Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement


Lesson Plans
K-2 Units 3-5 Units 6-8 Units 9-12 Units
Unit Title & Purpose Lesson Titles & Key Words Grades

"Antsy" for Others

The purpose of this unit is to teach students to see the world from another’s point of view and to recognize the importance of respect.

What is the meaning of respect and how do you show respect for others?

  1. Ants Have Feelings, Too!

    ELA: Point of View; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Empathy; Kindness; Respect
    SCI: Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Nature
    SOC: 1 genOn; Good Character; Values
  2. Anty-Bodies

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Character; Community; Respect; Service Learning
    SOC: 1 genOn; Communities; Good Character
  3. Ant-Like Antics

    ART: Dance; Music
    ELA: Listening; Speaking
    PHIL: Respect
    SCI: Animals
    SOC: 1 genOn
K-2

Baking Bread for Childhood Hunger

 In this lesson, students define philanthropy and discover how philanthropy can be creative and encompass many different talents and treasures. Students learn about the problem of childhood hunger and the needs in their own community. To address these financial needs, students will bake and sell homemade bread to their community in order to raise money to be donated to their local meal-provision organization.

 
Focus Question: How can young people make a difference with childhood hunger in our community?
  1. Baking Bread for Childhood Hunger

    ELA: Informational Media; Letter Writing; Reflection; Writing Type and Purpose
    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Fundraising; Hunger
    SOC: For-Profit; Nonprofit; Volunteers
K-2

Bare Necessities - Helping Others (Kindergarten)

This lesson will help students identify a person’s basic needs, realize that many people in the world are lacking these needs and why this may occur, and encourage them to think of ways to help these people.

  1. Bare Necessities-Helping Others (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Listening; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue
K-2

Beautiful Me

Students will understand that they have the ability to be philanthropist in their community.  The students will be guided in philanthropic discussions throughout the unit that clearly define philanthropy as the giving of time, talent, and treasure for the common good. Students learn that they can create a beautiful community through cleaning up, helping others, sharing songs, using kind words, creating public art, and much more. 

  1. Cleaning Up

    ELA: Story Elements; Teamwork
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Philanthropic Act; School Climate; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Pollution
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Pollution
  2. Do Something Beautiful

    ELA: Something Beautiful; Compare/Contrast; Journaling; Point of View; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Stewardship; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Good Character
  3. Sharing Beauty Through Song

    ART: Music
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Journaling; Teamwork
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Sensitivity; Volunteer
  4. Making a Choice

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Character Development; Main Idea; Response to Text/Others; Writing Process
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Literature; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character
  5. Make Something Beautiful

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Reflection; Speaking; Teamwork
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act
K-2

Buckets of Bucks for World Hunger

Through literature and simulation, learners gain an understanding of  the concept of hunger and what they can do about it. Students learn about nutrition and counting money as they define hunger and collect loose change to donate to an organization of their choice. Students create "Stop Hunger Buckets" and initiate a school-wide collection of loose change. The proceeds are donated to a nonprofit organization that feeds people who are hungry.

Focus Question: What can we do about the issue of hunger in a world of uneven distribution of resources?

  1. Just Say "Know" to World Hunger

    ELA: Concept Mapping; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    MAT: Comparing Numbers
    PHIL: Common Good; Donate; Empathy; Fundraising; Hunger; Philanthropist
    SOC: Consensus; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Health and Disease; Human Rights; Maps/Globes
  2. One Coin at a Time

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Brainstorming; Communicate; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Role-Play; Speaking; Teamwork
    MAT: Addition; Counting; Money
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Donate; Empathy; Helping; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service
    SCI: Nutrition
    SOC: Advocacy; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues; Incentives; Wants/Needs
  3. Let's Show What We Know

    ART: Music; Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Narrative Writing; Presentations; Retelling; Role-Play; Speaking; Vocabulary
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: Donate; Family; Fundraising; Hunger; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Communities; Nonprofit
K-2

Buzzing is BEE-lieving

The students respond to text and apply the principles of believing in oneself and being kind to others within the community.  The purpose of this unit is to build self esteem, promote responsible citizenship and encourage philanthropic behaviors.

In what ways do students positively or negatively affect their community?

  1. What's All the Buzz About?

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Buzzy the Bumblebee; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Speaking; Understanding/Interpretation
    MAT: Patterns
    PHIL: Family; Philanthropic Act
  2. Insect Investigator

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Questioning
    MAT: Classify; Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    SCI: Compare/Contrast; Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Inquiry; Nature
  3. Buzzing into the Community

    ART: Music; Skills; Visual Arts
    ELA: Buzzy the Bumblebee; Communicate; Listening; Presentations; Speaking; Universal Themes; Writing
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Reflection; Respect; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 2 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Partnership; School Community; Volunteerism
  4. BEE a Part of Our Community

    ELA: Buzzy the Bumblebee; Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Listening
    PHIL: Kindness; Reflection; Respect; Social Capital; Time/Talent/Treasure; Trust
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities
K-2

Can You Lend Me a Hand? (Kindergarten)

Students will listen and respond to the story of The Little Red Hen. The concepts of community and working together for the betterment of the community will be developed.

  1. Can You Lend Me a Hand? (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Listening; Retelling
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; Community
    SOC: Communities; School Community
K-2

Caring About the Community

The purpose of this unit is to promote the idea of the common good.  The concepts of wants, needs, savings and philanthropy are introduced. Money values are reinforced through hands-on activities.

  1. The Wants and Needs of Making a Difference

    ELA: Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Family; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 8 genOn; Common Good; Neighborhood; Wants/Needs
  2. Saving Makes Cents

    ELA: Understanding/Interpretation
    MAT: Classify; Money
    PHIL: Common Good; Donate; Family; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 8 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Costs; Family; Wants/Needs
  3. Kids Can Make The Difference

    ELA: Three Questions (The); Brainstorming; Journaling; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 8 genOn; Common Good; Communities
K-2

Catch Her If You Can! (2nd Grade)

Learners will illustrate how Jackie Joyner-Kersee is a motivator, both as an athlete and a philanthropist. She demonstrated acts of kindness for the common good through building youth centers across the nation.

  1. Catch Her If You Can! (2nd Grade)

    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; African American; Career Opportunities; Foundations; Kindness; Time/Talent/Treasure; Women; Youth Club
    SOC: Common Good; Foundations; Historical Biographies; Joyner-Kersee, Jackie
K-2

Children Changing Hunger

 Through literature and discussion, students recognize that hunger is an issue in their community that they can do something about. Students brainstorm ways they can take action to address the needs of children who are hungry in their community. Students hold a food collection and use math and writing skills to analyze their collection.

  1. Packing a Sack Supper

    ELA: Communicate; Reading Literature; Reflection; Story Mapping; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Community; Contributions; Giving; Philanthropist
    SCI: Data Collection/Organization; Nutrition
    SOC: Scarcity; Wants/Needs
K-2

Cinderella Project

The students identify the examples of philanthropy, such as common good, kindness, and giving, in several related texts.  They compare and contrast the story elements in different versions of the Cinderella story.  Children experience the rewards of giving through a service-learning project.
  1. Steps of Kindness

    ELA: Brainstorming; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Voice; Writing Process
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Donate; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: 12 genOn; Good Character; Wants/Needs
  2. Searching for Stars

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 12 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Good Character; Maps
  3. Cinderella Is A Fella

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Main Idea; Prior Knowledge; Story Elements; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Kindness
    SOC: 12 genOn; Cultures; Maps
  4. Final Steps

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Letter Writing; Presentations; Reflection; Writing Process
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Fundraising; Philanthropic Act; Reflection
    SOC: 12 genOn
K-2

Cinderella Stories (The)

The purpose is to recognize fairy tales/legends as literature genre and to identify positive and negative character traits.

Focus questions:

  1. What is good character?
  2. Why are the lessons in fairy tales found in stories from all different cultures?
  1. Cinderella

    ELA: Cinderella; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Concept Mapping; Genre; Response to Text/Others; Retelling; Story Elements; Story Mapping; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Family; Reflection; Selflessness; Service
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Good Character
  2. African Tale (An)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Retelling; Universal Themes
    PHIL: African American; Kindness
    SOC: Common Good; Maps
  3. Native American Legend (A)

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Rough-Face Girl (The); Brainstorming; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Creative Writing; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Story Elements
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Good Character; Native Peoples
K-2

Citizenship

Core Democratic Values will be introduced and explored in a way that helps the students relate them to their own experience. Through the book Coming To America, the history of how and why people came to America is explained. The students will conclude that people came to America to enjoy the rights held by American citizens.
  1. Ancestors

    ELA: Retelling
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Pluralism
    SOC: Coming to America; 1 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Diversity; History to 1620; Human Characteristics of Place; Immigration; Liberty; Maps; Timelines
  2. We Have Rights

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Community
    SOC: 1 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Bill of Rights; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Immigration; Justice; Liberty; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. Community Chain

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Good Character; Justice; Liberty; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law
  4. What We Can Do!

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Lorax (The); Listening; Retelling
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Common Good
    SOC: 1 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Environment; Natural Resources
K-2

Community Collaboration

Students investigate how to improve their community through beautification. They assess the needs of their neighborhood and graph and chart data collected from family interviews. Students develop an understanding of community partnerships and define community organization. The students will unfold the answers to the following essential questions:

  • What are the needs in your neighborhood?
  • What community organizations address these needs?
  • How can we address the needs of the area? 
  1. Neighborhood Vision

    ELA: Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Survey
    PHIL: Community; Family; Needs Assessment; Neighborhood; Reflection
    SOC: 8 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Economic Sectors; Nonprofit
  2. Match Needs and Helpers

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Community Helpers; 8 genOn; Common Good; Nonprofit; Partnership; Wants/Needs
  3. Project Collaboration

    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Cooperate; Philanthropic Act; Service
    SOC: 8 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Nonprofit; Partnership
K-2

Community Helpers—Mail and Meals

Students will become familiar with the definition of philanthropy and see examples of it in the community, especially in connection with the United Way.  

  1. Joining Community Helpers

    ELA: Interview; Letter Writing; Listening
    PHIL: Donate; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 8 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Community; Giving; Goods and Services; Government; Maps; Reflection; Sharing; United Way; Values
K-2

Compliments Can Change the World! (2nd Grade)

  1. Compliments Can Change the World! (2nd Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Non-Fiction Literature; Questioning; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Understanding; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Justice
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Diversity; Equality; Good Character; Inquiry; Rights/Responsibilities
K-2

Different! Diverse! Dynamic! (K-2)

The purpose of this unit is to increase students’ awareness of the differences among us. Through identification of and participation in service activities, the students will gain a better understanding of others’ unique characteristics. Acceptance of individual differences and understanding of developmental differences is the overarching behavior outcome of the unit. The unit strives to instill the concept of tolerance to enhance the common good.

  1. Late Bloomers (K-2)

    ELA: Reading; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Numbers
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Respect
    SCI: Heredity
    SOC: 8 genOn; Common Good; Diversity; Good Character; Timelines; Tolerance; Values
  2. Teaching Peace through Literature and Song (K-2)

    ART: Music: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Thank You, Mr. Falker; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Theme
    PHIL: Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Discrimination; Diversity; Human Rights
  3. What Do Stories Share? (K-2)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Theme; Writing Process
    PHIL: Respect
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Tolerance
  4. Looks Like Respect, Sounds Like Respect, Feels Like (K-2)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Constructing Meaning
    PHIL: Respect
    SOC: Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity; Ethics; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Values
  5. I Feel Angry or Sad When… (K-2)

    ART: Theater: Interdisciplinary; Theater: Perform
    PHIL: Altruism; Cooperate; Empathy; Ennobled Self; Selflessness
    SOC: Common Good; Ethics; Good Character; Rule of Law; Tolerance
  6. Is There a Stone in My Soup? (K-2)

    ELA: Stone Soup; Interview; Writing Process
    MAT: Estimation; Numbers; Patterns
    PHIL: Cooperate; Giving; Need; Reflection; Respect; Survey; Tolerance
    SOC: Common Good; Diversity; Rules; Volunteerism
K-2

Disaster Relief - You Can Count On Me! (K-2)

This lesson will introduce learners to opportunities to respond to a natural disaster. The lesson will introduce vocabulary terms spend, save and donate. The students will learn the definition of philanthropy (giving time, talent and treasure, and taking action for the common good) as well as explore reasons why people choose to donate. As a class, they will discuss and sing the song "What is a Philanthropist?"

Focus Question: How can we be most helpful to the victims of a major disaster, such as a hurricane or earthquake?

To access this lesson, please click here.

  1. Disaster Relief - You Can Count On Me! (K-2)

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    ELA: Sam and the Lucky Money; Listening; Literature; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Counting; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Donate; Emergency Response; Giving; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Disaster: Natural; Maps
K-2

Diverse Community: Who Is My Neighbor? (K-2)

Children play a game to build understanding of personal strengths and cooperative work. They discuss what behaviors promote cooperation and communication. They start thinking about how cooperation can help the common good of their neighborhood. Read aloud and discuss a story to build understanding of personal strengths and cooperative work. The group defines neighbors to include the people they learn and work with, live near, and share the world with. The children work cooperatively to make a paper quilt displaying the strengths of the group as they make the neighborhood a better place. They brainstorm their personal strengths and needs of the community and make a plan to take action for the common good.

