hunger and Malnutrition (11th Grade)

    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; 5 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Health and Disease; Scarcity

Great Debate (The)--Do Americans Today Have
Civic Virtue? (10th Grade)

Students read two articles that answer the question: Do Americans today exhibit civic virtue?. They will make a personal plan to exhibit civic virtue through civic engagement in an environmental act.

  1. Great Debate (The)--Do Americans Today Have
    Civic Virtue? (10th Grade)

    ELA: Debate; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Questioning; Research; Speaking; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Service Plan; Social Action; Values; Volunteer
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Environment; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities

Grow Involved 9-12

Students respond to literature about Martin Luther King, Jr. and compare his views on service to the philosophies of characters in books and a movie (some fiction, some nonfiction). Students learn that service and social action by one person can change the world. They learn about serial reciprocity and explore the issues of violence, prejudice, and racism.
  1. Advocacy and Activism (Introduction Grade 9-12)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: African American; Justice; Philanthropist; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Common Good; Desegregation; Human Rights
  2. Pay It Forward (Grade 9)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Viewing
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Community; Donate; Needs Assessment; Serial Reciprocity; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Consensus
  3. Promote Nonviolence (Grade 10)

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Character Development; Inferences/Generalizations; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Civil Society; Community; Conflict Resolution; Empathy; Reflection
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Justice
  4. Do the Write Thing (Grade 11)

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Autobiography; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Letter Writing; Reflection
    PHIL: Advocacy; Conflict Resolution; Problem Solving; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Government; Justice
  5. A Forum on Racism (Grade 12)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Autobiography; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Advocacy; African American; Justice; Problem Solving; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Common Good; Consensus; Racism

Growing a Citizen

This unit teaches the skills young people need to participate in the democratic process as responsible citizens. Young people can do the work of citizens, where they feel positive that they can make a difference, Learners analyze how the work of a citizen is described in the literature of different faith traditions. They develop a personal mission statement of responsible citizenship.

  1. What Would Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha and Krishna Say?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Letter Writing; Literary Forms/Genre; Parable; Personal Response; Point of View; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Analyze/Interpret; Charity; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Human Rights; Justice; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Religion; Tolerance; Traditions; Values
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Human Rights; Justice; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Religion; Tolerance; Traditions; Values
  2. Participatory Citizen or Slacker—Which One Will You Be?

    ELA: Audience; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Language/Style; Personal Response; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Synthesizing; Understanding/Interpretation; Voice
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Civil Society; Social Action; Values
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Democratic Values; Social Action; Values
  3. Personal Giving Mission Statement (A)

    ELA: Writing Process
    PHIL: Civil Society; Helping; Mission Statement; Personal Giving Plan
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Core Democratic Values; Nonprofit Organizations
  4. Putting Citizenship into Practice

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Journaling; Point of View; Reflection; Self Assessment
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Mission Statement; Reflection; Service Learning
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Economics

Growing an Environmental Steward

The purpose of this unit is to assist the learner in developing a deeper understanding of what it means to be a steward of the environment and to apply this knowledge to identified environmental problems as they relate to landscaping and gardening. 

  1. Envi and Ron Steward

    PHIL: Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment
    SOC: Communities
  2. In My Own Backyard

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Survey; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment
    SOC: Communities
  3. Landscape Garden Makeover

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Writing Mechanics
    MAT: Picture Models
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Environment; Stewardship

Healthy Youth, Healthy Community (9-12)

Students explore healthy living habits for themselves and for their community. They practice making healthy food choices, exercising and helping people of the community do the same. Learners develop a service-learning project based on a community needs assessment.

  1. Classroom Community and Good Health

    ELA: Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  2. Your Body and Health Issues

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Community; Empower; Needs Assessment; Neighborhood
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  3. Introduction to Service

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Helping; Leadership; Motivation for Giving; Problem Solving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  4. Prepare to Take Action!

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Helping; Leadership; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  5. Take Action!

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Leadership; Motivation for Giving; Problem Solving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service; Volunteer
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community

Helping Refugees

Students gain insight into what it means to be a refugee and the difficulties refugees face to survive. Students explore the role of the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and produce a symposium on the work of UNHCR in a virtual online presentation or as a traditional presentation.

  1. How Does it Feel to be a Refugee?

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Advocacy; Empathy; Refugees; UNHCR
    SOC: 6 genOn; Civil Society; Developing Countries; Global Issues
  2. Working with Refugees

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Debate; Group Discussions; Media Genre; Personal Response; Viewing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Commons; Contribute; Empathy; Global Community; Helping; Justice
    SOC: 6 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Developing Countries; Diversity; Geography; Global Issues; Nonprofit; Refugees
  3. Symposium on Refugees

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Contribute; Empower; Fundraising; Global Community; Leadership; Reflection; Service
    SOC: 6 genOn; Common Good; Current Events; Developing Countries; Diverse Communities; Global Issues; Human Rights; Refugees; Wants/Needs

Heroism In Literature

Learners will explore their personal definitions of heroism, compare their concepts to those found in classical literature, and consider ways they can personally practice simple acts of heroism through philanthropy in their own lives.

  1. What Is a Hero? Heroism in Greek Mythology

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Myths; Nonverbal Communication; Visual Media
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 9/11genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Cause/Effect; Inquiry; Point of View
  2. Heroism in English Myth

    ART: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Cause/Effect; Cultural/Historical Contexts; King Arthur; Legend
    PHIL: Advocacy; Altruism; Common Good; Enlightened Self-Interest; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Chronology; Good Character; Personal Virtue
  3. Questioning Our Definition—Acts of Courage

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Research; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Courage; Sacrifice
    SOC: 10 genOn; Cause/Effect; Core Democratic Values; Peer Review; Research
  4. Heroism—Opportunities for Action

    ART: Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary; Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Group Discussions; Research; Response to Text/Others; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Foundations; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 2 genOn; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Primary/Secondary Sources

How Prophet-able Are You?

Learners explore issues of social justice and analyze the qualities and roles of a prophet/advocate, such as the classical prophets Amos and Hosea, as well as contemporary prophets. The learners advocate to address social injustices

  1. What Is Your Gripe?

    PHIL: Values
    SOC: 1 genOn; Justice; Values
  2. Being a Prophet—Traits of the Trade

    PHIL: Advocacy; Pro-Social Behavior; Social Action; Social Justice
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Justice; Values
  3. Ancient Advocates for Change

    ELA: Old Testament; Reflection; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Courage; Religious Perspectives
  4. Modern Advocates for Change

    ELA: Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Point of View
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Social Action
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Justice; Social Action; Values

Hurricane Katrina / Great Hanshin-Awaji Disaster Collaboration

This unit introduces learners to different types of natural disasters, exploring how their potential devastation could be reduced, and how during and in their aftermath, individuals, civil society organizations and government can provide assistance to help those impacted by the devastation. This unit was created as part of a collaborative initiative on promoting youth philanthropy education through a global network between the United States and Japan.

  1. Natural Disasters

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Contribute; Emergency Response; Helping; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Relief
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Disaster: Natural; Environment
  2. Preparedness for Natural Disasters

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Emergency Response; Social Capital
    SOC: Disaster: Natural; Environment
  3. Who Can Help? Sharing Makes Caring

    ELA: Journaling; Presentations; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Contribute; Emergency Response; Helping; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Relief; Service Plan; Service Project; Social Capital; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Disaster: Natural; Environment

Investing In Others (9-12)

Students explore the benefits and costs of credit and using a credit card. They role-play a shopping trip and come up with arguments for and against buying something they want but do not need. They examine how their personal choices affect other people. The students plan and carry out a service project that advocates for financial responsibility.

  1. I Can Buy Anything I Want

    ELA: Reflection; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Global Community; Responsibility
    SOC: Common Good; Economics; Global Issues
  2. Five Thousand Dollars!

    ELA: Group Discussions; Role-Play; Viewpoint
    SOC: Costs; Decision Making Model; Economics; Financial Resources
  3. Debt: Who Does It Affect?

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Audience; Communicate; Group Discussions; Presentation
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Service
    SOC: Common Good; Economics

It's Up to Whom? You! (12th Grade)

Students define philanthropy and identify past and present volunteers in their communities and/or world. They explore the risks (opportunity costs) as well as the merits of volunteering for the common good and a more civil society.

  1. It's Up to Whom? You!

    ELA: Listening
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Giving; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Responsibility

Job Shadowing in the Nonprofit Sector

Students will select a specific nonprofit organization within their community. They will learn more about the operation of the organization through a series of structured interviews and through volunteer work for the organization for a minimum of five hours.