  1. Cooperation Game

    ELA: Communicate; Teamwork
    PHIL: Cooperate; Neighborhood
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Cooperative Groups
  2. Working Together in the Neighborhood

    ELA: Language/Style; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Need; Neighborhood
    SOC: Common Good; Community; Global Issues
  3. Helping Neighbors

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Communicate; Letter Writing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Cooperate; Donate; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Common Good; Cooperative Groups
K-2

Dr. Martin Luther King, Junior - His Life, His Legacy

In this unit students learn about the life and actions of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the name of civil rights. Students define philanthropy and give examples of how Dr. King was a philanthropist. The students experience a simulation of unequal treatment and discuss fairness. Children reflect on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream and personalize a way to act out his dream. Students analyze the importance of physical characteristics and characteristics of character.

  • Why is it important to treat all people fairly?

  • In what ways can we carry on MLK’s dream?
  1. The Man, The Dream

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: My Dream of Martin Luther King; Picture Book of Martin Luther King, Jr. (A); Biography; Journaling; Listening; Reflection
    PHIL: Activism; African American; Giving; Heroes; Justice; Leadership; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Common Good; Good Character; Justice; MLK
  2. Reaching to the Clouds for Equality

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Martin's Big Words: Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (The); Biography; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Journaling; Listening; Personal Response; Reflection; Role-Play; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Activism; African American; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn
  3. The Many Shades of Our World

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Listening; Personal Response; Poetry; Speaking
    PHIL: Common Good; Respect; Sensitivity
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Discrimination; Equality
  4. Bringing Us Together

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Listening; Personal Response; Speaking; Writing
    PHIL: Common Good; Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Common Good; Equality; Good Character
K-2

Drumming from the Heart

The purpose of this lesson is to have students identify the shared gifts in the folktale, "The Drum" and make drums using different recyclable containers and colorful craft supplies. Students visit a local preschool or retirement facility of their choosing to read aloud a book they wrote and illustrated about generous giving. They share a drumming performance and give the drums and books as gifts.

Focus Question: What gifts of time, talent, and treasure can I give to meet the needs of another person?
 
  1. Learning the Beat

    ELA: Drum (The); Character Development; Chronology; Compare/Contrast; Folktales; Listening; Questioning; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Ordinal/Cardinal Numbers
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Empathy; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Economics; Wants/Needs
  2. Beat by Beat

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Drum (The); Audience; Creative Writing; Folktales; Reading; Retelling; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Donate; Needs Assessment; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Volunteerism
  3. Sharing the Beat

    ART: Music; Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Drum (The); Audience; Communicate; Folktales; Presentations; Reflection; Retelling; Speaking; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; Donate; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities; Volunteerism
K-2

Earth Day for a Small World (2nd Grade)

  1. Earth Day for a Small World (2nd Grade)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Earth and I (The); Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Environment; Natural Resources
K-2

Earth Keepers

Learners will learn how to become environmental stewards by participating in several service learning activities that help address environmental needs in their school communities. They will gain an understanding of the importance of environmental stewardship and how they can participate. Learners will also understand that they are part of a whole and that they have a responsibility to participate in caring for the Earth.

Focus Questions:
Why does the world need environmental stewards?
What do we have to give for what we have been given?

  1. Watercolor Ways

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Main Idea; Reflection
    PHIL: Stewardship; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Environmental Stewardship; Global Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Literature; Recycling; Social Action
    SOC: Environment; Maps/Globes; Physical Characteristics of Place
  2. Beginning At Home

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Great Trash Bash (The); Wartville Wizard (The); Listening; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Group Discussions; Pollution
  3. The Great School Clean-Up

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling; Social Action; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Environment; Volunteerism
K-2

Environment: Sustaining Our World (K-2)

This unit helps students recognize that they belong to a global community that shares resources and interests. Learners define "commons" and understand the difference between common resources and private property.  Learners define stewardship and exhibit responsibility by helping to care for our “small world.” They will respond to the story The Earth and I by Frank Asch by creating watercolor illustrations of themselves acting as environmental stewards. They will decide on a class service project, plan, take action and reflect on their service experience.

  1. It Is a Small World

    PHIL: ; 4 genOn; Commons; Community
    SOC: Geography; Resources,Maps/Globes
  2. There Is So Much to Share

    PHIL: Enlightened Self-Interest; Stewardship
    SOC: Environment
  3. Taking Care of the Earth

    ART: Visual Arts
    PHIL: Stewardship
    SOC: Common Good; Environment
K-2

Flowers and a Beautiful World (1st Grade)

The learners will appreciate that insects have specific attributes and needs. They will appreciate the concept of life cycles. They will come to realize that the Monarch Butterfly is dependent on the milkweed plant for its survival.  The class will plant nectar-producing flowers, as well as milkweed, in a school garden and/or various locations in order to help preserve the Monarch Butterfly. They will understand that enhancing and caring for the environment is the civic responsibility of all people.

This unit demonstrates to the learners that by enhancing and caring for the environment they are demonstrating acts of philanthropy and that environmental stewardship is the civic responsibility of everyone. Learners will be introduced to the specific attributes, needs and the life cycle of the Monarch Butterfly and learn how it is dependent on the milkweed plant for survival.

  1. Flowers and a Beautiful World (1st Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Character Development; Group Discussions; Main Idea; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Literature; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: Common Good
K-2

Freedom, Fairness and Philanthropy—Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks and Jackie Joyner-Kersee

The stories of Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks and Jackie Joyner-Kersee are used to teach the concept of philanthropy. The giving of time and talent are exemplified by the stories of Harriet Tubman and Rosa Parks. Students learn about the Underground Railroad and the injustices of slavery. The birth of the modern civil rights movement is also shown through the story of Rosa Parks and the bus boycott. The idea of philanthropy as giving of your treasure is made clear through Jackie Joyner-Kersee’s biography. These three women model bravery, determination and selflessness while living in a world in which the odds were against them.
  1. Harriet Tubman

    ELA: Biography; Perception
    PHIL: 2 genOn; Common Good; Family; Heroes; Minorities; Philanthropic Act; Selflessness; Trust
    SOC: Abolition; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Diverse Communities; Equality; Freedom; Liberty; Minorities; Slavery; Tubman, Harriet; Underground Railroad
  2. This is Rosa Parks

    ART: Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Biography; Compare/Contrast
    PHIL: Activism; African American; Common Good; Community; Heroes
    SOC: Civil Rights; Communities; Laws; Parks, Rosa; Racism; Tubman, Harriet
  3. Jackie Joyner-Kersee

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Biography
    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: African American; Career Opportunities; Foundations; Time/Talent/Treasure; Women; Youth Club
    SOC: Common Good; Foundations; Historical Biographies; Joyner-Kersee, Jackie
K-2

Friends Helping Friends to Prevent Bullying

Learners define bullying behavior and describe what bullying looks and feels like. In contrast, they experience the feelings of being helpful and kind to peers when they need it. Role-playing responses to bullying behavior leads to a discussion of ways to promote kind behaviors at school and decrease bullying behaviors. Learners take action for the common good to promote kindness in their school. They create posters to display around school with messages that promote kindness or teach people how to respond to bullying.

Focus Question: How does bullying behavior of individuals affect the whole community and how can people respond to stop bullying?

  1. Words Can Hurt

    ELA: Group Discussions; Literary Response; Reflection; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Friendship; Kindness; Sensitivity; Trust
    SOC: Bullying; Choices/Consequences; Communities
  2. Buckets of Kindness

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Chrysanthemum; Have you Filled a Bucket Today?; Brainstorming; Listening; Nonverbal Communication; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Courage; Friendship; Kindness; Responsibility; Trust
    SOC: Bullying; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; School Community
  3. Spreading the Kind Word

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Presentations; Role-Play
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Community; Compliments; Conflict Resolution; Needs Assessment; Reflection
    SOC: Bullying; Civic Responsibilit/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Good Character
K-2

Give It Back from a Snack

This unit will help students develop a better understanding of the basic nutritional needs and how those are vital for a person's health. This will give background information leading to the development of the service learning project to raise funds for an organization of their choice. Non profit organizations need funds from many sources to thrive. Students will work cooperatively to organize a fundraiser with the intent of a philanthropic outcome. They will survey the school population and analyze the results of those surveys to determine which snacks will be appropriate to sell as a fundraiser for their school. Students will determine where the proceeds will be donated.

  1. Kids' Kompany

    ELA: Literature; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Understanding/Interpretation; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Fundraising; Health; Self Interest; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Economics; Investment; Profit
  2. Invest with the Best

    ELA: Role-Play; Survey; Teamwork
    MAT: Classify; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Problem Solving; Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Commons; Cooperate; Health; Service Plan; Wants/Needs
    SCI: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Consumers; Production/Producer; Profit; Wants/Needs
  3. Cent Sense

    ELA: Questioning; Survey
    MAT: Attributes; Classify; Comparing Numbers; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: Budget; Health; Personal Wealth
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Banking System; Costs; Spending
  4. Appeal for the Meal

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Good Lemonade; Advertising/Marketing; Brainstorming; Listening; Literary Response; Personal Response; Writing Process
    MAT: Counting; Money
    PHIL: Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Health; Philanthropic Act; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Costs; Economics; Trade; Volunteerism; Voting
  5. Philanthropy Market Is Open Today (The)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Fact/Opinion; Letter Writing; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics
    MAT: Addition; Calculators; Counting; Mathematical Vocabulary; Money; Numbers; Predict; Problem Solving; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Health; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Food; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Common Good; Consumers; Cooperative Groups; Costs; Currency; For-Profit; Health and Disease; Labor; Marketplace; Profit; Salary; School Community
K-2

Giving from the Heart

Through performing a short play based on the book Quiltmaker’s Gift (See Bibliographic Reference) the students will understand the idea of using the Arts to do something for the common good.
  1. Giving from the Heart

    ELA: Audience; Fiction Literature; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Art from the Heart; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Giving; Helping; Philanthropist; Selflessness; Volunteer
    SOC: 2 lesson genOn
K-2

Global Education: Why Learn? (K-2)

Through discussion and a game, children identify the value of education to individuals and the community. Children hear a true story about a woman who performs a brave act for the common good. They identify the benefit the whole community shared and define philanthropy and common good. Children learn facts about learning around the globe. They brainstorm and carry out an act of service that promotes learning locally or globally.

Focus Question: What activities promote learning and the common good of a classroom community?

  1. Learning Opportunities around the World

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection
    PHIL: Commons; Community; Family; Global Community; School Climate
    SOC: Common Good; School Community
  2. Making a Difference Globally

    ELA: Literary Response; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Activism; Benefits; Perseverance; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Global Issues
  3. A Read-In

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Personal Response; Resources; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Charity; Common Good; Donate
    SOC: Global Issues; Nonprofit
K-2

Global Health: Hunger and Food Around the Globe (K-2)

Children learn about people in the world who are starving or experiencing food insecurity and how food is distributed. They discuss what it feels like to be hungry and read about the work of soup kitchens and other efforts to bring food to people who are hungry. They determine how they will help address hunger and starvation locally or globally, and reflect on these service opportunities.

  1. Favorite Foods

    ELA: Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Empathy; Family; Global Community; Hunger; Need; Neighborhood; Reflection; Sensitivity
    SOC: Communities; Economics; Health and Disease; Maps/Globes; Volunteerism
  2. A Billion Hungry People

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Personal Response
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Numbers
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Empathy; Global Community; Hunger; Need; Reflection
    SOC: Economics; Equality; Health and Disease; Justice; Simulation
  3. Helping People Who Are Hungry

    ELA: Fable; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Act of Kindness; Community; Donate; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Reflection; Service; Volunteer
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Decision-Making Model; Economics; Social Action
K-2

Go, Johnny, Go!

This unit introduces the learners to philanthropy, giving of time, talent, and/or treasure, through the example of Johnny Appleseed (John Chapman). By participating in a variety of lessons, the learners will develop a deeper understanding of how Environmental Stewardship and Philanthropy are related. Included in this study is a science component in which students learn about how the apple tree (and other trees) benefits the environment and people.

  1. Johnny Be Good

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reading
    PHIL: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: 8 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Environment; Good Character
  2. An Apple a Day

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree (The); Chronology; Non-Fiction Literature
    PHIL: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Cycles; Environment; Plants
  3. Dig Those Holes

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    ELA: Johnny Appleseed; Brainstorming; Letter Writing; Reflection
    PHIL: Common Good; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Self Interest; Selflessness; Service Project
    SCI: Environment; Plants
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Environment; Natural Resources
  4. Apple-icious

    ART-T: Theater: Perform
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Letter Writing; Reading; Role-Play
    MAT: Counting; Measurement
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Heat
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Common Good; Good Character
K-2

Good Will—Three Chinese Stories

In this unit, the students hear three beautiful stories of Chinese literature. Two are folk tales from ancient China, and the third is present day in North America. The learners explore decision-making and the consequences of choices made. The conclusion/moral is that selfless choices have their own rewards.
  1. Helping Others

    ELA: Seven Chinese Brothers (The); Cultural/Historical Contexts; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Serial Reciprocity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: China; Cultures; Discrimination; Tolerance
  2. Giving Generously

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Response to Text/Others; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    MAT: Fractions; Measurement
    PHIL: Cultures; Selflessness
    SOC: China; Human Characteristics of Place; Maps
  3. Seems Like a Million Bucks

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Nonprofit; Profit; Respect; Selflessness; Tolerance
    SOC: China; Chinese New Year; Communities; Wants/Needs
K-2

Grow Involved K-2

Students learn about caring and sharing through discussion of the book Martin's Big Words. The "big" word and concept of philanthropy (giving time, talent and treasure for the common good) is introduced. The students discuss ways they have been philanthropic by voluntarily being nice to someone or being helpful. The students learn about giving and sharing through listening to and responding to literature books. They show caring by doing a simple service project, and  they brainstorm and choose a group to receive their creations. This unit can be taught as grade specific using two lessons (Kindergarten - Lessons 1 & 2 , Grade 1 - Lessons 1 & 3, Grade 2 - Lessons 1 & 4). To extend the learning and service experiences, additional lesson can be used, as time allows.

  1. Big Words (Introduction Grade K-2)

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Leadership; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; Advocacy; Civil Rights; Good Character
  2. Giving Cheer (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Character Development; Letter Writing; Point of View; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Community; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
  3. Animals Matter (Grade 1)

    ELA: Fiction Literature; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Community; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Adaptation; Animals
    SOC: Common Good; Communities
  4. Home Away from Home (Grade 2)

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Point of View; Reading; Vocabulary
    MAT: Measurement; Numbers
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Communities
K-2

Growing as a Group

  • To introduce and instruct Kindergarten students about the skills necessary for interacting together as a group.
  • To teach Kindergarten students about responsible personal conduct.
  • To teach students that they are members of a community and to understand that all benefit when the community works together for the good of the group.
  1. Sharing is Caring

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; Decision Making Model; Goods and Services; Resources; Scarcity; School Community
  2. Compliments and Feelings

    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Compliments; School Climate
    SOC: 10 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Good Character; Point of View; Values
  3. Polite Listeners and Traffic Rules

    ELA: Listening; Poetry; Prior Knowledge; Reflection
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; School Climate; School Rules
    SOC: 10 genOn; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Rule of Law; Rules; Values
  4. Class Rules (Responsible Personal Conduct)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Common Good; School Climate; School Rules
    SOC: 10 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Consensus; Decision Making Model; Democratic Values; Personal Virtue; Rule of Law; Rules
  5. Hands are for Helping (Responsible Personal Conduct)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Prior Knowledge; Reflection
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Cooperate; School Climate
    SOC: 10 genOn; Communities; Good Character; Interdependence; Personal Virtue; Rules; Values
  6. Angry Feelings (Responsible Personal Conduct)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Conflict Resolution; Good Character; Rules
  7. Picture-Go-Round (Responsible Personal Conduct)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; School Climate
    SOC: 10 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Conflict Resolution; Cooperate; Interdependence; Personal Virtue
  8. Rolling in Dough (Responsible Personal Conduct)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; School Rules
    SOC: 10 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Conflict Resolution
  9. Service Project (Citizen Involvement)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Contribute; Need; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Brainstorming; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Goods and Services; Interdependence; Resources; Scarcity; Voting; Wants/Needs
K-2

Growing Our Future

The learners will understand the importance of giving their time, talent, and treasure to promote our natural resource of trees.  They will participate in a service learning project involving planting new trees and recycling waste paper to make mulch.  The learners will express their understanding and accomplishments in a variety of ways.

How can a learner use his/her time, talent, and treasure to renew our natural resource of trees?

Can a young person truly make a difference in our world?

  1. Speaking for the Trees

    ELA: Lorax (The); Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Listening; Main Idea; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Common Good; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Economics; Environment; Natural Resources
  2. A Potting We Will Go

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Tree is Nice (A); Listening; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Common Good; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Natural Resources; Nature; Plants
    SOC: Environment
  3. A Planting We Will Go

    ART: Music: Perform; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Listening; Poetry
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Common Good; Commons; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: Common Good; Maps
  4. A Shredding We Will Go

    ELA: Audience; Letter Writing; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Measurement
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Common Good; Commons; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling; Service Plan; Stewardship
    SCI: Ecology
K-2

Healthy Youth, Healthy Community (K-2)

The purpose of this unit is to introduce the learners to healthy living habits both for themselves as well as their community. They demonstrate their knowledge by participating in various activities making healthy food choices, exercising and helping people of the community do the same. Learners develop a service-learning project based on a community needs assessment. They reflect on their service project, demonstrate the impact on the community, and celebrate their hard work and success.
Focus Question: Why is it important to practice healthy living  habits and advocate for healthy living practices in a community?
  1. Healthy Classroom Community

    PHIL: Community; Cooperate; Trust
    SCI: Food; Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Healthy Community; Rules
  2. Building Blocks of Health

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Non-Fiction Literature; Reflection
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SCI: Food; Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  3. Healthy Balance

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate: Fiction Literature
    PHIL: Community
    SCI: Data Collection; Food; Health; Nutrition; Observation
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Healthy Community
  4. Media Messages and Healthy Choices

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act
    SCI: Food; Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community; Wants/Needs
  5. What Is My Responsibility?

    ELA: Brainstorming
    PHIL: Community; Helping; Needs; Philanthropic Act
    SCI: Food; Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
K-2

Helping Others to Feed Themselves

Students study the USDA food pyramid and understand the need to have a nutritiously balanced diet. They discover that all over the world there are people who are not able to provide this to their families. The class participates in the Heifer International’s Read-to-Feed Program. Children solicit pledges for each book they read. Through pledges from friends and family, readers earn money to purchase food-producing animals and training for hungry families who lack necessary resources.
  1. What Is the Food Pyramid?

    ELA: Literary Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Health
    SCI: Ecosystems; Nutrition
    SOC: 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Consumers; Cooperative Groups; Family; Opportunity Costs
  2. What Is a Balanced Menu?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Health
    SCI: Nutrition
    SOC: 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Consumers; Research
  3. World Hunger

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Listening; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Benefits; Caring/Sharing; Family; Giving; Health; Need; Philanthropic Literature; Philanthropic Organization
    SCI: Environment; Nature; Nutrition
    SOC: 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Communities; Consumers; Environment; Family; Opportunity Costs; Production/Producer; Resources; Scarcity
  4. Read to Feed

    ELA: Letter Writing; Reading
    MAT: Counting; Money
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Act of Kindness; Benefits; Fundraising; Health; Hunger; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Stewardship
    SCI: Animals; Nature
    SOC: 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Communities; Currency; Decision Making Model; Diversity; Environment; Family; Natural Resources; Opportunity Cost; Scarcity
K-2

How About a Hand?

Good literature can do a powerful job of helping young children learn the conventions and appropriate behavior in the community, school, and home. Through eight stories, children will learn to help each other, value others, believe in themselves, treat smaller children with patience, work together, get along, recognize a need and seek a solution, realize that people are more similar than different, and understand that everyone is deserving of respect, without regard to race or physical/mental challenges.

  1. Who Will Help?

    ELA: Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Good Character; Goods and Services; Wants/Needs
  2. Valuing Others

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Noisy Nora; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Calculators; Counting; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Family; Time/Talent/Treasure; Trust
    SOC: 10 genOn
  3. Yes, You Can!

    ART: Theater: Perform
    ELA: Amazing Grace; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Estimation
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Family; Minorities; Time/Talent/Treasure
  4. How Should You Treat Younger Children?

    ELA: Julius, Baby of the World; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Estimation
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Family; Sensitivity; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good; Rules
  5. Working Together To Solve a Problem

    ELA: Selavi, That is Life: A Haitian Story of Hope; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Cooperate; Homelessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 6 genOn; Communities
  6. Making the World a More Beautiful Place

    ELA: Miss Rumphius; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Estimation; Measurement
    PHIL: Community
  7. Welcome to the Class

    ART: Theater: Perform
    ELA: Brand New Kid (The); Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Cooperate
    SOC: Conflict Resolution; Core Democratic Values; Rules
  8. Recognizing How We Are Alike

    ELA: Sneetches (The); Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Attributes; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Pluralism; Respect
    SOC: Human Characteristics of Place
K-2

How About a Hand? (1st Grade)

Students will listen and respond to a story about a young girl who creates a special “rose garden.” Her boundless energy, giving spirit and continued optimism are infectious and help to unite her neighborhood in the spirit of giving and cooperation.

  1. How About a Hand? (1st Grade)

    ELA: Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Cooperate; Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities
K-2

How the Cookie Crumbles

This unit is designed to encourage learners to trust members in the classroom setting. They will share in hands on activities that they can use in many different areas throughout the school facility.
  1. Trust

    PHIL: Conflict Resolution; Trust
    SOC: 8 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Reflection
  2. Trust Banner

    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure; Trust
    SOC: Good Character
  3. Cookie Share (The)

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; School Climate; Trust
    SOC: 10 genOn; Community
K-2

I'm in a Tizzy! How Can I Help? (Kindergarten)

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce children to literature that reinforces the concept of unconditional kindness and demonstrates the idea that a good deed deserves another. Students will begin to understand that one act of kindness can lead to other acts of kindness and that acts of kindness are acts of philanthropy, giving of one's time, talent and/or treasures for the good of others.

  1. I'm in a Tizzy! How Can I Help? (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Questioning; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Understanding; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Act of Kindness; Compliments; Family; Justice; Kindness; Neighborhood; Serial Reciprocity; Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Communities; Justice; Volunteerism
K-2

Investing In Others (K-2)

Students gain awareness of and empathy for differences between their wants and needs and the wants and needs of others. They discuss the read-aloud book Sam and the Lucky Money and build understanding of the choices we make with our assets, like time and talent. They explore ways they can share their time, talent, and treasure with someone with different needs and wants than their own.

Focus Question: How do our needs and wants impact our choices?

  1. What Would You Do With Twenty Dollars?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Personal Response; Viewpoing
    MAT: Money
    PHIL: Empathy; Global Community; Reflection; Respect
    SOC: Cultures; Currency; Global Issues
  2. Define Wants and Needs

    ELA: Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Donate; Global Community; Need
    SOC: Economics; Financial Resources; Global Issues; Spending
  3. What Do I Have to Give?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Donate; Need; Philanthropic Act; Reflection
K-2

Johnny Be Good (1st Grade)

Students will define philanthropy and identify ways in which Johnny Appleseed acted as a philanthropist through environmental stewardship. After identifying ways in which they personally act as philanthropists, they will raise awareness of philanthropy in the school and home.

  1. Johnny Be Good (1st Grade)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reading
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities; Compare/Contrast; Environment; Good Character
K-2

Kwanzaa: Unity Within Community

Through the integration of the arts, the learners will develop an understanding of the seven principles of Kwanzaa. Students are challenged to apply the principles to their everyday lives in a way that enhances the communities to which they belong.
  1. What Is Kwanzaa?

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Main Idea; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: African American; Common Good; Community; Need
    SOC: 1 genOn; 12 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Cultural Regions; Human Characteristics of Place
  2. Habari Gani (What Is the News?)

    ART: Dance; Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Nonverbal Communication; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: African American; Common Good; Community
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Good Character
  3. Habari Gani: The Last Four Principles

    ART: Dance; Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Nonverbal Communication; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: African American; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Family; Opportunity Costs; Selflessness
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Good Character
K-2

Let's Make Lemonade

Students will understand the basic definition of philanthropy as the giving of time, talent and treasure for the common good. Students will also understand that everyone, regardless of age, can be a philanthropist. Students will understand that examples of philanthropy can be found in many areas.

The essential questions:

What is philanthropy?

Why do we have philanthropists?

Is every act done for another philanthropic?

  1. What is a Philanthropist?

    ELA: Character Development; Reflection; Retelling
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Philanthropist
    SOC: 8 genOn; Communities; Ethics; Natural Characteristics of Place
  2. Philanthropy in Song

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    ELA: Reading
    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement
  3. What's the Big Idea?

    ELA: If God Gives You Lemons; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Patterns
    PHIL: Community; Need; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities; Wants/Needs
  4. Who's Going to Help?

    ELA: Little Red Hen (The); Listening; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Speaking
    MAT: Numbers
    PHIL: Donate; Giving
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Goods and Services; Wants/Needs
  5. Get Ready, Get Set, Squeeze!

    ELA: Coin Counting Book (The); Expository Text
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Service
    SOC: Need
  6. Purchasing Power

    ELA: Journaling; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Community; Need; Reflection
    SOC: Need
K-2

Let's Play and Learn

Learners explore the important role that rules play at home and school, as well as in the games they play. With a deck of playing cards, the learners play simple games that practice math concepts and cooperative play. This unit serves as a precursor to the more complicated game of Mini Bridge.
Focus Question:
How do rules help us?

  1. Rules of the Game

    ELA: Listening; Non-Fiction Literature; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; Family; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; School Rules
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  2. Let's Play

    ELA: Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Patterns; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Time
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Rules
  3. Let's Play Another Game

    ELA: Listening; Vocabulary
    MAT: Attributes; Counting; Patterns; Similarity; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Rules
  4. Let's Play One More Time

    ELA: Listening; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Numeral Patterns; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Location; Rules
  5. Playing Tricks, Trump, and Whist

    ELA: Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Similarity; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
K-2

Linked Together (2nd Grade)

United States citizens not only have individual rights as citizens but also responsibilities. It is important for children to learn how local governments balance these individual rights with the common good to solve local community problems. With these skills, students will be able to get along better in their classroom, neighborhood and community if they do their duty as good citizens.

  1. Linked Together (2nd Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Community; Rules
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Communities; Freedom; Laws; Political Freedom
K-2

Living In a Community

Students explore the concept of community and perform a service in order to recognize their responsibility to their community.
  1. What Is a Community?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Non-Fiction Literature; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Helping; Neighborhood
    SOC: 8 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; School Community
  2. Our Classroom Is a Community

    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Expository Writing
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Helping; Philanthropic Act; School Climate; Time/Talent/Treasure; Trust
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Family; School Community
  3. Exporing Our Community

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: City Mouse & Country Mouse; Brainstorming; Fiction Literature; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Community; Cooperate; Neighborhood
    SOC: Communities; Cooperative Groups; Human Characteristics of Place
  4. Profit and Nonprofit Organizations

    ELA: Journaling; Predicting; Understanding/Interpretation; Viewing
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Economics; Natural Characteristics of Place
  5. Providing Service for a Nonprofit

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Letter Writing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Cooperate; Philanthropic Act; Sensitivity; Service Plan; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Communities; Cooperative Groups; Nonprofit Organizations; Wants/Needs
K-2

Living in a Community: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (1st)

Students will understand the basic definition of philanthropy as the giving of time, talent and treasure for the common good. Students will also understand that everyone, regardless of age, can be a philanthropist. Students will understand that examples of philanthropy can be found in many areas.