  1. Identifying the Nonprofit Sector

    SOC: Economics; Free Market; Goods and Services; Government; Nonprofit
  2. Investigating Voluntarism in the Nonprofit Sector

    PHIL: Board of Directors; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Inquiry; Interview; Journaling; Presentations; Reflection; Research

Jobs on the Move

Students investigate economic and environmental conditions that influence employment in their community. Students compare recent times to the Great Depression, analyze the availability of natural resources, explore current job statistics, and hold a job fair simulation. 

  1. Past and Present Parallels

    ELA: Of Mice and Men; Analyze/Interpret; Author's Style/Purpose; Character Development; Historical Fiction; Questioning; Visual Media; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Advocacy; Need; Reflection; Service; Volunteer
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Economics; Great Depression; Nonprofit; Recession
  2. Working with What You've Got

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Presentations; Reflection; Teamwork; Understanding/Interpretation
    MAT: Analyze Change; Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Common Good; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Service
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Environment; Land Management; Natural Resources; Technology
    SOC: Business; Career Opportunities; Choices/Consequences; Consumption; Current Events; Economics; Ecosystems; Environment; Financial Resources; Goods and Services; Human Capital; Industry; Labor; Land Use; Natural Resources; Resources
  3. Investigating Statistics

    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Electronic Text; Journaling; Presentations; Research; Technology
    MAT: Analyze Change; Comparing Numbers; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Interpret
    PHIL: Advocacy; Benefits; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Contemporary Issues; Economics; Government; Labor; Research; Salary; Unemployment
  4. Job Fair Simulation

    ELA: Audience; Brainstorming; Character Development; Group Discussions; Language/Style; Listening; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Presentations; Research; Role-Play; Teamwork; Writing Process
    PHIL: Perseverance
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Choices/Consequences

Landscape Legacies

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to The Group of Seven, a group of artists whose intent was to establish a national identity, a sense of pride and original style for Canada, inspired by the environment. This was a philanthropic endeavor for the common good of all. Students will create similar landscapes of their local community to inspire environmental stewardship.

  1. Landscape Legacies

    ELA: Universal Themes
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Legacy; Stewardship; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Environment; Good Character

Launching Your Ship with Citizenship

Students describe the characteristics of a good citizen relative to democracy and become familiar with the fundamental principles of American society, including rights and responsibilities. They recognize that even high school students can make a difference through the electoral process. They look at current issues and make personal statements about the current candidates.

 

  1. Charting the Course

    ELA: Character Development; Group Discussions; Presentations; Role-Play; Teamwork; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 5 genOn; 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character; Community; Courtesy; Friendship; Giving; Helping; Honesty; Respect; Tolerance; Values
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Bill of Rights; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Cultures; Democratic Values; Diversity; Equality; Freedom; Good Character; Individual Rights; Justice; Liberty; Patriotism; Religion; Rights/Responsibilities; Tolerance
  2. Knowing the Ropes

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Listening; Reflection; Speaking; Writing Process
    PHIL: Contribute; Cooperate; Reflection; Tolerance
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Civil Rights; Constitution of the United States; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Individual Rights; National Government; Patriotism
  3. Not the Only Fish in the Sea

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reading; Speaking
    PHIL: Activism; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Family; Mission Statement; Neighborhood; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Democracy; Democratic Values; Economics; Elections; For-Profit; Government; Nonprofit; School Community; Social/Cultural Issues; Voting
  4. Hoisting the Flag

    ELA: Brainstorming; Character Perception; Expository Writing; Personal Response; Point of View; Presentations; Reflection
    PHIL: Activism; Community; In-Kind Contribution; Opportunity Costs; Time/Talent/Treasure; Values
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Contemporary Issues; Elections; Good Character; Government; Political Process; Rule of Law; Values; Volunteerism; Voting

Launching Your Ship with Citizenship: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (12th)

The learners review the Fundamental Democratic Principles that unite Americans and lead them to act for the common good. The learners understand that they have roles to play as civic participants and that by doing so, they can make a difference.

  1. Charting the Course: Philanthropy Lesson (12th)

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Group Discussions; Presentations; Reflection; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character; Giving; Helping; Honesty; Respect; Tolerance; Values
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character
  2. Knowing the Ropes: Philanthropy Lesson (12th)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Listening; Reflection
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Character
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Good Character; U.S. Constitution
  3. Not the Only Fish in the Sea: Philanthropy Lesson (12th)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character; Contribute; Giving; Values
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Good Character

Lesson from Jane (A) (10th Grade)

Students read about Jane Addams whose philanthropy took the form of advocacy and influenced the other economic sectors (government, for-profit or business sector, and households sector) of the American economy/society.
  1. Lesson from Jane (A) (10th Grade)

    PHIL: 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Government; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer; Volunteerism
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; For-Profit; Giving; Good Character; Nonprofit; Personal Virtue; Responsibility

Lights! Camera! Take Action!

Students explore the stories, events, personalities, and motivations that create a culture of philanthropy. Using a video as a model, students learn about the philanthropists, unique features, and needs of their own community and create documentaries. Although it was written about West Michigan, this unit is easily adapted to any community, urban or rural.

  1. A Good Story

    ELA: Brainstorming; Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Journaling; Metaphor; Personal Response; Reflection; Visual Media; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Common Good; Community; Giving; Helping; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Gift of All (The); Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Good Character; Great Depression; Social Action; Values
  2. A Motivated Cast

    ELA: Group Discussions; Personal Response; Reflection; Visual Media; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Community; Contribute; Egoism; Giving; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Reflection; Religious Perspectives
    SOC: Gift of All (The); Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; Religion; Scarcity; Social Action; Values
  3. Life Inspires Art Inspires Life

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Biography; Communicate; Influence; Informational Media; Interview; Language/Style; Reflection; Visual Media; Writing Process
    PHIL: Character; Community; Family; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Values
    SOC: Gift of All (The); Business; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Environment; Family; Good Character; Natural Characteristics of Place; Personal Virtue; Point of View
  4. A Grand Showing

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Biography; Cause/Effect; Communicate; Group Discussions; Informational Media; Listening; Reflection; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Benefits; Caring/Sharing; Community; Donate; Giving; Reflection
    SOC: Gift of All (The); Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Cooperative Groups

Literacy for You and Me

Students learn about literacy in our world, nation, state and their local community. Students reflect on statistics about literacy rates and access to books, then they create a plan of action to increase access to reading materials.This unit contains a specific plan for a service project that can be adapted to fit local needs and interests of the students.

  1. Literacy for All

    ELA: Brainstorming; Informational Genre; Listening; Predicting
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Book Drive; Community; Enlightened Self-Interest; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Responsibility
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
  2. Read 'n' Give--Planning our Drive HS

    ELA: Read n' Give; Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Book Drive; Caring/Sharing; Community; Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Problem Solving
    SOC: Civil Society; Common Good; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  3. Blogging about Books

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Read n' Give; Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Communicate; Electronic Text; Journaling; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Technology
    PHIL: Book Drive; Community; Serial Reciprocity
    SOC: Diverse Communities
  4. Sharing the Book Drive

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Read n' Give; Audience; Group Discussions; Reading; Reflection; Speaking; Visual Media
    PHIL: Book Drive; Caring/Sharing; Community; Donate; Giving; Serial Reciprocity

Living Your Passion: Penny Drive

The learners will explore their strong interests/passions and determine the role that these play in helping motivate their participation in philanthropic activities to promote the common good.

  1. Living Your Passion: Penny Drive

    PHIL: Altruism; Common Good; Community Foundation; Contribute; Donate; Foundations; Fundraising; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Sharing; Volunteer
    SOC: Advocacy; Choices/Consequences; Economics; Financial Resources; Foundations; Ideals/Reality; Incentives; Nonprofit; Resource Allocation; Volunteerism

Looking at Our Community (11th Grade)

The students analyze the community through their own eyes and the “eyes” of the media, and describe their community using the five themes of geography. They list environmental assets and those conditions in need of improvement. 

  1. Looking at Our Community (11th Grade)

    ELA: Questioning; Research
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Environmental Stewardship; Needs Assessment; Survey
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Conservation; Ecology
    SOC: Communities; Economics; Environment; Human Characteristics of Place; Location; Movement; Point of View

Majority Rule—Minority Rights

In a civil society, it is everyone's responsibility to protect the rights of the minority, and this protection is often championed through political action by the nonprofit sector. It is in the enlightened self-interest of the majority to protect the rights of the minority because one day the majority will find itself in the minority. 

  1. Is Anyone Listening?

    ELA: Journaling
    PHIL: Global Community
    SOC: 1 genOn; Democratic Values; Economics
  2. Majority Rules, But (The)

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Journaling
    PHIL: Minorities; Social Action; Social Justice
    SOC: 1 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Declaration of Independence; Democratic Values; Equality; Government; Justice; Majority Rule; Minorities
  3. Ordering a Pizza

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Journaling
    PHIL: Minorities; Social Action; Social Justice
    SOC: 1 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Declaration of Independence; Democratic Values; Equality; Government; Justice; Majority Rule; Minorities

Making Choices with Scarce Resources: Penny Drive

Learners will use economic thinking to determine how to allocate their scarce resources for community service.

  1. Making Choices with Scarce Resources: Penny Drive

    ELA: Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Common Good; Fundraising; Opportunity Costs; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Advocacy; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Consensus; Costs; Economics; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity

Making our Voices Heard for the Community (9th Grade)

Raise students' awareness of the importance of freedom of speech and the opportunity to voice one's opinion without fear of reprisal, as principles basic to a democracy. The learners investigate ways to have a positive influence in encouraging eligible voters to make their voices heard at the polls during elections and/or referendums.  
  1. Making our Voices Heard for the Community (9th Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Community
    SOC: Advocacy; Communities

Mighty Pens: Writers for Positive Change

Develop students' skills of writing in several genres: persuasive essay, news story, reflective journaling, and personal narrative. They recognize that reflecting and writing about civic engagement, service, and volunteerism enables them to clarify their own commitment and participation in contributing to the common good, and also gives them the power to inspire and persuade others to serve. Students are encouraged to publish their stories in writing, podcasts, weblogs, or other forms of media.

  1. Persuasive Writers

    ELA: Author’s Style/Purpose; Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Peer Review; Personal Response; Persuasive Techniques; Prior Knowledge; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Common Good; Community
    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Volunteerism
  2. Writing Newspaper Articles

    ELA: Audience; Author’s Style/Purpose; Communicate; Expository Writing; Peer Review; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Common Good; Service Project
    SOC: Advocacy; Bill of Rights; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Freedom; Volunteerism
  3. Reflective Journaling

    ELA: Language/Style; Peer Review; Personal Response; Reflection; Self-Assessment; Social/Cultural Issues; Voice; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Activism; Common Good; Community
    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Volunteerism
  4. Personal Narrative

    ELA: Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Metaphor; Narrative Writing; Peer Review; Personal Response; Reflection; Self-Assessment; Voice; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Reflection; Volunteer
    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Volunteerism

Money and Credit: Making Good Decisions (9-12)

Students crate a personal spending plan and learn the concepts of spend, save, invest, and donate. They investigate the uses and misuses of credit, including understanding of scarcity and opportunity cost in decision making.  Students choose a service learning project to promote financial literacy and responsible use of credit amongst peers.

  1. Money Smart Choices (9-12)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Decimals; Percent; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Giving Plan; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Benefits; Common Good; Consumers; Costs; Economics; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Scarcity; Wants/Needs
  2. Thinking about Credit (9-12)

    MAT: Algebraic Expressions; Calculators; Decimals; Division; Formula; Mathematical Vocabulary; Multiplication; Percent
    PHIL: Donate; Opportunity Costs
    SOC: Budget; Choices/Consequences; Costs; Economics; Financial Resources; Scarcity; Spending; Wants/Needs
  3. Deciding to Serve (9-12)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Need; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Wants/Needs
  4. Telling Our Story (9-12)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Communicate; Presentations; Visual Media
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Reflection; Service Project

Money Smart Teens (9-12)

Introduce the basic concepts of spending, saving, donating, and investing, with emphasis on the concept of philanthropy. Students use an economic decision-making model and create personal budgets. They also investigate budgets of nonprofit/civil society organizations and participate in an act of philanthropy as a class by presenting funds they have raised to a nonprofit. Students learn about scarcity, the role of opportunity cost in decision-making, and the power of incentives in behavior. 

  1. Spend, Save, Invest or Donate (9-12)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Decimals; Percent; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Giving Plan; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Benefits; Common Good; Consumers; Costs; Economics; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Scarcity; Wants/Needs
  2. Thinking About Money and Goals (9-12)

    ELA: Personal Response
    PHIL: Charity; Common Good; Donate; Fundraising
    SOC: Budget; Consumers; Economics; Family; Goods and Services; Incentives; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity; Spending; Taxation; Wants/Needs
  3. Making Good Money Choices (9-12)

    ELA: Questioning; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Donate; Fundraising; Need; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Budget; Common Good; Communities; Decision Making Model; Income; Opportunity Costs; Resources
  4. Learning to Spend, Learning to Give (9-12)

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Personal Giving Plan; Personal Wealth; Service Project
    SOC: Budget; Economics; Income; Investment; Resources; Spending

Motivated to Give (12th Grade)

The learners identify their own and others' motivations for giving and social action in the community. They promote giving and social action through persuasive writing.

  1. Motivated to Give (12th Grade)

    ELA: Expository Writing; Group Discussions; Listening; Personal Response; Point of View; Reflection; Self Assessment
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Altruism; Community; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Point of View; Social Action

Motivations for Giving: Penny Drive

Explore the local community to identify nonprofit services available. They compare these to the services of business and government to understand the different sectors. They investigate motivations for nonprofits and individual giving.

  1. Motivations for Giving: Penny Drive

    PHIL: Collections; Common Good; Fundraising; Motivation for Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteerism
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Communities; Government; Human Characteristics of Place

My Country, My Community

Learners explore the rights and responsibilities of American citizenship. They review knowledge of United States history and government necessary to become a naturalized citizen. They will study various symbolic elements which represent freedom, such as the American flag and the National Anthem. They will write a persuasive essay in which they determine the cost of freedom.

  1. It's a Free Country, Isn't It?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Creative Writing; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Civil Society; Values
    SOC: 2 genOn; Bill of Rights; Branches of Government; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Core Democratic Values; Democratic Values; Freedom; Government; Immigration; Laws
  2. “An American Story” -- The Responsibility of Citizenship

    ELA: American Story (An); Character Development; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Ethics; Journaling; Questioning
    PHIL: Activism; Common Good; Community; Heroes; Hispanics; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Core Democratic Values
  3. Freedom Isn't Free

    ELA: Expository Writing; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Process
    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Amendments to Constitution; Bill of Rights; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Core Democratic Values; Democratic Values; Individual Rights; Point of View; Values

New Philanthropy--A Hands-On Way of Giving (The)

Students learn about philanthropy, philanthropic individuals, and nonprofit organizations from 1815 until the present. A writing project involves exploring a major social issue as a "commons problem." 

  1. Philanthropy and Philanthropists' Qualities

    PHIL: Empathy; Humanitarian; Pro-Social Behavior; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue; Research
  2. For the Common Good—A Time Capsule

    ELA: Media Genres; Presentations; Technology; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Altruism; Empathy; Humanitarian; Pro-Social Behavior; Selflessness; Tolerance
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research
  3. New Philanthropists (The)

    PHIL: Donate; Foundations; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropist
    SOC: Good Character; Personal Virtue; Simulation
  4. Foundations—Who Gives What?

    PHIL: Foundations; Perpetuity
    SOC: Common Good; Inquiry; Research
  5. Biggest Commons Problem of All—What Is It (The)

    ELA: Reflection; Technology
    PHIL: Foundations; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Community; Inquiry; Social Action

New Philanthropy—A Hands-On Way of Giving (The): Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (10th)

This lesson develops a common vocabulary and understanding of philanthropy, identifying philanthropists as people who give time, talent, and treasure and take action for the common good. They hold organizations and people accountable for their actions with the common good as their motivation. 

  1. Philanthropy and Philanthropists: Philanthropy Unit (10th)

    PHIL: Advocacy; Altruism; Community; Empathy; Giving; Humanitarian; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropist; Pro-Social Behavior; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Research
  2. New Philanthropists (The): Philanthropy Unit (10th)

    ELA: Universal Themes
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Advocacy; Altruism; Common Good; Community; Contribute; Donate; Foundations; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropist
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Social Action

Opportunities in Philanthropy

These five lessons are part of a unit on career opportunities in philanthropy. The unit enables students to examine public policy issues linked to core democratic values. It begins by researching the United Way and some of its member agencies.

  1. Investigating How Our Community Needs Are Served

    ELA: Media Genres; Narrative Writing; Reflection; Research; Technology; Writing Process
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; United Way
    SOC: 10 genOn; Inquiry; Research
  2. Linking Community, Core Democratic Values and Public Policy Issues

    ELA: Expository Text; Expository Writing; Media Genres; Synthesizing; Technology; Thesis; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; United Way
    SOC: 10 genOn; Chronology; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Equality; Inquiry; Justice; Public Policy; Timelines
  3. Becoming a United Way or Member Agency Director

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: United Way
    SOC: 10 genOn; Career Opportunities; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Inquiry; Public Policy; Research
  4. Who Cares About Needs in the Community?