The essential questions:

  • What is philanthropy?
  • Why do we have philanthropists?
  • Is every act done for another philanthropic?

  1. What Is a Philanthropist?: Philanthropy Lesson (1st)

    ELA: Character Development; Reflection; Retelling
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Giving; Philanthropist
    SOC: Communities; Ethics; Natural Characteristics of Place
  2. Philanthropy in Song: Philanthropy Lesson (1st)

    ART: Music
    ELA: Take Me Out of the Bathtub; Reading
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement
  3. Our Classroom is a Community: Philanthropy Lesson (1st)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Expository Writing
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Giving; Helping; Philanthropic Act; School Climate; Time/Talent/Treasure; Trust
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Family
K-2

Making the World a More Beautiful Place (Kindergarten)

Students will be exposed to literature that illustrates how responsible citizens participate constructively in their maintaining and enhancing the environment.

  1. Making the World a More Beautiful Place (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Caring/Sharing; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; Responsibility
    SOC: 2 lesson genOn
K-2

Many Hands Together Make a Lighter Load
(2nd Grade)

Many students are unsure what the term homeless means or how to help those that are homeless. This lesson will help then get a better understanding of the concept through the story Selavi, That is Life: A Haitian Story of Hope. The story tells about a group of homeless children who work together to help themselves and then help other children. This lesson will also help develop the students' cooperative learning skills.

  1. Many Hands Together Make a Lighter Load (2nd Grade)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: 6 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue
K-2

Money Smart Children (2nd grade)

In this unit, the students learn the meaning of the words spend, save, invest, and donate. They collect money to donate and use an economic decision-making model to choose the recipient. Students begin to understand the importance of budgeting and create a personal budget. Younger students practice their skills in identifying and counting coins, while older students gain experience with data tables and bar graphs.
  1. Spend, Save, Invest, or Donate (2nd grade)

    ELA: Sam and the Lucky Money; Listening; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Decimals; Percent; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Personal Giving Plan; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Benefits; Common Good; Consumers; Costs; Economics; Investment; Natural Resources; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Scarcity; Spending; Taxation; Wants/Needs
  2. Thinking About Money (2nd grade)

    ELA: Alexander Who Used To Be Rich Last Sunday; Chair For My Mother (A); Fiction Literature; Personal Response; Point of View; Response to Text/Others; Retelling
    PHIL: Charity; Common Good; Donate; Fundraising
    SOC: Budget; Consumers; Economics; Family; Goods and Services; Incentives; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity; Spending; Taxation; Wants/Needs
  3. Making Good Money Choices (2nd grade)

    ELA: Questioning; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Donate; Fundraising; Need; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs; Resources
  4. Count On It! (2nd grade)

    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Money; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Cooperate; Fundraising; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Currency; Goods and Services
  5. My Bank, My Budget, My Decisions! (2nd grade)

    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Personal Giving Plan; Personal Wealth; Service Project
    SOC: Budget; Economics; Income; Investment; Resources; Spending
K-2

Our Class, Our Earth (Kindergarten)

  1. Our Class, Our Earth (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Main Idea; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; Recycling; Responsibility
    SCI: Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Common Good
K-2

Our Land

In this unit Woody’s legacy continues to inspire and educate about the need for “commons” in our communities. The Woody Guthrie song This Land is Your Land is used to communicate the concepts of philanthropy, private property and “commons.” These concepts will be defined and described. The illustrations in This Land Is Your Land will enable the learner to distinguish “commons” areas. “Commons” areas in the school will also be identified. The need for “commons,” and the responsibility to care for “commons”will become clear.

  1. Your Land, My Land, Woody's Land, Too

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Nonprofit Sector; Volunteer
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Ecosystems; Environment; Group Discussions; Historical Biographies; Land Use; Maps/Globes; Natural Characteristics of Place; Prior Knowledge; Recession; Timelines; Wants/Needs
  2. Song Mapping

    ELA: This Land Is Your Land; Author's Style/Purpose
    PHIL: Nonprofit Sector; Volunteer
    SOC: Community; Inquiry; Maps/Globes; Natural Characteristics of Place; Recession; Wants/Needs
  3. What's Public? What's Private?

    ELA: This Land Is Your Land; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Research
    PHIL: Commons; Volunteer
    SOC: Adaptation; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Conservation; Human Characteristics of Place; Inquiry; Observation
  4. We Care For Our Commons

    ELA: This Land Is Your Land; Compare/Contrast; Guthrie, Woody; Reflection
    PHIL: Commons; Community; Need; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Human Capital; Human Characteristics of Place
  5. Lets Celebrate Our Land!

    ELA: This Land Is Your Land; Brainstorming; Guthrie, Woody; Presentations; Speaking; Teamwork; Writing
    PHIL: Commons; Community; Volunteer
    SOC: Historical Biographies; Human Characteristics of Place; Inquiry; Maps; Timelines
K-2

Our Land: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (2nd)

In this unit Woody’s legacy continues to inspire and educate about the need for “commons” in our communities. The Woody Guthrie song This Land is Your Land is used to communicate the concepts of philanthropy, private property and “commons.” These concepts will be defined and described. The illustrations in This Land Is Your Land will enable the learner to distinguish “commons” areas. “Commons” areas in the school will also be identified. The need for “commons,” and the responsibility to care for “commons”will become clear.

  1. Your Land, My Land, Woody's Land, Too: Philanthropy Lesson (2nd)

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Volunteer
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Ecosystems; Environment; Group Discussions; Historical Biographies; Land Use; Maps/Globes; Natural Characteristics of Place; Nonprofit; Prior Knowledge; Recession; Timelines; Wants/Needs
  2. Song Mapping: Philanthropy Lesson (2nd)

    ELA: This Land Is Your Land; Author’s Style/Purpose
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Nonprofit Sector; Volunteer
    SOC: Community; Inquiry; Maps/Globes; Natural Characteristics of Place; Recession; Wants/Needs
  3. What's Public? What's Private?: Philanthropy Lesson (2nd)

    ELA: This Land Is Your Land; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Research
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Commons; Volunteer
    SOC: Adaptation; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Conservation; Human Characteristics of Place; Inquiry; Observation; Responsibility
K-2

Our Playful Community

This unit is designed to encourage learners to trust their families, classmates, and neighbors. The classroom setting provides a safe environment for experimentation with trusting others. Enjoy the variety of intelligences that are displayed in the unit.
  1. Our Classroom—The Community of Fun

    PHIL: Commons; Community; Trust
    SOC: 10 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Reflection; Resources; Rules
  2. Our Family

    PHIL: Family
    SOC: 10 genOn; Brainstorming; Common Good; Community; Conflict Resolution; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model
  3. Our Neighborhood as a Community

    PHIL: Commons; Trust
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good; Community; Human Characteristics of Place; Need; Volunteerism
K-2

People Making a Difference

Students realize the importance of meeting the needs of food, water, shelter, clothing, healthcare and school. Students learn about events that prevent people from getting their basic needs met, such as a natural disaster or moving to a new community. They also explore how people and organizations step forward to help others get their basic needs met. Students become sensitive to the needs of others and are motivated to think about ways they can help.

  1. Meeting Our Daily Needs

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Journaling; Personal Response; Presentations; Prior Knowledge; Speaking; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Common Good; Giving; Need; Philanthropic Act; Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Cooperative Groups; Wants/Needs
  2. Our Area's History of Philanthropy

    ELA: Communicate; Graphic Organizer; Letter Writing; Reading; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: Charity; Civil Society; Common Good; Community; Motivation for Giving; Personal Wealth; Philanthropic Traditions; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities; Historical Biographies; Past/Present/Future; Research
  3. Community Heritage

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Letter Writing; Plot Development; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Hispanics; Need; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Cultures; Immigration; SOC: Communities; Wants/Needs
K-2

People Making a Difference (Kindergarten)

This lesson introduces the concept of basic needs. Students will distinguish between needs and wants. They will become aware that some people lack the resources to have their basic needs met.

  1. People Making a Difference (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Presentations; Prior Knowledge; Speaking; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Giving; Need
    SOC: Communities; Wants/Needs
K-2

People Who Work

Students will become aware of the not-for-profit and volunteer positions that are essential parts of any community.
  1. Responsibility and Jobs

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Career Opportunities; Community; Helping
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Community Helpers

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Non-Fiction Literature; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Career Opportunities; Community; Helping
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Communities; Economics; For-Profit; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  3. Volunteers in the Community

    ELA: Brainstorming; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Common Good; Community; Helping; Needs Assessment; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Rights/Responsibilities; Wants/Needs
K-2

Pet Care and Safety

It’s important for learners of all ages to understand that animals are living, feeling beings.  This unit encourages children to think about pets and what they bring to the lives of human beings. They will understand that by providing animals with basic needs and treating animals with kindness and respect, they are demonstrating responsible pet care, Environmental Stewardship and acting as responsible citizens of the community.

 

Focus Question: 
What is each person’s responsibility for animal welfare?

  1. What Is a Pet?

    ELA: List; Questioning
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Oh the Pets You Can Get; 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship
    SOC: Family
  2. Pets Have Needs Too

    ELA: Buddy Unchained; Graphic Organizer; Personal Response; Reading; Tails are Not for Pulling; Understanding; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Environmental Stewardship; Kindness
    SOC: Environment; Wants/Needs
  3. Meeting the Needs of Pets

    ELA: Before You Were Mine; Let's Get a Pet, Said Kate; Advertising/Marketing; Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Listening
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Act of Kindness; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Charity; Donate; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; Needs Assessment; Responsibility
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue
K-2

Phil Up on the Arts

This unit will introduce the meaning of philanthropy and community and show how the students can practice philanthropy in the school and neighborhood in which they live. They will learn about these concepts through music, movement, and creative dramatics experiences. The students will then create a philanthropic product that will be given to an organization or group that works with children.
  1. Alphabody ABCs of Giving

    ELA: Brainstorming; Role-Play; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Giving; Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure; Values; Volunteer
  2. What Can I Do for You?

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Service Learning; Volunteerism
    SOC: Brainstorming; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Reflection; Service Learning; Values
  3. Swimmy

    ART: Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Swimmy; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Plot Development; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Need; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
  4. Singing as a Way of Giving

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    ELA: Speaking; Technology
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; Donate; Giving; Service Project; Volunteer; Wants/Needs
K-2

Philanthropic Behavior

Students will learn appropriate behavior in a group setting and will perform philanthropic acts of kindness, which contribute to the common good.
  1. Rules

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Courtesy; Honesty; Respect; School Climate; School Rules
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Consensus; Good Character; Government; Rules
  2. Cooperative Building

    PHIL: Benefits; Cooperate; Respect
    SOC: Benefits; Consensus; Cooperate; Good Character; Inquiry
  3. Class Soup

    ELA: Stone Soup; Listening; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; Volunteer
    SCI: Classify; Plants
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Goods and Services; Resources
  4. Hug O' War

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Cooperate; Problem Solving
    SOC: Conflict Resolution; Core Democratic Values; Public Policy
  5. Nature Tribute

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Recycling; Service Project
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Ecology; Environment; Natural Characteristics of Place; Nature
  6. Kindness Certificate

    ELA: Brainstorming; Critical Thinking; Listening; Reflection
    PHIL: Kindness; Personal Wealth; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Good Character; Reflection
  7. Picture Sharing

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; Trust
K-2

Philanthropic Literature

By exploring the concepts and vocabulary of philanthropy, the students will be able to better understand what it means to help each other and be altruistic.

  1. Lonely Fish (The)

    ELA: Rainbow Fish (The); Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Conflict Resolution; Rules
  2. Lion and the Mouse (The)

    ELA: Lion and the Mouse (The); Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fable; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Helping
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Good Character
  3. Give a Cookie

    ELA: Doorbell Rang (The); Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fable; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Measurement; Predict
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Goods and Services; Scarcity
  4. Chinese Proverb on Honesty

    ELA: Empty Pot (The); Character Development; China; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Folktales; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Honesty
    SCI: Plants
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Cultures
  5. Colors and Trouble

    ELA: Land of Many Colors; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Justice; Liberty
  6. Quilt to Freedom

    ELA: Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: African American; Respect; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; Human Characteristics of Place; Liberty; Quilts; Slavery; Underground Railroad
  7. Kindness Just Because

    ELA: Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Folktales; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Kindness; Selflessness
    SOC: Africa; Natural Characteristics of Place
  8. Friendly Neighbors

    ELA: Miss Tizzy; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Neighborhood; Time/Talent/Treasure
  9. Everyone Is Special

    ELA: Very Special Critter (A); Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Plot Development; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Diversity; Philanthropic Act; Tolerance
  10. George Washington Carver and Sharing

    ELA: Weed is a Flower (A); Biography; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: African American; Common Good
    SCI: Carver, George Washington
    SOC: 2 genOn; Historical Biographies
K-2

Philanthropy in Bloom

This unit centers on the basic needs and purposes of plants, as well as people. The students will understand that although the arts are not needs, they add purpose and joy to life. Children will be exposed to movement, music and visual arts activities. Students will realize that sharing flowers can be an act of philanthropy. They will use a problem-solving model to collaboratively choose an appropriate site for planting flowers. Through reflection, students recognize the benefits of service learning to the giver as well as to the recipient.
  1. Moving with the Marigolds

    ELA: Prior Knowledge; Reading; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Need; Trust; Volunteer
    SCI: Environment; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Wants/Needs
  2. Friendly Flowers

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Speaking
    PHIL: Commons; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Need; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Observation; Plants; Senses
    SOC: 4 genOn
  3. Flowering Philanthropy

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Informational Genre; Listening; Main Idea; Reflection; Speaking; Writing Process
    PHIL: Benefits; Common Good; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Values; Volunteer
    SCI: Environment; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Wants/Needs
K-2

Philanthropy is "Phun"

To begin building a philanthropic foundation in students that encourages them to become active participants in society.
  1. ABCs of Giving (The)

    ELA: Reflection
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
  2. Reach into the 'Caring Container'

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Reflection
  3. Learning the Lingo

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: Volunteer
    SOC: Community; Good Character
  4. Creating a Personal Philanthropy Timeline

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Chronology; Common Good; Timelines
K-2

Phil's Garden of Good

The purpose of the unit is to introduce the learners to science and philanthropy through the care and sharing of flowers.