    ELA: Interview; Narrative Writing; Report; Role-Play
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; United Way
    SOC: 10 genOn; Career Opportunities; Inquiry
  5. Answering the Question of Serving Community Needs

    ELA: Letter Writing; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; United Way
    SOC: 10 genOn; Career Opportunities; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue

Out of the Ashes of WWII

The time immediately after World War II was a time when acts of philanthropy were desperately needed in countries devastated by the war. Urban renewal depended on small and large philanthropic acts, performed by government, for-profit organizations, nonprofit organizations as well as individuals, "Rubble Women" helped in the rebuilding of the city of Berlin. Students explore the Marshall Plan for mathematical data analysis.

  1. Consequences of WWII

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Research; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Common Good; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Relief
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Disaster: Human-Made; Environment; Research
  2. On the Road to Recovery: Rubble Women in Post WWII Germany

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Global Community; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Relief; Volunteer
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Disaster: Human-Made; Environment
  3. The Marshall Plan: Data Analysis

    ELA: Group Discussions; Personal Response
    MAT: Calculators; Conjectures; Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Estimation; Generalize; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Interpret; Linear/Nonlinear Functions; Mean/Median/Mode/Range; Models; Predict; Problem Solving; Range/Outlier; Scatterplots; Spreadsheet/Data Base; Tables
    PHIL: Donate; Giving; Global Community; Helping; Humanitarian; Philanthropic Act; Relief
    SOC: Budget; Cultures; Economics; Foreign Policy; Global Issues; Government; Gross Domestic Product; Investment; Marshall Plan (The); Population; War; World Trade
  4. A Local Marshall Plan: Bringing 'Renewal' to Our Community

    ELA: Personal Response; Presentations
    PHIL: Activism; Altruism; Caring/Sharing; Community; Cooperate; Giving; Needs Assessment; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Selflessness; Service; Social Action; Social Capital; Volunteer
    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Resource Allocation; Social Action; Volunteerism

Personal Giving Mission Statement (A): Penny Drive

Learners write a personal mission statement of responsible, engaged citizenship applicable to community service and philanthropy.

  1. Personal Giving Mission Statement (A): Penny Drive

    ELA: Peer Review; Reflection; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 12 genOn; Civil Society; Collections; Common Good; Contribute; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Mission Statement; Penny Drive; Personal Giving Plan; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Nonprofit Organizations

Philanthropic Research

This unit assists students in conducting philanthropic research using GuideStar and other online sources. Students can select areas of interest for possible philanthropy, read actual mission statements of philanthropic organizations, review their accomplishments and acquire information about their financial status. They will also compare the work of government departments with similar work done by nonprofit organizations and determine the necessity for the third sector.  

  1. How Should I Begin?

    PHIL: Mission Statement; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Media Genres; Research; Technology
  2. Government Agencies and Philanthropic Organizations

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Branches of Government; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Constitution of the United States; Declaration of Independence; Delegated Power; Diversity; Government; Guidestar.org; Inquiry; Presidential Roles; Presidential System; Reserved Powers; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. Nonprofit Organizations in the Local Economy

    PHIL: Community
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Economics; Guidestar.org; Income; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Research

Philanthropists in Our Midst

Learners highlight philanthropists in their community by writing a newspaper article. They may interview a senior citizen about their life of philanthropy. 

  1. What Is a Philanthropist and Why Do We Care?

    PHIL: Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: Core Democratic Values; Historical Biographies
  2. Philanthropists: Past, Present, Future

    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Donate; Foundations
    SOC: Foundations; Historical Biographies; Slavery
  3. I Decide

    ELA: Brainstorming; Interview; Peer Review; Presentations; Reflection; Writing Process
    PHIL: Character; Common Good; Community; Philanthropist; Reflection

Philanthropists in Our Midst: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (9th)

Learners define philanthropy and describe the significant impact that philanthropists have made in American civil and political life. Learners recognize qualities in a local philanthropist.

  1. What Is a Philanthropist and Why Do We Care?: Philanthropy Lesson (9th)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Reading; Research
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Heroes; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue; Social Action; Values
  2. Philanthropist Wall of Fame: Philanthropy Lesson (9th)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Character; Common Good; Philanthropist; Reflection
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue; Research; Values

Philanthropy at Home and Abroad

Students examine philanthropy, both globally and locally, comparing the work of foundations that provide international help to the work of their local community foundation. They identify reasons for giving and analyze their own motivations for philanthropy. Students participate in a fundraiser and choose which community organizations to fund.

  1. Global Issues

    ELA: Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Technology; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Common Good; Foundations; Fundraising; Nonprofit Organizations; Wants/Needs
    SCI: Disaster: Human-Made; Ecosystems; Health and Disease; Land Management; Pollution
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Adaptation; Cause/Effect; Cultures; Developing Countries; Economics; Environment; Financial Resources; Global Issues; Human Characteristics of Place; Interdependence; Maps; Populations; Resources; Volunteerism
  2. Looking at Our Community

    ELA: Media Characteristics; Questioning; Research
    PHIL: Fundraising; Needs Assessment; Survey
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Communities; Economics; Environment; Human Characteristics of Place; Location; Movement; Point of View; Populations
  3. Community Foundation at Work (The )

    ART: Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Research; Technology
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Community Foundation; Corporate Philanthropy; Foundations; Fundraising; Independent Foundation; Motivation for Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Communities; Government; Human Characteristics of Place
  4. We Do Our Share

    ELA: Brainstorming; Persuasive Techniques; Robert’s Rules of Order; Self Assessment
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Collections; Foundations; Fundraising; Motivation for Giving; Service Plan; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Human Characteristics of Place

Philanthropy, Volunteering and Service: The Historical Connections

Students develop understanding of philanthropy through definition and actions. Learners develop an awareness of and sensitivity to hunger issues in their community and world, and demonstrate understanding and sensitivity through completion of a service-learning project.

  1. Hmmm—What is Philanthropy?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Media Genres; Narrative Writing; Presentations; Research; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Altruism; Charity; Community Foundation; Endowment; Ennobled Self; Family Foundation; Foundations; Independent Foundation; Nonprofit Sector; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Common Good; September 11, 2001; Technology
  2. Hunger Hurts

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Journaling; Technology; Writing Process
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Homelessness; Hunger; Social Action
    SCI: Health
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural; Economics; Emergency Response; Global Issues; Goods and Services; Inquiry; Maps; Resources; Supply/Demand; Trade; Wants/Needs
  3. Philanthropy and the Great Society What Can We Do Today?

    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Reflection; Service Plan; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Government; Great Society (The); Inquiry; Johnson, Lyndon; Nonprofit; Recession; September 11, 2001; Unemployment

Philanthropy—Essential to a Democratic Society

Students define philanthropy and discuss the difference between duties and responsibilities of civic participation. Students become aware of the role of nonprofits in promoting social justice and fairness for minorities when the government can't do everything. Students look for support for philanthropy in national and state documents. They use parliamentary procedures and the town meeting format to develop their own philanthropic project.

  1. Philanthropy and Citizenship—Hand in Hand

    PHIL: Family; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Democratic Values; Economics; Good Character; Government
  2. What Is Government?

    PHIL: 9/11 genOn; Need
    SOC: Constitution of the United States; Democracy; Dictatorship; Government
  3. Void Filled by Nonprofits (The)

    PHIL: Endowment; Foundations; Minorities; Need; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; 9/11 genOn; Career Opportunities; Government; Inquiry; Minorities; Nonprofit; Research; Technology
  4. Support Within the National Documents

    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 9/11 genOn; Amendments to Constitution; Bill of Rights; Common Good; Constitution of the United States; Democracy; Government
  5. Creating a Government

    PHIL: School Rules; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; 9/11 genOn; Parliamentary Procedure; Rule of Law

Philanthropy's Role in a Democratic Society

Students respond critically to readings about philanthropists in history and use a variety of research methods to create both oral and visual presentations outlining the life and work of a chosen philanthropist from history. Students write a letter to youth today as if they were the philanthropist they have researched.

  1. Key Concepts in a Democratic Society

    ELA: Presentations; Technology; Writing Process
    PHIL: Philanthropist; Social Capital
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research
  2. Research & Development

    ELA: Presentations; Technology; Writing Process
    PHIL: Philanthropist
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research
  3. Dear Young Philanthropist

    ELA: Letter Writing; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Philanthropist
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue
  4. The Building of Philanthropic Tradition in America

    ELA: Brainstorming; Expository Text; Inferences/Generalizations; Non-Fiction Literature; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Civil Society; Philanthropist; Reflection; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Democratic Values

Pondering the Impermeable

Raise awareness about the impact of growth (commercial and residential) on the environment, specifically, how impervious surfaces impact the environment. As towns and suburbs grow, the commercial and residential building “landscape footprint” can be harmful to the environment unless carefully planned. Learners become aware of the environmental impact of impervious surfaces and take action as environmental stewards. The unit also illustrates how knowledge of science can inform our decisions and awareness as citizens.

  1. Impervious Surfaces

    ELA: Star-Ledger; Constructing Meaning; Debate; Listening; Point of View; Questioning; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Mission Statement; Reflection; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Critical Thinking; Earth Changes; Ecology; Natural Resources
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Environment; Natural Characteristics of Place; Population; Resources; Stewardship
  2. Land Development and the Environment

    ELA: Star-Ledger; Creative Writing; Poetry; Point of View; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Land Management; Observation; Population Growth; Scientific Investigation; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Economics; Individual Rights; Natural Characteristics of Place; Population; Transportation; Urbanization
  3. Be the Change You Want for Your Community

    ELA: Star-Ledger; Communicate; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reflection; Research
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship
    SCI: Environment; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Economics; Natural Characteristics of Place; Resources; Voting

Power and Potential to Make a Difference (12th Grade)

Learners read about and discuss individuals who have made a difference. They review the definition of philanthropy and analyze the characteristics associated with philanthropic acts. They reflect on their own power and potential to make a difference.

  1. Power and Potential to Make a Difference
    (12th Grade)

    ELA: Reading; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Character; Common Good; Giving; Responsibility; Sacrifice; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Inquiry; Opportunity Costs

Public Display of Art (PDA)

Raise awareness that everyone has value, and while differences may lead to intolerance, diversity actually makes society stronger. The learners contribute their artistic talents to advocate for tolerance, non-violence, justice and beauty thus making our world a better place to live.

  1. Tolerance and Non-Violence in Civil Society

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Fact/Opinion; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Prior Knowledge
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Civil Society; Common Good; Giving; Helping; Heroes; Humanitarian; Kindness; Need; Philanthropic Act; Pro-Social Behavior; Reflection; Sensitivity; Sharing; Social Action; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance; Values
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Conflict Resolution; Contemporary Issues; Current Events; Disaster: Human-Made; Ideals/Reality; Location
  2. Tolerance Through My Eyes

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Teamwork
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Civil Society; Common Good; Community; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Service Project; Sharing; Talent; Tolerance; Values
  3. Mirror of Values

    ART: Visual Arts
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Civil Society; Common Good; Community; Cultures; Donate; Giving; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Service; Talent; Tolerance; Values

Quarters From Kids (6-12)

 Learners research problems caused by a weather-related disaster, such as a tsunami. They cite examples of aid and assistance provided in a world-wide effort to help those devastated populations. They may participate in a fundraising campaign and learn about organizations to which they will contribute their funds.

  1. Quarters From Kids-Power, Generosity and Leadership! (6-12)

    ELA: No Man Is an Island; With My Own Two Hands; Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Informational Media; Journaling; Poetry; Reflection; Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Activism; Common Good; Community; Donate; Fundraising; Global Community; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Quarters From Kids; Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Current Events; Disaster: Natural; Economics; Health and Disease; International Economic Organizations; Major World Regions; Presidential Roles; School Community; Tsunami

Rebuilding the Peace—United States Post World War II

Student investigate the effects of government philanthropy and develop an awareness of the role the United States had in recovery after World War II through the Marshall Plan and the establishment of the United Nations. 

  1. Governmental Philanthropy—The Marshall Plan

    ELA: Teamwork; Vocabulary; Voice
    PHIL: Altruism; Foundations; Nonprofit Organization (NGO); Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Chronology; Ethics; Foreign Policy; Interdependence; Marshall Plan (The); World War II
  2. United Nations (The)

    ELA: Audience; Nonverbal Communication; Reflection; Research; Technology; Voice; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Foundations; Nonprofit Organization (NGO); Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Conflict Resolution; Foreign Policy; Inquiry; Interdependence; Primary/Secondary Sources; United Nations; Values

Refugees and Human Rights

Through video, posters, internet, and poetry and other text, students gain understanding about the plight of refugees worldwide and the work of UNHCR. They also develop deeper insight into the refugee experience through critical and creative thinking and participate in activities that encourage them to empathize with those who face the distinct struggles of a refugee and other forcibly displaced persons. They read and discuss the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

  1. Life as a Refugee

    ELA: Personal Response; Visual Media
    PHIL: Empathy; Global Community; Motivation for Giving; Relief
    SOC: 6 genOn; Amendments to Constitution; Developing Countries; Disaster: Human-Made; Human Rights; Nonprofit Organization; Refugees
  2. The Language of Human Rights

    ELA: Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Viewing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Civil Society; Common Good; Responsibility
    SOC: 6 genOn; Amendments to the Constitution; Analyze/Interpret; Global Issues; Human Rights; Refugees
  3. Refugees at Center Stage

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reflection; Role-Play; Teamwork; Viewing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Service
    SOC: 6 genOn; Global Issues; Human Rights; Refugees
  4. Refugee Voices

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Language/Style; Poetry; Voice
    PHIL: Advocacy; Global Community; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service
    SOC: 6 genOn; Global Issues; Refugees

Reporting on an Ideal World (11th Grade)

Learners envision an ideal world characterized by principles of justice, kindness, peace, and tolerance. They demonstrate understanding of these concepts by creating a fictitious newspaper called USA Tomorrow that reports on the ideal world. They will reflect in writing about one step they can take to make an ideal world a reality.
  1. Reporting on an Ideal World (11th Grade)

    ELA: Peer Review; Point of View; Reflection; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Cooperate; Kindness; Tolerance
    SOC: Injustice; Justice

Respecting the Environment (Private-Religious)

The issues facing the world today are not new and have been addressed as early as creation. Through G-d’s laws, Biblical narratives and rabbinic liturgy, one can understand  G-d’s interest in the protection of the environment, animals, land and trees alike, is prominently shown throughout Judaism.

  1. Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Reading; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Benefits; Common Good; Contribute; Environmental Stewardship; Foundations; Helping; Humanitarian; Judaism; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropic Act; Sensitivity; Service Project; Tolerance; Values
    SCI: Animals; Cause/Effect; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Environment
    SOC: Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Decision Making Model; Ethics; Family; Good Character; Laws; Parochial; Personal Virtue; Social Action; Volunteerism
  2. Shemittah - The Sabbatical Year (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Technology
    PHIL: Civil Society; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Judaism; Laws; Religious Perspectives; Values
    SCI: Environment; Food; Land Management; Nature; Terrain
    SOC: Consumption; Land Use; Parochial; Production/Producer; Resources
  3. Trees and Our Future (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Letter Writing; Reflection
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Civil Society; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Ethics; Family; Foundations; Judaism; Laws; Religious Perspectives; Values
    SCI: Earth/Space Science; Ecology; Environment; Food; Land Management; Nature; Plants; Terrain
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Consumption; Land Use; Parochial; Resources

Responsible Energy Use (10th Grade)

Raise the learners' awareness of responsible energy usage in their school. Learners propose ways to promote environmental stewardship of renewable and non-renewable energy sources.

  1. Responsible Energy Use (10th Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Prior Knowledge
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Needs Assessment; Responsibility; Service Plan
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Energy; Environment

Rise of Foundations and Nonprofits (The)

Studnets learn all about nonprofits in their community through annual reports and interviews. They learn about the role of nonprofits and each analyze the goals and work of one nonprofit. As a class, they compile information into a resource that can be used by young people who want to donate time, talent, or treasure to a local agency. 

  1. Foundation, Nonprofit, All Matter to Me

    ELA: Research; Resources; Synthesizing; Technology
    PHIL: Community Foundation; Good Character; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; Personal Virtue; Timelines
  2. Budget, Budget, Who's Got the Budget?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Presentations; Reflection; Resources; Synthesizing
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability
    PHIL: Foundations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Budget; Costs; Income; Inquiry; Research
  3. Let's Get the Story Out There

    ELA: Interview; Journaling; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Survey; Writing Process
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Foundations; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Board of Directors; Career Opportunities; Communities; Inquiry; Volunteerism

Sensitive Side of Philanthropy (The)

This unit explores the theme of philanthropy in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Not only is philanthropy an underlying theme in this work, but promoting sensitivity along with philanthropy provides the students with a contrast for discussing prejudice and racism as major themes within the novel.