  1. Planting Phil's Garden

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Listening; Literary Response; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Commons; Community; Family; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Garden; Life Science; Plants
    SOC: 2 genOn; Common Good; Community Capital; Environment; Family; Natural Resources; Timelines
  2. Planting the Seeds of Knowledge

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Journaling; Listening; Prior Knowledge; Writing
    PHIL: Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Environment; Garden; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Life Cycles; Measure; Observation
    SOC: 2 genOn; Communities; Volunteerism
  3. Rubbing Elbows with Plants

    ELA: Brainstorming; Letter Writing; Listening; Poetry; Vocabulary; Voice; Writing Process
    PHIL: Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Environment; Garden; Natural Resources; Plants
    SOC: 2 genOn; Career Opportunities; Communities; Volunteerism
  4. Special Delivery—Handle with Care

    ELA: Audience; Creative Writing; Letter Writing; Listening; Literary Response; Speaking; Writing Process
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Community; Contribute; Friendship; Giving; Kindness; Respect; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 2 genOn; Common Good; Family; Good Character; Rules
K-2

Pilgrim's Progress

The purpose of this unit is to role-play experiences that will give children a better understanding of the lives of the early pilgrims in their travels from Europe to America in search of religious freedom. They will recognize the importance of acting for the common good.

  1. Get on the Boat

    ELA: Journaling; Point of View
    PHIL: Human Rights; Religious Perspectives
    SOC: 11 genOn; Freedom; History to 1620; Mobility; Persecution
  2. Searching for a New Home

    ELA: If You Sailed on the Mayflower ; Expository Text; Journaling; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Common Good; Respect
    SOC: 11 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Cultures; Historical Biographies
  3. Sad Seasick Sailors

    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Journaling; Non-Fiction Literature; Point of View
    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate; Respect
    SOC: 11 genOn; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; History to 1620
  4. Arrival (The)

    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Journaling; Non-Fiction Literature; Point of View
    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate; Respect; Rules
    SOC: 11 genOn; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; History to 1620
  5. Native American Philanthropists

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Squanto’s Journey; Non-Fiction Literature; Poetry; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Native Americans; Sharing; Social Capital
    SOC: 11 genOn; Common Good; History to 1620; Native Peoples
K-2

Poetry for the Common Good

Students will understand that you find poetry everywhere: lyrics to songs, commercials and rap. They will also realize that philanthropic themes are often found in poetry. Students will write poems with philanthropic themes.

  1. Poetry for the Common Good

    ELA: Universal Themes
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
K-2

Protect Your Melon

The community of learners, parents, guardians and extended family become partners in voluntary action for the common good. As learners develop the four themes of philanthropy, culminating in two effective service activities, they will meet identified benchmarks and standards in all content areas. Learners will learn about the need for bicycle safety through understanding, relating and demonstrating the five basic rules of bicycle safety to others in the community. Learners will become aware of the basic vocabulary associated with philanthropy as they prepare for their service activity. Learners will demonstrate using their time, talent and treasure to provide for the common good through fund-raising activities and construction of a bicycle safety course.
  1. Bike Safety

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Inquiry; Journaling; Listening; Media Genres; Observation; Reading; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others; Viewing; Vocabulary
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Courage; Fundraising; Honesty; Need
    SOC: Adaptation; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Inquiry; Laws; Rules
  2. Funds for Fun and Safety

    ELA: Benny Goes into Business; Brainstorming; Letter Writing; Listening; Reflection
    MAT: Counting; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: 10 genOn; Fundraising; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Budget; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Community; Inquiry; Research; Survey
  3. Use Your Melon

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Writing Process
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Shapes
    PHIL: Reflection; Service Project
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Inquiry; Research; Survey
K-2

Quarters From Kids (K-5)

  1. Quarters From Kids - You Can Count on Me! (K-5)

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    ELA: Sam and the Lucky Money; Listening; Literature; Money; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Counting; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Donate; Giving; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Disaster: Natural; Global Issues; Maps
K-2

Reading for Pennies: Penny Drive

This lesson will help students understand why people donate money to organizations and why organizations need money to help others. Learners will solicit funds (pledges) from family member in exchange for a certain number of minutes reading.

  1. Reading for Pennies: Penny Drive

    ELA: Listening; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Money
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Common Good; Contribute; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
K-2

Recognizing Our Similarities and Difference
(Kindergarten)

Students will listen to a story that illustrates that although we have differences, we are also very similar. They will begin to understand the definitions of diversity and realize that focusing on the differences alone may cause conflict.

  1. Recognizing Our Similarities and Differences
    (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Predicting; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    MAT: Attributes; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Justice; Minorities; Respect
    SOC: Diversity; Human Characteristics of Place
K-2

Refugees: Finding a Place (K-2)

 

Students view a video about a girl named Carly who is forced to leave her home. They define the term refugee and discuss the problems Carly faces in her travels to find a safe place to live. The students examine the reasons refugees must leave their homes. The students analyze a poster and describe what the characters might be feeling and thinking. They respond to the true story of a refugee girl in the book The Whispering Cloth. The students learn to distinguish the difference between wants and needs and categorize items into wants or needs.  Students learn that many times refugees are without resources to meet basic needs. The book, Four Feet, Two Sandals, illustrates some of the concerns and issues in a refugee camp. Students come to consensus and plan and implement a student-driven service project to benefit refugees or other children in need. As a reflection, students create a "story quilt" about their service project.

Focus Question(s): How do people become refugees? How does the plight of refugees affect us? What is our responsibility to address the needs of refugees?

  1. Carly

    ELA: Vocabulary
    SOC: Refugees, 6 genOn
  2. Feeling Alone

    ELA: Cultural/Histroical Contexts; Inferences/Generalizations; Nonverbal Communication; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Philanthropist
    SOC: 6 genOn; Disaster: Human-Made; Refugees
  3. Helping Children in Need

    ELA: Compare/Contrast
    PHIL: Reflection; Service
    SOC: 6 genOn; Refugees; Wants/Needs
K-2

Remember...Reflection

This unit will use the reflection process to increase the learners' understanding of feelings, past experiences and consequences of actions. They will understand what makes a good interview and story, and conduct an interview of a family member. Students will use reflection as a learning tool.
  1. Tell Me A Story—Feelings

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Listening; Poetry; Prior Knowledge; Reading; Reflection; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Values
  2. Tell Me A Story—Consequences

    ELA: Uncle Jed's Barbershop; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Perception; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Values
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Good Character; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity
  3. Interview For Reflection

    ELA: Brainstorming; Inquiry; Interview; Research; Writing Process
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character
K-2

Repairing the World (Private-Religious)

Students become actively engaged in the process of improving the world through acts of kindness. They learn to recognize those who are helping others as role models and emulate their actions by being helpful and kind to their classmates, families, and community members.

Throughout the unit, they continuously ask themselves:

What actions are helpful and kind and thereby make this world a better place?

How can I fulfill my responsibility to partake in these activities?

  1. The Whole World in Our Hands (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Judaism; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Parochial
  2. Love Your Neighbors Like Yourself (Private-Religious)

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Role-Play
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Friendship; Judaism
    SOC: Parochial
  3. Power of Speech (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Yettele’s Feathers; Listening; Parable; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Compliments; Friendship; Judaism
    SOC: Parochial
K-2

Rules for the Common Good

Students will work together to develop a set of classroom rules and an understanding of how rules can meet the needs of the common good.
  1. Teacher Is Missing (The)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Listening; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: School Rules
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Rule of Law; Rules
  2. Less Is Best

    ELA: Reflection; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: School Rules
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Consensus; Rules; School Climate
  3. Posting Our Rules

    PHIL: School Climate; School Rules
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Rules; School Rules
K-2

Saving the Monarch

The purpose of this unit is to introduce the learners to the concept of Environmental Stewardship, community and how making an area attractive is an act of philanthropy.  This will be achieved through looking at the Monarch Butterfly and the four stages of its life cycle. Learners will also discover that the Monarch is dependent on the milkweed plant as a source of energy.


Focus Question: How is caring for the environment, by protecting plants and animals, related to civic responsibility?

 

  1. Life Cycle

    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Energy; Food; Monarch Butterfly
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities
  2. Review of Life Cycle

    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Life Cycles
    SOC: Common Good; Environment
  3. Planting a Monarch Butterfly Garden

    PHIL: Miss Rumphius; Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Energy; Food; Habitat
    SOC: Environment; Resources
K-2

Selfless Sam (2nd Grade)

This lesson introduces the students to concepts about homelessness, hunger and philanthropy. The students will listen to a story about a Chinese boy who chooses to give his precious four dollars (“lucky money”) to a homeless man, setting the tone for initial discussions about selflessness, and ways to address hunger, and poverty.

  1. Selfless Sam (2nd)

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Listening; Perception; Response to Text/Others; Speaking
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Giving; Homelessness; Hunger; Need; Philanthropic Act; Selflessness
    SOC: Community; Human Characteristics of Place; Opportunity Costs; Resources
K-2

Selflessness

This unit will teach the basic philanthropic concept of selflessness. The students will be encouraged to consider the effects of their actions on others. The ultimate goal will be for students to understand that as responsible citizens they can resolve social problems by constructively participating in their communities. Private or individual action for public good is a Core Democratic Value.
  1. Selfless - Selfish

    PHIL: Selflessness; Volunteer
    SOC: Legend of the Bluebonnet (The); Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Conflict Resolution; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Native Peoples; Values
  2. Life Shields

    ELA: Legend of the Bluebonnet (The)
    PHIL: Common Good; Community
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Native Peoples; Values
  3. What's in a Name?

    PHIL: Reflection
    SOC: Legend of the Bluebonnet (The); Community; Good Character; Native Peoples; Values
K-2

Sense of Community (A)

The goal of the unit is for students to recognize that they are part of different communities and that there are many types of communities in the world. The students use their senses to make more careful observations around their community. They gain sensitivity to the differences among people and among living situations around the world. The class chooses a service project related to homelessness

How do we use our senses to recognize similarities and differences between communities and people?

  1. Houses and Communities

    ELA: Houses and Homes; Response to Text/Others; Someplace to Go; Writing
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Community; Sensitivity; Service Plan; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Communities; Maps
  2. Using Senses in My Community

    ELA: Concept Mapping; Graphic Organizer; Narrative Writing; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Common Good; Sensitivity
    SCI: Data Collection/Organization; Environment
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Common Good; Community; Environment
  3. Eating Together as Good Citizens

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Tolerance
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Communities
K-2

Sharing and Caring Across Generations

This K-2 unit works toward creating connections, sensitivity and friendship between people of different generations. Lessons are based on literature, math, science and social studies. Students listen to stories about different generations and make connections with some senior community members. Students explore everyone’s shared experiences with memory—memories of people, toys, good times, family. They also explore everyone’s responsibility for stewardship of the environment through reuse and recycling: in the past, the present and the future.In this unit, the students explore the shared experiences of people of many different generations and of the future. They will explore the concept of recycling, what it meant in past generations compared to what it means today.

  1. Traveling Back in Time

    ELA: Brainstorming; Literature; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 genOn; 5 genOn; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Community; Historical Biographies
  2. Graphing Memories

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Questioning
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Interpret; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: 1 genOn
  3. Making Something from Nothing

    ELA: Just a Dream; Something From Nothing; Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Common Good; Listening; Recycling; Respect; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation
    SOC: Past/Present/Future; Scarcity
  4. Trash: Past, Present and Future

    ELA: Dinosaurs to the Rescue!; Where Does the Garbage Go?; Compare/Contrast; Interview; Non-Fiction Literature; Research; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Common Good; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Listening; Recycling; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment
    SOC: Environment; Inquiry; Past/Present/Future
  5. Intergenerational Friendships

    ELA: Communicate; Interview; Journaling; Listening; Literary Response; Speaking; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Reflection; Respect; Sensitivity; Service Project
    SOC: Communities; Diversity; Good Character; Past/Present/Future
K-2

Sharing Compliments (1st Grade)

  1. Sharing Compliments (1st Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Non-Fiction Literature; Questioning; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Understanding; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Communities; Compliments; Giving; Justice; Reflection; Respect; Serial Reciprocity
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Good Character
K-2

Sharing our Talents

Students will see an example of giving one’s talents (philanthropy) in Native American culture using children’s literature. They will analyze their own special gifts or talents and determine how the community can gain from them.