  1. Turning on Your Light

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Writing; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Listening; Peer Review; Perception; Research; Response to Text/Others; Viewing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 2 genOn; Common Good; Diversity
  2. What Is Sensitivity?

    ELA: To Kill a Mockingbird; Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Discrimination; Minorities; Racism
  3. Philanthropy, Literature and You

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: To Kill a Mockingbird; Group Discussions; Journaling; Response to Text/Others; Theme
    PHIL: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Reflection; Theme; Universal Themes
  4. Sensitivity, Tolerance and Philanthropy—The Three Amigos!

    ART: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: To Kill a Mockingbird; Group Discussions; Historical Fiction; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Tolerance
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Discrimination; Diversity; Good Character; Minorities; Racism
  5. Special Olympics Service Project (A)

    ELA: To Kill a Mockingbird; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Sensitivity; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Diversity; Special Olympics; Volunteerism

Service Learning for a One-Semester Course

Students will identify the value of philanthropy in society and, working as a group, will plan, carry out and evaluate the success of a one-semester Academic Service-Learning project.

  1. Philanthropy—One Person Can Make a Difference

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Viewing
    PHIL: Common Good; Sacrifice
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Inquiry; Opportunity Costs; Report; Research
  2. Focusing on Issues: Problems, Problems, Everywhere

    ELA: Listening; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Speaking
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Need
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Inquiry; Public Policy; Report; Research
  3. Selecting an Issue—Which Problem Will We Tackle?

    ELA: Media Genres; Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Common Good; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Decision Making Model
  4. Planning the Project—Where Do We Start?

    ELA: Journaling; Media Genres; Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Decision Making Model
  5. Taking Action—Are We Making a Difference Yet?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Problem Solving; Service Plan; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue
  6. Sharing the Results—We Did Make a Difference, Didn't We?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Presentations; Reflection
    PHIL: Problem Solving; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue

Small Steps; Great Journeys (12th Grade)

Students learn the elements of the political process, such as advocating for candidates and current issues. The learners articulate how this action is a demonstration of responsible citizenship and how advocating for one's beliefs is a demonstration of a citizen's rights. Voting is a method to have a voice in the common good of their community and Nation.

  1. Small Steps; Great Journeys (12th Grade)

    PHIL: Advocacy; Community
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities

Social Justice: Here! There! Now! Then!

Learners gain a historical perspective of social injustices (such as racial intolerance) and social needs.  They create an authentic argument for change in a current social justice issue, develop an action plan, and conduct a group service project.

  1. Racial Injustice, Apartheid and the Power of the Individual

    ELA: Personal Response; Point of View; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: 2 genOn; Courage; Justice; Sacrifice; Social Justice; Tolerance
    SOC: Discrimination; Global Issues; Human Rights; Persecution; Racism
  2. JUSTICE and The Jim Crow Laws

    ELA: Expository Text; Fact/Opinion; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Point of View; Reflection; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Advocacy; African American; Civil Society; Discrimination; Fact/Opinion; Justice; Minorities; Social Action; Social Justice; Tolerance
    SOC: Activism; Cause/Effect; Civil Rights; Civil Society; Common Good; Communities; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Desegregation; Freedom; Ideals/Reality; Jim Crow Laws; Persecution; Racism; Slavery; Social Action
  3. Civil Rights Leaders; Past and Present

    ELA: Expository Writing; Inferences/Generalizations; Point of View; Presentations; Reflection; Research; Speaking; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: African American; Common Good; Courage; Human Rights; Justice; Leadership; Minorities; Sacrifice; Social Action; Social Justice; Tolerance; Values
    SOC: Abolition; Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Democratic Values; Desegregation; Discrimination; Equality; Ethics; Freedom; Good Character; Ideals/Reality; Individual Rights; Minorities; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Racism; Slavery; Tolerance
  4. Using Rhetoric to Address Injustice

    ELA: Audience; Brainstorming; Communicate; Expository Writing; Influence; Language/Style; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Research; Speaking; Voice
    PHIL: Common Good; Justice; Social Justice
  5. From Social Injustice/Social Need to Action

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Need; Needs Assessment; Pro-Social Behavior; Service Learning; Service Plan; Service Project; Social Justice
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Cooperative Groups; Current Events; Justice; Social Action

Social Reformer—Jane Addams

Jane Addams addressed social problems by participating constructively in her community and establishing a settlement house in Chicago. Students examine how present-day needs can be addressed. This lesson fits into units on urban growth, industrialization, immigration, and women's history. 

  1. Jane Addams—Philanthropist in Action

    PHIL: Advocacy; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; Addams, Jane; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Immigration; Industrialization (1800-1900); Personal Virtue; Public Policy
  2. Neighbors Helping Neighbors

    PHIL: 3 genOn; Advocacy; Community; Minorities; Need; Volunteer; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; Addams, Jane; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Hull House; Immigration; Industrialization (1800-1900); Personal Virtue; Public Policy; Reform Movements (1801–1861); Urbanization; Voting

Sports Legends and Philanthropy: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (11th)

The learners read about the philanthropic efforts of famous people. They research the work of local philanthropists and use them as a model for their own philanthropic behavior.

 

  1. Sports Heroes and Private Action for the Common Good: Philanthropy Lesson (11th)

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Community; Foundations; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Biography; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Good Character; Inquiry; Minorities; Personal Virtue; Social Action
  2. Impacting the Public Good: Philanthropy Lesson (11th)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Community; Contribute; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Good Character; Minorities; Personal Virtue; Social Action

Sports Legends and Philanthropy—Jackie Robinson, Arthur Ashe, and Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Some people who gain great success choose to act as responsible citizens in a philanthropic way. Using the examples of three famous sports people, students learn how these persons acted as responsible citizens. Students then write an essay or create a visual or song about a celebrity philanthropist. They include plans for their own possible philanthropies.

  1. Sports Heroes and Private Action for the Public Good

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Cultures; Minorities; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 2 genOn; 4 genOn; Ashe, Arthur; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Joyner-Kersee, Jackie; Personal Virtue; Public Policy; Research; Robinson, Jackie
  2. Philanthropy of Sports Heroes and Myself

    ART: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Narrative Writing; Reflection
    PHIL: Cultures; Traditions; Vice Project; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 2 genOn; 4 genOn; Ashe, Arthur; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Joyner-Kersee, Jackie; Presentations; Public Policy; Reflection; Research; Robinson, Jackie

Stand and Deliver for Justice and Diversity (10th Grade)

Learners explore and share their attitudes about diversity and issues of justice and kindness. The learners brainstorm ways that they can promote the common good by working to eliminate stereotyping, intolerance, discrimination, and prejudice.

  1. Stand and Deliver for Justice and Diversity (10th Grade)

    ELA: Questioning; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Understanding; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Friendship; Justice; Respect; Stereotypes; Tolerance; Trust
    SOC: Diversity

Student Voluntarism Symposium

Students define the importance of philanthropy in developing and maintaining our democratic society. They investigate real issues that affect their world, and become involved in identifying and addressing solutions to those problems through volunteering at a nonprofit organization. Students encourage others to volunteer at a student driven symposium.

  1. Democracy, The Common Good, and the Third Sector

    ELA: Theme
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Altruism; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Democracy; Economics
  2. American Philanthropists

    ELA: Media Genres; Presentations; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 10 genOn; Good Character; Inquiry; Personal Virtue
  3. Les Miserables Connection

    ELA: Les Miserable; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Theme
    PHIL: Benefits; Sacrifice
    SOC: 10 genOn
  4. Identifying Community Needs: Choosing and Focusing

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Public Policy
  5. Nonprofit Research and Service Experience

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection
    NONE: Service Learning; Volunteer Service
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good
  6. Symposium

    ELA: Media Genres; Presentations
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good
  7. Reflection and Celebration

    ELA: Portfolio; Reflection
    PHIL: Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn

Superheroes as Philanthropists

Students explore philanthropic themes in the story of Spider-Man and other comics. This provides the spark to generate solutions to real-world problems by researching a social issue and taking action such as writing letters to lawmakers, volunteering at agencies, and using media to educate others.