  1. Sharing our Talents

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Community; Cultures; Native Peoples
K-2

Sharing the Gift of Literacy

By exploring the concepts and vocabulary of philanthropy, the students will be able to better understand what it means to help each other and be altruistic.

Focus Question: What can young people do to make the community a better place for all?

  1. Community Sharing

    ELA: Rainbow Fish (The); Read n' Give; Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements
    PHIL: 2 genOn; 3 genOn; Book Drive; Caring/Sharing; Common Good
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Rules
  2. Giving Back Like a Mouse

    ELA: Lion and the Mouse (The); Read n' Give; Compare/Contrast; Fable; Fiction Literature; Inferences/Generalizations; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Book Drive; Helping
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Good Character
  3. Tolerance and Sharing

    ELA: Land of Many Colors; Read n' Give; Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Book Drive; Respect; Tolerance
  4. Read and Share Books

    ELA: Read n' Give; Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Book Drive; Community; Donate; Need; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Communities; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  5. George Washington Carver and Sharing Our Books

    ELA: Read n' Give; Weed is a Flower (A); Biography; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: African American; Book Drive; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Contribute; Donate; Reflection
    SCI: Carver, George Washington
    SOC: 2 genOn; Civil Society; Communities; Historical Biographies
K-2

Sharing with Others (Private-Religious)

This unit demonstrates to students the importance of being aware of the needs and opinions of others. It encourages students to think beyond themselves and to treat others with tolerance and respect.

This unit enables students to reflect on the following questions:

  • What does it mean to cooperate?
  • What does it mean to share?
  • What does it mean to be tolerant of others?
  1. Sharing What is Ours (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Speaking; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Judaism; Sharing
    SOC: Parochial
  2. Sharing the Work (Private-Religious)

    ART-M: Music: History/Culture
    ELA: Little Red Hen (The); Response to Text/Others; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Cooperate; Helping; Judaism; Sharing
    SOC: Parochial
  3. Sharing our Differences (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Speaking; Universal Themes
    MAT: Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Cooperate; Judaism; Respect
    SOC: Parochial
K-2

Small Fish Stick Together (Kindergarten)

Students will pantomime a book; identify the themes of community, caring and sharing; describe the advantages of cooperation for the common good; and describe how the characters’ experiences are alike and different from their own experiences.

  1. Small Fish Stick Together (Kindergarten)

    ELA: Swimmy; Character Development; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Plot Development; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Need; Reflection
K-2

Smiles Change the World

Students will recognize the importance of friendship in a person's life and identify organizations that help those without friends.

  1. Friendship and Belonging

    ELA: Communicate; Voice
    PHIL: Friendship; Giving; Need; Serial Reciprocity
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Values
  2. Friendship Begins with a Smile

    ELA: Communicate
    PHIL: Friendship; Need; Serial Reciprocity
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
  3. Who Needs Friends?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Voice
    PHIL: Friendship; Need
    SOC: Decision Making Model
  4. Choosing Where to Act

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Cooperate; Friendship; Need
    SOC: Compare/Contrast
  5. Delivering Service

    PHIL: Friendship; Need; Service Project
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model
K-2

Souper Philanthropists (1st Grade)

This lesson will encourage students to think of ways that they can be (or have been) philanthropists. Using a puppet or doll to tell a story about going to a soup kitchen will help get the students excited about providing food for a soup kitchen.

  1. Souper Philanthropists

    ELA: Listening; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen; 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility; Sharing/Caring
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue
K-2

Souperservice Kids

Students gain awareness of the importance of healthy food. They will observe changes in food, explore tastes, harvest vegetables and discuss the daily food needs of all individuals. They will learn about the contributions of farmers to society. They will be introduced to the concept of homelessness as well as hunger in their own community. Students will also learn how they can help people who are hungry. With their families, they will be involved in a project to make a dry soup mixture to donate to individuals who attend a local soup kitchen.
  1. Harvesting the Produce

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Language/Style; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Predict
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Health; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Life Cycles; Observation; Plants
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Chronology
  2. Our Five Senses Affect Food Choices

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Health; Trust
    SCI: Experiment; Nature; Observation; Scientific Investigation; Senses
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Inquiry; Research
  3. Healthy Food Makes Healthy Body

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Listening
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Family; Health; Philanthropic Act; Sharing
    SCI: Classify; Food; Health
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Consumers; Geography; Opportunity Costs; Wants/Needs
  4. Farmers and the Food Connection

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Journaling; Writing
    MAT: Counting; Place-Value
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Common Good; Commons; Community; Cooperate; Health; Sharing
    SCI: Cycles; Nature; Observation; Plants
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Consumers; Inquiry; Production/Producer; Rights/Responsibilities
  5. Hunger and Homelessness

    ART: Theater: Perform; Visual Arts
    ELA: Sam and the Lucky Money; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Journaling; Listening; Perception; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Speaking
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Numbers; Place-Value; Shapes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Health; Homelessness; Hunger; Need; Philanthropic Act; Selflessness
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Community; Human Characteristics of Place; Resources
  6. Homelessness

    ART: Theater: Perform; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen; Group Discussions; Journaling; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Writing
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Health; Hunger; Philanthropic Act; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Consumers; Family; Public Policy; Resources
  7. We Are Philanthropists-Souperservice Families

    ART: Music: Perform
    MAT: Counting; Fractions; Measurement
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Family; Health; Service Project; Volunteer
    SCI: Measure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Goods and Services; Inquiry; Production/Producer
K-2

Spend, Save or Donate: Penny Drive

This lesson will introduce learners to the concept of raising resources to help others. The learners will discover reasons why people choose to donate.

  1. Spend, Save or Donate: Penny Drive

    PHIL: Charity; Common Good; Donate; Fundraising; Giving
    SOC: Budget; Choices/Consequences; Opportunity Costs
K-2

Talking Trees (2nd Grade)

In this lesson, students learn about the interconnectedness of nature and the impact of people on the environment. Students are motivated by literature to teach others the importance of trees in our ecosystem. In an optional Extension of the lesson, they design and make posters with a “Save the Trees” message.

  1. Talking Trees (2nd Grade)

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Listening; Response to Text/Others; Voice
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Activism; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Sensitivity
    SCI: Plants
    SOC: Environment
K-2

The Four R's: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, RESPECT!

This unit emphasizes the importance of reducing, reusing and recycling with a particular focus on the significance of respecting the environment and being good stewards of the Earth.  Using literature and hands-on activities, the concepts of reduce, reuse and recycle will be explored.  The culminating project will include students sharing their time and talent to make new paper from used classroom scrap paper.  The learners will act philanthropically by using the hand made, recycled paper to create cards to give to others in the community.

Focus Questions(s):
Is it the responsibility of everyone to reduce, reuse, and recycle?  How does that demonstrate respect for the Earth?
 

  1. Reduce and RESPECT!

    ELA: Wartville Wizard (The); Brainstorming; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Predicting; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Recycling; Reflection; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Pollution
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Environment; Pollution
  2. Reuse and RESPECT!

    ART: Music: Perform
    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Cooperate; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Recycling; Reflection; Respect; Teamwork; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Conservation; Critical Thinking; Environment; Natural Resources; Pollution
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Environment; Pollution
  3. Recycle and RESPECT!

    ART: Music: Perform
    ELA: Sir Johnny's Recycling Adventure; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Measure; Weight
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropist; Recycling; Reflection; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Conservation; Critical Thinking; Environment; Measure; Natural Resources; Pollution; Predicting; Weight
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Environment; Pollution
  4. Spreading Cheer by Recycling!

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Chronology; Journaling; Letter Writing; Reflection; Retelling
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropist; Recycling; Reflection; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Pollution
    SOC: Environment
K-2

This Land Is Our Land (Stewardship) (Private-Religious)

This unit teaches young students a sense of responsibility to take care of the environment that G-d created. It also demonstrates that even young students have the power to contribute to the community.  One main piece of this is the importance of recycling.  Students not only learn about the environment and creation, but also perform acts that preserve the environment.

Focus Questions:

What is the connection between creation and taking care of the environment?
Why is it important to take care of the environment?
What is my role in caring for the environment?

  1. Taking Care of Nature (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Listening; Predicting; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Judaism; Sensitivity; Stewardship; Values
    SCI: Plants; Pollution
    SOC: Environment; Parochial; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Repair, Reuse, Recycle (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Joseph Had a Little Overcoat; Brainstorming; Creative Writing; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Judaism; Recycling; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: Natural Resources; Parochial
  3. Give a Little Respect (Private-Religious)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Creative Writing; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Helping; Judaism; Respect
    SOC: Environment; Parochial
K-2

Trail Mix Project

 This lesson offers an opportunity for students to make a difference in their community regarding kids hunger. Students give their time to make Trail Mix, which they donate to a local agency (such as Kids Food Basket in Grand Rapids, MI). Also, students represent collected data using a bar graph and practice communication and letter-writing skills as they reflect and write a letter describing the event of making Trail Mix.

  1. Trail Mix Project

    ELA: Letter Writing; Non-Fiction Literature; Reading Literature; Reflection; Writing Type and Purpose
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; Donate; Family
    SOC: Nonprofit
K-2

Tzedakah: How Can We Help? (Tzedakah) (Private-Religious))

This unit demonstrates that charity is a fundamental concept of Judaism. It engages students not only in the learning, but through performing acts of charity.

Focus Questions:
What is tzedakah?
Why is tzedakah important for both the person who gives and receives?
Is tzedakah only about giving money?

  1. The Bare Necessities (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Activism; Caring/Sharing; Charity; Cooperate; Donate; Empathy; Giving; Helping; Homelessness; Hunger; Judaism; Kindness; Motivation for Giving; Need; Sensitivity; Service Learning; Service Project; Social Action
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Parochial; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action; Values; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs
  2. Share Your Bread (Private-Religious)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Brainstorming; Creative Writing; Letter Writing; Presentations; Speaking
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Charity; Contribute; Cooperate; Donate; Giving; Helping; Homelessness; Hunger; Judaism; Motivation for Giving; Need; Philanthropic Act; Sensitivity; Service Learning; Service Project
    SOC: Parochial; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action
  3. Meal Math (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Listening; Presentations
    MAT: Addition; Counting; Money
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Charity; Contribute; Cooperate; Donate; Empathy; Giving; Helping; Hunger; Judaism; Kindness; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Sensitivity; Service Learning; Sharing
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Common Good; Parochial; Social Action
K-2

United We Stand (2nd Grade)

In a world of us vs. them, how do children develop a sense of community? In this lesson, our children will gain an understanding of community as people who work, learn, play and live together. Through the activities in this lesson, children internalize the value of being a responsible community member.

  1. United We Stand (2nd Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Concept Mapping; Group Discussions; Teamwork; Vocabulary; Writing Process
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Trust
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Cooperative Groups
K-2

Unity in the Community

So many of our students see themselves as individuals and have not made connections to "community." Is there strength in uniting? How do children develop a sense of community? In this unit, students will begin to view their family, friends and school as a community where people live, work and play together for the common good. Students will explore game-playing as an activity to build community. As a culminating activity, host a family "Make-It, Take-It Night" where families make games and then are able to take their games home for continued "community building."

  1. United We Are

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate; Family
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Family; School Community
  2. United We Stand

    ELA: Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch; Brainstorming; Concept Mapping; Group Discussions; Teamwork; Vocabulary; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Trust
    SOC: Communities; Cooperative Groups
  3. The Family as a Community

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Families Are Different; Fiction Literature; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Community; Reflection
    SOC: Communities; Diversity; Family
  4. Friends

    ART-M: Music: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Rainbow Fish (The); Listening; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Communities; Cooperate
    SOC: Communities; Good Character
  5. Playing Group Games from the Past

    ELA: Group Discussions; Personal Response; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; Family; Rules; Traditions
    SOC: Communities; Compare/Contrast; Cooperative Groups; Family; School Community; Timelines
  6. Make-It, Take-It Family Night

    ELA: Communicate; Teamwork
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; Cooperate; Family
    SOC: Communities; Cooperative Groups; Family; School Community; Traditions
K-2

Upon the Clouds of Equality (1st Grade)

The students experience a simulation demonstrating unequal treatment and discuss justice and fairness. Students will reflect on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream of equality and his actions as a philanthropist.

  1. Upon the Clouds of Equality (1st Grade)

    ELA: Martin's Big Words: Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (The); Biography; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Listening; Personal Response; Reflection; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Activism; African American; Common Good; Justice; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; Civil Rights; Conflict Resolution; Good Character; Segregation
K-2

Using Our Talents for the Common Good

Students will realize they have talents that can be used for the common good and that there are groups (foundations) that provide funds for the implementation of service projects. The students will write a grant request to a foundation and carry out a service project.
  1. What Are Our Talents?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Community; Cultures; Native Peoples
  2. How Can Our Talents Be Used Together?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Journaling; Poetry; Reading; Reflection
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Good Character; Service Plan; Values; Volunteer
  3. Who Can We Help?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Letter Writing; Reflection
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Survey; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue
  4. What Is a Foundation?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Listening
    PHIL: Foundations; Grantmaking; Need; Philanthropist
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Government
  5. Service Project

    ELA: Poetry; Reflection
    PHIL: Need; Service Project
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue
K-2

Volunteering as Good Work

The students will learn about the volunteers who help in the school. They will decide a way to show their appreciation to those volunteers and be encouraged to find ways that they can be a volunteer to help others.