  1. Teaching "Theme" with Children's Literature

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Plot Development; Theme
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 9/11genOn; Altruism; Enlightened Self-Interest; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Group Discussions
  2. Identifying Themes in Spider-Man and the Seven Motivations for Giving

    ELA: Spider Man; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Theme; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Altruism; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: 10 genOn
  3. Preparation and Presentation of Superhero Philanthropists

    ELA: Presentations; Theme
    PHIL: Heroes; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 10 genOn
  4. Discussion of Superheroes' Roles in Our Culture
    and How Americans View Philanthropy

    ELA: Archetypes
    PHIL: Heroes
    SOC: 10 genOn; Cultures
  5. Becoming a Superhero

    ELA: Letter Writing; Reflection; Research; Synthesizing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Heroes; Service Project; Social Action
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Inquiry

Surviving Auschwitz (9-12)

This lesson focuses on two young Jewish survivors of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the Nazi death camp.  As they return to their home town and the concentration camp, they each tell their story and explain why they were willing to return to such an emotionally devastating place. Their story is replete with examples of heroism and concern for others in the face of unspeakable sorrow. 
  1. Surviving Auschwitz (9-12)

    ELA: Letter Writing; Retelling
    PHIL: Family; Sacrifice
    SOC: Holocaust; Oral History; Surviving Auschwitz; Tolerance

Surviving the Depression—1930-1939

Through primary documents, students read about the impact and importance of philanthropy during The Great Depression in bringing the country back to its original strength and building community capital. Students learn about economics and daily life, and identify solutions that brought the country out of the Depression. 

  1. Life During the Depression—Pictures

    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Great Depression; Primary/Secondary Sources
  2. Life During the Depression—Stories

    PHIL: Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Hard Times; Analyze/Interpret; Economics; Good Character; Government; Great Depression; Interview; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources
  3. Solutions to the Depression

    PHIL: Foundations; Social Capital
    SOC: Community Capital; Economics; Good Character; Great Depression; New Deal; Nonprofit; Personal Virtue; Public Policy

Taking a Stand for the Good of Others (12th Grade)

Students read about Rosa Parks and her philanthropic act in the form of protesting an unjust/unfair situation. Students analyze violent situations and propose nonviolent solutions.

  1. Taking a Stand for the Good of Others (12th Grade)

    ELA: Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Understanding; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Justice; Trust
    SOC: Civil Rights; Equality; Primary/Secondary Sources; Rights/Responsibilities

Talk the Talk, Walk the Walk (12th Grade)

Learners explore what it means to demonstrate civic virtues of justice, kindness, peace, and tolerance as responsible citizens. The students write a goal to practice one of the virtues.

  1. Talk the Talk, Walk the Walk (12th Grade)

    ELA: Point of View; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Kindness; Tolerance
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Injustice; Justice

The Carter Center and Volunteerism

The lessons focus on the Carter Center and President James Carter's volunteer activities as model for responsible citizenship. Students also examine how volunteerism and responsible citizenship are linked.

  1. Think Locally, Act Globally or Think Globally, Act Locally?

    PHIL: Hunger; Poverty; Problem Solving; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Carter, Jimmy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Declaration of Independence; Global Issues; Habitat for Humanity; Inflation; Jimmy Carter Center; Public Policy; Unemployment
  2. Jimmy Carter—Responsible Citizen

    ELA: Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Global Community; Homelessness; Poverty; Problem Solving; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Carter, Jimmy; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Chronology; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Global Issues; Good Character; Habitat for Humanity; Historical Biographies; Inflation; Personal Virtue; Public Policy; Unemployment

Thinking "Glocally" (10th Grade)

 We can address global issues by working for change at both a personal as well as at a local level. The lesson addresses the need to exercise civic responsibility in promoting the common good in order to realize a more civil society.

  1. Thinking "Glocally" (10th Grade)

    ELA: Listening
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Giving; Personal Virtue; Responsibility

Tikkun Olam (Private-Religious)

The purpose of this unit is to provide practical insight into the dilemmas of creation, an examination of theoretical social areas needing improvement and presenting solutions in those areas utilizing tikkun olam.

  1. Why Should We Fix the World? (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Civil Society; Common Good; Judaism; Justice; Pro-Social Behavior; Social Action; Tolerance; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Laws; Parochial; Point of View; Religion; Social Action
  2. A Quick Fix (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection; Teamwork; Writing
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Civil Society; Common Good; Judaism; Justice; Pro-Social Behavior; Social Action; Tolerance; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Laws; Parochial; Point of View; Religion
  3. Taking Action (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Civil Society; Common Good; Judaism; Justice; Pro-Social Behavior; Social Action; Tolerance; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Laws; Parochial; Point of View; Religion

Time Traveler - Intergenerational Interviews

Students conduct interviews with older adults to learn about past events, traditions, and individual service in their local community. They then present the information to younger students or community members.  This is a good unit to use with a video production class.  

  1. Back to the Future

    ELA: Point of View; Prior Knowledge
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Family; Sharing; Traditions
    SOC: 10 genOn; Family; Point of View; Primary/Secondary Sources
  2. What We Can Learn From Oral History

    PHIL: Civil Society; Common Good; Heroes; Social Contract
    SOC: 10 genOn; Cause/Effect; Civil Society; Common Good; Great Depression; Personal Virtue; Social Contract; War
  3. Your Own Flash from the Past

    ELA: Reflection
    PHIL: Sharing; Values
    SOC: 10 genOn; Contemporary Issues; Personal Virtue; Writing Historical Narratives
  4. The Interview

    ELA: Interview; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Sharing; Traditions; Values
    SOC: 10 genOn; Contemporary Issues; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Research; Writing Historical Narratives
  5. Interview Presentation and Reflection

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Presentations; Reflection; Retelling; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: Common Good; Pro-Social Behavior; Reflection; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Public Policy; Writing Historical Narratives

To Recycle or Not to Recycle? That Shouldn't Even Be a Question!

Learners explore the concept of environmental stewardship and the role they can play in helping to make their home, school, community, and world a better place through recycling.

  1. Just the Facts, Madam!

    ELA: Point of View; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Pollution
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Economics; Ideals/Reality; Inquiry; Research; Resources
  2. If There's a Profile, Let's Work with It!

    ART: Visual Arts
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling; Service Project; Stewardship; Volunteer
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Pollution
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Economics; Ideals/Reality; Inquiry; Research; Resources
  3. What's Next?

    ART: Visual Arts
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling; Reflection; Service Project; Stewardship; Volunteer
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Pollution
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Economics; Ideals/Reality; Inquiry; Research; Resources

Tolerance (Private-Religious)

Learners will define the term tolerance and examine their reactions to given social situations that call for tolerance. They will examine the ethical foundations of tolerance from the Torah and understand what it means in both the religious and social context. Using what they have learned, they will  identify situations that call for tolerance in their daily lives and implement a plan of action.

  1. Towards a Definition (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Ethics; Group Discussions; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Altruism; Cooperate; Empathy; Ennobled Self; Friendship; Judaism; Justice; Kindness; Religious Perspective; Sensitivity; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Advocacy; Cultures; Parochial; Tolerance
  2. What Does Judaism Say About Tolerance? (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Debate; Ethics; Group Discussions; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Altruism; Cooperate; Empathy; Ennobled Self; Friendship; Judaism; Justice; Kindness; Religious Perspective; Sensitivity; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Advocacy; Cultures; Parochial; Tolerance
  3. Using Our Skills (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Group Discussions; Role-Play; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Altruism; Cooperate; Empathy; Ennobled Self; Friendship; Judaism; Justice; Kindness; Perspective; Religious; Sensitivity; Service Plan; Service Project; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Advocacy; Cultures; Parochial; Tolerance

Treating Others as You Would Like to be Treated
(11th Grade)

The learners analyze many variations of the Golden Rule and relate it to the concept of philanthropy and the words of Martin Luther King, Jr.

  1. Treating Others as You Would Like to Be Treated
    (11th Grade)

    ELA: Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Justice; Respect
    SOC: Golden Rule; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights

Understanding Justice, Kindness and Tolerance
(9th Grade)

Lack of awareness plays a role in perpetuating racism and prejudice. Learners identify ways they can advocate for tolerance, justice, and kindness.

  1. Understanding Justice, Kindness and Tolerance
    (9th Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Justice; Respect; Stereotypes

Using and Abusing Credit

Introduce the complex economic world of credit and credit cards. The learners identify the intended uses as well as the abuses of credit and credit cards and explore ways to responsibly spend, save, invest, and donate as their needs and wants become known. 

  1. Where Does All the Money Go?

    MAT: Infer; Interpret
    PHIL: Donate; Personal Giving Plan
    SOC: Budget; Compare/Contrast; Economics; Resource Allocation; Spending; Wants/Needs
  2. Credit Introduction

    ELA: Interview
    MAT: Money; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Donate
    SOC: Budget; Consumers; Contemporary Issues; Costs; Economics; Goods and Services; Personal Giving Plan; Resource Allocation; Spending; Wants/Needs
  3. Installment Credit

    MAT: Money; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Pro-Social Behavior
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Consumers; Contemporary Issues; Costs; Economics; Spending
  4. Credit Cards

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Service Project
    SOC: Consumers; Contemporary Issues; Costs; Spending

Valuing Community (9th Grade)

Learners will define community, community capital, and serial reciprocity as a discussion starter about the importance of civic participation in making the community better through volunteerism. 