  1. School Worker Guessing Game

    ELA: Expository Writing
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Respect; School Climate
    SOC: Common Good; Goods and Services; School Community
  2. Yea For Volunteers!

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Vocabulary; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: School Community; Volunteerism
  3. Ask a Volunteer!

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Interview; Letter Writing; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: Character; Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Opportunity Costs; Volunteer
    SOC: School Community; Volunteerism
  4. Thank You!

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Letter Writing
    PHIL: Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Volunteer
    SOC: School Community; Volunteerism
  5. What Can I Do?

    ART-VA: Music: Perform; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; School Climate; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; School Community; Volunteerism
K-2

Watch Me Grow

Through four lessons students will understand the concept of Environmental Stewardship. Using a children’s story about a neighborhood working together to improve the appearance of a vacant lot, student will decide how they will participate in a community project to beautify their community and becoming Stewards of the Earth.

Focus Questions: Why do we need plants? Who's responsibility is it to be an Environmental Steward of the natural world?

  1. Garden for Life

    ELA: Expository Writing; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act
    SCI: Nature; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Environment
  2. Plants are Growing and Changing

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Expository Text; Non-Fiction Literature; Predicting; Questioning
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Learning
    SCI: Life Science; Predict
    SOC: 4 genOn
  3. Talking Trees

    ART-T: Theater: Perform
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Listening; Response to Text/Others; Voice
    PHIL: Activism; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Sensitivity
    SCI: Environment; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Common Good; Environment
  4. Understanding the Roots

    ART-T: Theater: Perform
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Journaling; Listening; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Environment; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Common Good
K-2

Water Makes Our World Go 'Round

 Water is essential to all life; however it is not abundant in many areas. In order to preserve our usable water resources, water conservation needs to be a component of everyday life. Conservation can be done in a variety of ways. Through the completion of this unit, learners will develop an understanding of the water cycle, how to measure rainfall (water) and why it is essential to conserve this precious resource. Learners are able to display their ability to be a good citizen and stewards of the Earth by educating those around them about how these things can be done.

  1. Water, Glorious Water

    ELA: Drop Around the World (A); Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Listening; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Speaking; Visual Media
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Problem Solving; Reflection
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Predict; Wants/Needs; Water; Weather
    SOC: Environment
  2. Where Does Water Come From: The Water Cycle

    ART: Skills; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Magic School Bus Wet All Over: A Book About The Water Cycle (The); Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Speaking; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Air; Conservation; Cycles; Evaporation; Heat; Observation; Water; Weather
  3. Measure It Up!

    ELA: Water: Up Down, and All Around (Amazing Science); Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Tables
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Estimation; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Measurement; Predict
    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Conservation; Cycles; Evaporation; Heat; Observation; Water; Weather
    SOC: Environment
  4. Save That Water!

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Why Should I Save Water?; Group Discussions; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Problem Solving; School Climate; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Cycles; Reasoning; Water; Weather
    SOC: Environment
K-2

We Can All Do Our Share

Students will describe acts of philanthropy that are possible for persons of any age to do and will recognize that personal acts of heroism are carried out every day in the community.
  1. Compliments

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Compliments; Giving; Reflection; Respect; Serial Reciprocity
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Good Character; Inquiry
  2. I'm a Philanthropist!

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Community; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character
  3. Heroes in Our Community

    ELA: Children's Book of Real Heroes (The); Compare/Contrast; Listening; Reading; Research; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 5 genOn; 9/11genOn; Heroes; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Good Character; Values
K-2

We Can All Do Our Share:
Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (K)

This unit introduces the word and concept of philanthropy as giving time, talent and treasure for the common good. It teaches Kindergarten students about personal conduct and encourages an understanding of group cooperation. Students experience the beneficial effects when people accomplish a task by working together as a group for the common good.

  1. I'm a Philanthropist! Philanthropy Lesson (K)

    PHIL: Community; Giving; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character
  2. Picture-Go-Round: Philanthropy Lesson (K)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; School Climate
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Conflict Resolution; Cooperate; Interdependence; Personal Virtue
  3. Rolling in Dough: Philanthropy Lesson (K)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Cooperate; School Rules
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Conflict Resolution; Responsibility
K-2

What Is a Community? (1st Grade)

This lesson introduces the definition of community, and challenges students to explore the characteristics of their own community and the importance of giving to the community.
  1. What Is a Community? (1st Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Non-Fiction Literature; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Helping; Neighborhood
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; School Community
K-2

What Will You Bring to the Table? (K-2)

Students draw on the image of a table to make a plan for bringing their time, talent, and treasure to the table for children who are hungry in the community. Using the table as a theme, students carry out a service-learning project that addresses the issue of child hunger in the United States. This lesson includes an optional field trip for a simple community mapping activity.

Focus Question: What are some ways we can set a table for children who are hungry in our community?

  1. Set the Table

    ELA: Key Ideas and Details; Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas; Reading Literature; Teamwork; Writing Type and Purpose
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Community; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: 11 genon; Common Good; Maps/Globes; Resources
K-2

What's All the Commotion in the Ocean?

For learners to be good stewards of the Earth they need to know how to help take care of the environment. “What’s All the Commotion in the Ocean?” is a unit to enhance children’s learning about ocean animals, pollution and how children can make a difference by being good stewards of the Earth’s water resources. The children will learn about ocean animals, the ocean environment and how to take care of the ocean environment.  They will develop possible answers to the question: What can we do to help the ocean environment? These discussions will lead to a culminating writing activity. The children will write a letter to an organization to find out how to help clean up our oceans.  While learning about taking care of the ocean environment they will learn that they are acting responsibly for the common good.

Focus Question: What can we do to help the ocean environment?

  1. What's in the Water?

    ELA: House For Hermit Crab (A); Magic School Bus On The Ocean Floor (The); Journaling; Listening; Non-Fiction Literature; Retelling
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Responsibility
    SCI: Animals; Environment; Natural Resources; Pollution
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Environment
  2. Do Fish Clean the Ocean?

    ELA: Coral Reef Hideaway: The Story of a Clown Anemone Fish; Journaling; Listening; Retelling
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Animals; Organisms; Water
  3. Seashore Sweep

    ELA: At the Seashore; Journaling; Listening; Retelling
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Animals; Organisms; Water
  4. How Can We Help?

    ELA: Do You Know Where Sea Turtles Go?; Journaling; Listening; Retelling
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Animals; Organisms; Water
K-2

Where Does It All Come From? Penny Drive

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the learners to the concept that community organizations need resources (money and materials) to help people in need.

  1. Where Does It All Come From? Penny Drive

    ELA: Listening; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Common Good; Donate; Fundraising; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Community
K-2

You Can Bank on Me!

In this unit, the students learn the meaning of the words spend, save and donate. They collect money to donate and use a decision-making model to choose the recipient. They also practice their skills with identifying and counting coins.
  1. Spend, Save or Donate

    ELA: Sam and the Lucky Money; Listening; Literature; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Donate; Giving; Personal Giving Plan; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Economics; Resources
  2. Comparing Attitudes about Money

    ELA: Fiction Literature; Personal Response; Point of View; Response to Text/Others; Retelling
    SOC: 10 genOn; Economics; Family; Goods and Services; Spending
  3. Decision-Making Model

    ELA: Questioning; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Survey
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Donate; Need; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Communities; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs; Resources
  4. Drop, Sort and Count!

    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Money; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Cooperate; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 10 genOn; Currency; Goods and Services
  5. My Bank, My Decision!

    ART: Visual Arts
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Personal Giving Plan; Personal Wealth; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Economics; Resources
K-2

You Can Make a Difference (1st Grade)

This lesson will teach children about volunteers and the difference they make in our world. The children will conclude that even they can volunteer and make a difference in their community.

  1. You Can Make a Difference (1st Grade)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Reflection
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; Community; Need; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Human Capital; Human Characteristics of Place
K-2
Unit Title & Purpose Lesson Titles & Key Words Grades

Animal Shelters

This unit will introduce the learners to the important mission and needs of animal shelters, both private and municipal. Learners will understand that they can contribute to animal welfare by aiding a shelter(s) and educating others about the work of shelters.
Through research and class discussion, the learners will be introduced to Animal Welfare and Animal Shelters. They will examine the different types of shelters. They will also explore some of the reasons that animals are surrendered to shelters, services that shelters provide, some of the jobs that volunteers and others can do to help in shelters and calculate the cost of running a shelter.  Learners will plan and implement a service project to aid a shelter.  They will demonstrate their knowledge about animal shelters by sharing their knowledge with their peers

Focus Question:
Who is responsible for the humane care and welfare of homeless animals? 
 

  1. Sheltering and Caring for Animals

    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Environmental Stewardship; Kindness; Non profit; Sharing
    SOC: Common Good; Communities
  2. Costs of Providing for Animals

    MAT: Addition; Comparing Numbers; Data Collection/Organization; Estimation; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Multiplication; Problem Solving
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Environmental Stewardship; Kindness; Service Learning; Sharing
    SOC: Costs; Economics; Nonprofit; Spending
  3. Collecting for Animal Shelters

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Buddy Unchained; Audience; Group Discussions
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Act of Kindness; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Donate; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; Helping; Kindness; Philanthropy; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good
  4. Sharing our Knowledge

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Audience; Brainstorming; Creative Writing; Informational Genre; Peer Review; Writing Process
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Non profit; Philanthropy; Volunteering
3-5

Art for the Common Good—Junkanoo! (3-5)

The purpose of this unit is to encourage students to examine the way groups work together for the common good and understand how specific factions in communities preserve their culture through the arts. In a fun and creative activity, groups will consider how to be more effective in cooperative learning. Students will learn about the Bahamian Festival, Junkanoo, while making headdresses in groups. They will examine how group dynamics work, especially when minority rights need to be protected.

  1. Introduction to Junkanoo! A Bahamian Festival (3-5)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: History/Culture
    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Electronic Text; Expository Writing; Group Discussions; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Community; Community Capital; Human Rights; Traditions; Trust
    SOC: 12 genOn; Common Good; Community; Community Capital; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Discrimination; Factions; Inquiry; Junkanoo (Bahamian Festival); Migration; Minorities; Mobility; Pluralism; Populations; Primary/Secondary Sources; Racism; Research; Slavery; Tolerance; Traditions
  2. Group Headdresses (3-5)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Community Capital; Human Rights; Minorities
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community Capital; Factions; Junkanoo (Bahamian Festival); Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations
  3. Junkanoo Parade (3-5) (A)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Perform
    PHIL: Service Learning
    SOC: Cultures
3-5

Banking on the Future: Penny Drive

This lesson will emphasize why a legacy of philanthropy is needed now and for future generations. Learners will discover that individuals and organizations give special kinds of money gifts called endowments to nonprofit organizations and foundations. In this way the work of the organization can continue in perpetuity (forever).

  1. Banking on the Future: Penny Drive

    ELA: Universal Themes
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Endowment; Foundations; Fundraising
    SOC: Capital; Economics; Nonprofit; Opportunity Costs
3-5

Building a Mini-Park and Bird Sanctuary

This unit is designed to introduce students to the joys of having and caring for a garden. Students will take an active role in Environmental Stewardship by adding beauty to their surroundings. It will help them understand what is needed to create and care for a garden in order for the garden to thrive and the interconnectedness to the environment that a garden provides.  The long-term result will be to create a quiet area for students and others to read or study in a pleasant outdoor environment or location in the community or neighborhood to be shared by all. Once the garden is complete, it will be given to the local community for all to share.

  1. Sharing the Joy of a Garden

    ELA: Perception; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Environment; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn
  2. Helping Others with a Garden

    ELA: Grandpa’s Garden; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Garden; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Nature; Volunteer
    SCI: Ecosystems; Environment
    SOC: 4 genOn
  3. Location, Location, Location

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Problem Solving; Service Project
    SCI: Ecosystems; Environment; Garden
    SOC: 4 genOn
  4. What's in a Garden?

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act
    SCI: Ecosystems; Environment; Garden
    SOC: 4 genOn
  5. And Now, What to Plant?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Project
    SCI: Environment; Garden; Nature; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn
  6. Soil Testing and Measurement

    ELA: Questioning; Research
    MAT: Measurement; Metric/Customary Measure
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Problem Solving; Service Project
    SCI: Experiment; Garden
  7. Preparing and Planting the Garden

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Service Project
    SCI: Environment; Garden; Nature
3-5

Bully-Free Zone

In this unit, students learn to identify bullying through two literature books, Mr. Lincoln's Way and The Secret Bully.  They compare and contrast two examples of bullying portrayed in the books and create a peer/staff survey to research bullying behavior in their own school. The students experience and reflect on a literature book written from the view point of a reformed bully, Confessions of a Former Bully. They analyze the data collected from their survey to determine how bullying behavior affects their school. The students learn that addressing bullying behavior in their school community is an act for the common good - philanthropy. They form groups to develop skits that illustrate "tools" for addressing bullying behavior. They compose a pledge to address and prevent bullying behavior in their school community. As a service to their school, they plan and implement a project to inform the school community about the effects of bullying behavior and strategies to address it.

Focus Question: How does bullying behavior affect the school community and what is each person's responsibility to address it?

  1. Identifying a Bully

    ELA: Character Perception; Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Group Discussion; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Social/Cultural Issues; Survey; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Stereotypes
    SOC: Bullying
  2. Discovering the Facts

    ELA: Character Perception; Fiction Literature; Group Discussion; Point of View; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Interpret; Percent
    PHIL: Activism; Bullying; Helping; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character
  3. Acting for the Common Good

    ELA: Presentations; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Bullying; Conflict Resolution; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
3-5

Closer to the Ground

The lessons in this unit will focus on the role of foundations and how they help cultural subgroups within communities. It will also define philanthropy and increase the students' knowledge about how it allows individuals to contribute to their community locally by allowing the students to make some decisions about how they will raise money to be donated to a local organization.