  1. Valuing Community (9th Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Community; Community Capital; Giving; Reflection; Serial Reciprocity; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: Community; Family; Human Capital; Inquiry; Public Policy; Social Action

Volunteering - Why Is it So Important?
(11th Grade)

The learners explore characteristics of "For-Profit" and "Not-for-Profit" businesses and organizations. They identify the role of volunteerism and research the incentives often used to attract volunteers. They will use this information to promote student volunteerism. 

  1. Volunteering - Why is it so Important? (11th Grade)

    ELA: Listening
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Philanthropic Organization; Responsibility; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; For-Profit; Good Character; Nonprofit; Personal Virtue; Responsibility; Volunteerism

Voting and the Common Good (10th Grade)

Learners examine the statistics of voter turnout in the Federal Elections and from these statistics the learners draw some comparative conclusions.

  1. Voting and the Common Good (10th Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Community
    SOC: Communities; Political Process

What is "Real" Hunger? (9th Grade)

The learners develop a greater understanding of hunger and malnutrition and explore ones responsibility to share unevenly distributed food resources.

  1. What Is "Real" Hunger? (9th Grade)

    ELA: Listening
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Responsibility

What Will You Bring to the Table? (9-12)

Students carry out a food simulation in which they discover that while there is enough food produced in the United States to feed everyone, access to food is not equal or fair. They investigate the issue of hunger locally and nationally and then plan a service project with the theme "What Will You Bring to the Table?" Students become aware that working together as a group and in partnership with nonprofit and community groups can help them make a difference as they advocate for some of the children in the United States who go to bed hungry.

  1. What Will You Bring?

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Communicate; Concept Mapping; Fact/Opinion; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas; Interview; Key Ideas and Details; Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas; Presentations; Reading Informational Text; Reflection
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Community; Hunger; Needs Assessment; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 11 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Economics; Geography; Global Issues; Government; Nonprofit; Opportunity Cost; Research

What's My Civic Responsibility? (11th Grade)

 The learners define and explain the importance of civic engagement and responsible citizenship. They explore the reasons why people may hesitate to become involved in solving problems and consider ways in which they can be "part of the solution" rather than a "part of the problem." 

  1. What's My Civic Responsibility? (11th Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Common Good; Community
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities

Who Am I and How Does This Impact Where I Am
Going?

Learners use self-assessment activities to explore their future career choices, including the nonprofit sector. Students explore the for-profit and nonprofit career sectors and find out how being personally involved in philanthropic ventures benefits them, their communities, the economy, and the world.

  1. Who Am I Today?

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Brainstorming; Character Development; Group Discussions; Poetry; Self Assessment
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; Character; Philanthropic Organization
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Economics; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. Who Will I Be Tomorrow?

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Interpret; Perception; Point of View; Self Assessment; Speaking
    PHIL: Character; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Behavior; Career Opportunities; Communicate; Ethics; Values
  3. How Can I Help You?

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Reflection; Self Assessment; Speaking
    PHIL: Character; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Communicate; Ethics; Values

Whose Job Is It?

Students differentiate between needs and wants and explore how needs are met in different contexts and with help from different sectors. In this unit students integrate learning of economic systems, governmental systems, and the role of nonprofits to create a reference poster for use in a social studies classroom.

  1. Who, What, Where, When, and Why

    ELA: Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Need
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Democracy; Dictatorship; Economics; Government; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  2. It's Symbolic!

    ELA: Interview; Listening; Media Genres; Metaphor; Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Symbols/Images/Sounds
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; Economics; Government; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  3. Personal Touch (The)

    ELA: Media Genres; Presentations
    PHIL: Nonprofit
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; Inquiry; Research; Wants/Needs
  4. Presenting!

    ELA: Presentations; Reflection; Research
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; Economics; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs

Whose Responsibility Is It? (9th Grade)

The learners explore the four economic sectors and the responsibility to care for the environment. They determine how they are responsible for environmental stewardship and create a plan for what they can do to help.

  1. Whose Responsibility Is It? (9th Grade)

    PHIL: Activism; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Service Plan; Social Action
    SCI: Conservation
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Disaster: Human-Made; Economics; Environment; For-Profit; Government; Ideals/Reality; Natural Resources; Pollution; Rights/Responsibilities

Why Eat Organic? (9th Grade)

The learner will develop an awareness of organic/sustainable foods as an alternative, earth-friendly way to eat. This lesson encourages the learners to evaluate their choices when they and their families purchase food products. Students identify how organic/sustainable foods contribute to their health as well as the health of our world.

  1. Why Eat Organic? (9th Grade)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Expository Writing; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Teamwork; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Benefits; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Global Community; Opportunity Costs; Responsibility
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Ecology; Environment; Food; Health; Land Management; Nutrition; Plants

Women in Philanthropy

Students learn about the philanthropy of Madam C.J. Walker, successful African American business woman, who supported many causes with the profits of her business. They examine their talents and interests and suggest how they themselves might take philanthropic action.

  1. Madam C.J. Walker—Leader in Philanthropy and Successful Business Woman

    ELA: Inquiry; Research
    PHIL: Do Something; 3 lesson genOn; Cultures; Nonprofit Sector; Personal Wealth; Women
    SOC: Plessy v. Ferguson; 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 2 genOn; African American; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; Discrimination; Ethics; Good Character; Human Rights; Inquiry; Jim Crow Laws; Minorities; Nonprofit; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Racism; Research; Segregation; Walker, Madam C.J.

Worth a Thousand Words

Provide learners with a deeper understanding of the Special Olympics and those who participate in it, valuing diversity as a strength. Students may seek opportunities to get involved as a volunteer providing a needed service, directly with the participants, indirectly through fundraising or providing support, or through advocacy.

  1. Opening Ceremonies in the Classroom

    PHIL: Civil Society; Common Good; Helping; Pro-Social Behavior; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Diversity
    SOC: Contemporary Issues; Economics; School Community
  2. Getting Ready for the Games

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Reflection
    PHIL: Common Good; Pro-Social Behavior; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Technology
    SOC: School Community
  3. Capturing the Olympic Moment

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Reflection
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; Helping; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Technology
    SOC: School Community
  4. Closing Ceremonies

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Reflection
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; Helping; Philanthropic Act; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Advocacy; Communities; Consensus; School Community

Writers as Activists

In this unit students will learn about the power of writing for creating positive social change by studying writers who use their writing as a means of activism and by using those same tools to become activist writers themselves. Writing used as a form of philanthropy can empower even the most disenfranchised.

  1. Fable for Tomorrow and Today—Rachel Carson's Silent Spring (A)

    ELA: Carson, Rachel; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Good Character; Philanthropic Act; Stewardship
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Disaster: Human-Made; Environment; Health and Disease; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Values
  2. Mary Eliza Church Terrell-Civil Rights Leader

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Reading; Terrell, Mary Eliza Church
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; African American; Common Good; Minorities; Women
    SOC: Discrimination; Human Rights; Racism
  3. "Anything We Love Can Be Saved"-A Contemporary

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Persuasive Techniques; Reading
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Minorities; Women
    SOC: Chronology; Time
  4. Writing for Action

    ELA: Letter Writing; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Style; Technology; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Inquiry; Primary/Secondary Sources; Public Policy

Your Place in the Community

Learners identify and explore their own values as well as the values of their family, classroom, school, neighborhood and the community. Learners realize that they are concurrently members of multiple communities that may have competing or conflicting value systems. Learners gain important insights about being respectful of diversity. 

  1. Your Place in the Community

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Reading; Self Assessment; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Altruism; Community; Empathy
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Diversity; Inquiry; Public Policy; Values
  2. Developing a Sense of Self

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Data Collection/Organization; Group Discussions; Survey
    PHIL: Community
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Inquiry; Values
  3. Valuable Data?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Survey
    MAT: Analyze/Interpret; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Spreadsheet/Data Base; Technology
    PHIL: Community
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Inquiry
  4. Treasure of Community Service (A)

    ELA: Journaling; Perception; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Nonprofit Organization; Service Project; Social Action; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Inquiry; Maps; Research

Your Place in the Community (10th Grade)

Learners identify their personal values/beliefs and compare them to the values/beliefs of their peers. They discuss how their values influence their decisions about personal action for the common good.
  1. Your Place in the Community (10th Grade)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Self Assessment; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Survey
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Community; Fact/Opinion; Motivation for Giving; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Inquiry; Volunteerism