  1. Sharing the Wealth

    PHIL: Fundraising; Grantmaking; Philanthropist; Problem Solving; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: For-Profit; Inquiry; Nonprofit
  2. Providing a Helping Hand

    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Corporate Philanthropy; Fundraising
    SOC: Common Good; Industry
  3. Forecast Sunny and Warm

    ELA: Alexander Who Used To Be Rich Last Sunday
    PHIL: Endowment; Foundations; Fundraising
    SOC: Aesop’s Fables; Capital; Economics; Opportunity Costs
  4. People Take the Stand

    PHIL: Benefits; Contribute; Fundraising; Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Stewardship
    SOC: Kid's Guide to Social Action (The); Patchwork Quilt (The); Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes; Cultures
3-5

Common Good in Colonial America

This unit will define philanthropy by providing opportunities for students to examine the prevailing conditions in colonial America that prompted individuals to establish organizations which promoted the common good. They will find examples in literature of the simple act of doing something for the common good. Learners will research how colonial organizations, which developed in the nonprofit/ independent sector, have transformed themselves over time to continue to provide for the common good.

  1. Growing Up

    ELA: Point of View; Research
    PHIL: Common Good; Nonprofit Sector; Philanthropic Organization; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 8 genOn; Chronology; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Common Good; Timelines
  2. Name Game (The)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Miss Rumphius; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Perception; Research
    PHIL: Common Good; Helping
    SOC: Franklin, Benjamin; Harvard, John; Lay, Benjamin; 8 genOn; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Common Good; Historical Biographies; Powhatan; Quakers; Squanto
  3. Learning from the Past: A New Approach

    PHIL: Common Good; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Project
    SOC: 8 genOn; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Library Company of Philadelphia; Pennsylvania Hospital; Smithsonian Institute
3-5

Community Health and Safety

Through fact-finding and a community survey, students identify health and safety needs in their school and/or neighborhood communities.  Based on their conclusions they collaboratively problem solve, design, and carry out a plan to address those problems.

  1. Visualizing Health and Safety

    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning
    PHIL: Cooperate; Needs Assessment; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Wants/Needs
  2. Assessing Needs through a Survey

    ELA: Survey
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Needs Assessment
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement
  3. Organizing Survey Data

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Survey; Teamwork
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Responsibility
    SOC: Cooperation; Research
  4. Improving Health and Safety

    ART: Music; Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Presentations; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Health and Disease; Volunteerism
3-5

Community Philanthropy: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (4th)

Students will define philanthropy and recognize philanthropic activities. They will identify examples of philanthropy in literature. Students will learn about the contributions made by Benjamin Franklin to the common good. They will categorize his accomplishments in the nonprofit, business and government sectors. They will select and illustrate a quote from Franklin that they would like to apply to their own lives.

  1. Story of Philanthropy (A): Philanthropy Lesson (4th)

    ELA: Fiction Literature; Listening; Reading; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement
  2. Benjamin Franklin - Philanthropist:
    Philanthropy Lesson (4th)

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Poor Richard’s Almanack; Non-Fiction Literature; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: Franklin, Benjamin; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources
3-5

Community Table-Community Ties (3rd Grade)

  1. Community Table-Community Ties

    ELA: Listening; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Giving; Responsibility
3-5

Cool Kids Compost

Through a food-waste survey in the lunchroom, the learners explore what gets thrown in the lunch trash at school and learn about earth-friendly alternatives that reduce waste in landfills, including recycling and composting. Learners discover the benefits of compost and reasons to promote it in the community. They share their knowledge with others through implementing a student-generated and planned service project. 

Focus Question: What can we do to promote responsible use of all resources?

  1. A Messy Survey

    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Reflection; Teamwork; Visual Media; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Estimation; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 4 genOn; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Stewardship
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Organisms; Recycling
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Environment; Natural Resources; Research; School Community
  2. Rotten Research

    ELA: Informational Media; Non-Fiction Literature; Questioning; Research; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Compare/Contrast; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Invertebrates; Observation; Recycling; Scientific Investigation
    SOC: Common Good; Environment; Research; Resources
  3. Got Dirt?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Expository Writing; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection
    PHIL: 4 genOn; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service; Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Environment; Resources
3-5

Core Democratic Values in Action

In this unit, the students analyze the importance of the Core Democratic Values in the context of a 1910 African American family, their home and school rules and in simple conflict resolution.
  1. What Are Our Common Values?

    ELA: Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Historical Fiction; Response to Text/Others; Voice
    PHIL: African American; Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Bill of Rights; Civil Rights; Common Good; Core Democratic Values
  2. CDVs at Home and School

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Concept Mapping; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; School Climate; School Rules
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Core Democratic Values; Rules
  3. Role Playing for the Common Good

    ART-T: Theater: Analyze; Theater: Create/Communicate; Theater: Perform
    ELA: Audience; Character Development; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Conflict Resolution; School Climate; School Rules; Social Capital
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Community Capital; Core Democratic Values
3-5

Courage Comes In All Sizes (3rd Grade)

Using poetry, this lesson explores the attributes of a hero and the philanthropic acts that are achieved in spite of adversity, for the common good of all humankind.

  1. Courage Comes In All Sizes (3rd Grade)

    ELA: Listening; Poetry; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Activism; Caring/Sharing; Helping; Heroes; Justice; Philanthropic Act; Respect; Social Action; Trust
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Good Character
3-5

Courageous Voices that Shook the Nation to Action
(3rd Grade)

Using literature and music, this lesson explores the implementation of Dr. Martin Luther King's birth date as a United States national holiday. Students will listen to a story about the celebration of his birthday  and hear about the quest of those who fought to have it legally recognized . In addition, students will view the lyrics of Stevie Wonder's Happy Birthday and discover how it fueled the campaign to proclaim Dr. King as a national hero.
  1. Courageous Voices that Shook the Nation to Action
    (3rd Grade)

    ELA: Happy Birthday Martin Luther King; Communicate; Listening; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Act of Kindness; African American; Common Good; Justice; Kindness; Sacrifice
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Discrimination; Good Character; Justice; Rights/Responsibilities
3-5

Different! Diverse! Dynamic! (3-5)

The purpose of this unit is to increase students’ awareness of the differences among us. Through identification of and participation in service activities, the students will gain a better understanding of others’ unique characteristics. Acceptance of individual differences and understanding of developmental differences is the overarching behavior outcome of the unit. The unit strives to instill the concept of tolerance to enhance the common good.

  1. Late Bloomers (3-5)

    ELA: Reading; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Numbers
    PHIL: Respect
    SCI: Heredity
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Common Good; Diversity; Good Character; Timelines; Tolerance; Values
  2. Teaching Peace through Literature and Song (3-5)

    ART: Music: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Thank You, Mr. Falker; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Theme
    PHIL: Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Discrimination; Diversity; Human Rights
  3. What Do Stories Share? (3-5)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Theme; Writing Process
    PHIL: Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Tolerance
  4. Looks Like Respect, Sounds Like Respect, Feels Like (3-5)

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Constructing Meaning
    PHIL: Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity; Ethics; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Values
  5. I Feel Angry or Sad When… (3-5)

    ART: Theater: Interdisciplinary; Theater: Perform
    PHIL: Altruism; Cooperate; Empathy; Ennobled Self; Selflessness
    SOC: 1 genOn; Common Good; Ethics; Good Character; Rule of Law; Tolerance
  6. Is There a Stone in My Soup? (3-5)

    ELA: Stone Soup; Interview; Writing Process
    MAT: Estimation; Numbers; Patterns
    PHIL: Cooperate; Giving; Need; Reflection; Respect; Survey; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; Common Good; Diversity; Rules; Volunteerism
3-5

Disaster Relief - You Can Count On Me! (3-5)

This lesson introduces learners to opportunities to respond to a natural disaster. The lesson introduces vocabulary terms spend, save, and donate. The students learn the definition of philanthropy (giving time, talent and treasure, and taking action for the common good) as well as explore reasons why people choose to donate. As a class, they will discuss and sing the song "What is a Philanthropist?"

Focus Question: How can we best help people who are victims of a natural disaster?

To access this lesson, please click here.

  1. Disaster Relief - You Can Count On Me! (3-5)

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    ELA: Sam and the Lucky Money; Listening; Literature; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Counting; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 9/11genOn; Donate; Emergency Response; Giving; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Disaster: Natural; Maps
3-5

Diverse Community: Who Is My Neighbor? (3-5)

The group creates mosaics to represent the diversity within their community. Students identify on a map and in discussion the geographic location and culture of their ancestors. They explore reasons that people moved to the U.S. and discuss the importance of keeping their culture, like a mosaic, rather than losing their culture in order to "fit in."  Students interview and write a story about a person in their family or community. They share their stories to celebrate the unique differences in people in the community.

Focus Question: In what ways does diversity make a community stronger?

  1. Mosaic of Life

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Metaphor
    PHIL: Community; Cooperate; Neighborhood
    SOC: Communities; Cultures
  2. Where in the World?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Historical Fiction; Narrative Writing; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Community; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Communities; Cultures; Diversity; Geography
  3. Neighbor Interviews

    ELA: Interview; Narrative Writing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community
    SOC: Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Global Issues
3-5

Diverse Voices-African American Ventures

Students will become familiar with African American humanitarian efforts that promoted philanthropy and had a significant effect on the African American community.
  1. Getting the Hang of Philanthropy

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Interview; Literary Response; Media Genres; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Research; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Writing Mechanics
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Family; Giving; Traditions; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; African American; Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Choices/Consequences; Chronology; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Community Capital; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Decision Making Model; Democracy; Diversity; Economics; Ethics; Family; Freedom; Good Character; Human Rights; Inquiry; Justice; Minorities; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Racism; Research; Slavery; Timelines; Tolerance; Volunteerism
  2. Piece of Bread (A)

    ELA: Seven Spools of Thread; Brainstorming; Character Development; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Literary Response; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Technology; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Family; Giving
    SOC: 12 genOn; African American; Analyze/Interpret; Chronology; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Community Capital; Cultures; Decision Making Model; Democracy; Family; Good Character; Government; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Kwanzaa; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Research; Timelines
  3. It's a Matter of Freedom

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Compare/Contrast; Literary Response; Media Genres; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Primary/Secondary Sources; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Technology; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Cooperate; Philanthropic Act; Traditions
    SOC: African American; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Cultures; Good Character; Inquiry; Patriotism; Personal Virtue; Volunteerism
  4. Underground Railroad—People Get Ready...There's a Train a Comin'

    ELA: Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Media Genres; Point of View; Technology
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 2 genOn; Abolition; African American; Chronology; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Constitution of the United States; Core Democratic Values; Freedom; Good Character; Human Rights; Inquiry; Maps; Patriotism; Personal Virtue; Quakers; Underground Railroad; Volunteerism
  5. It's All in the Making—Our Local Organizations

    ELA: Group Discussions; Interview; Letter Writing; Listening; Literary Response; Media Genres; Presentations; Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Technology; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Cooperate; Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; African American; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Inquiry; Maps; NAACP; National Urban League; Nonprofit Organizations; Research; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs
3-5

Do Not Stand Idly By (Private-Religious)

Students become actively engaged in the process of perfecting the world through acts of kindness. They learn to value endeavors that benefit others and study ancestors who have proven to be particularly adept at helping others.

Throughout the unit, they continuously ask themselves:

What actions will benefit others and thereby make this world a better place?

How can I fulfill my responsibility to take part in these activities?

  1. Piecing Together the Puzzle (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Tikkun Olam; 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Judaism; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Traditions; Religious Perspectives; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Parochial; Primary/Secondary Sources; Religion
  2. Jewish Heroes Congress (Private-Religious)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Biography; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Heroes; Judaism; Philanthropist; Religious Perspectives
    SOC: Historical Biographies; Parochial
  3. Following in Their Footsteps (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Research
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Community; Judaism; Service Plan; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: Parochial
3-5

Dreaming of Gardens (5th Grade)

Students will listen to two stories, and compare and contrast the activities of the main characters. As a final piece, students reflect by writing an answer to some essential questions: What does it mean to be a philanthropist? What does it mean to be an environmentalist? What does it mean to be a good steward of the earth?

  1. Dreaming of Gardens (5th Grade)

    ELA: Just a Dream; Compare/Contrast; Reflection
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropist; Responsibility; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Environment
3-5

Each One, Teach One

Concepts of literacy and reading competency with themes of philanthropy and stewardship are employed to address issues of literacy and increase awareness of the importance of reading to young children early and often.
  1. Setting the Stage

    ELA: Fiction Literature; Perception; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Altruism; Foundations; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 4 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Public Policy
  2. Kids Helping Kids

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Reading; Reflection; Story Elements; Voice
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Service Project; Youth Club
    SOC: 4 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement
  3. Authors Shall We Be

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Audience; Story Elements; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Need; Service Learning; Service Project
    SOC: 4 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement
3-5

Earth Connections

The purpose of this unit is for students to expand their awareness of the earth through the study of some traditional Native American beliefs about the concept of “mother earth.” They will discover the need to protect the environment and their responsibility to do that for the common good through action and advocacy. They will learn about pollution through scientific investigation and how to demonstrate environmental stewardship by protecting the environment through reusing, reducing and recycling. They will make a personal commitment to the environment through planning and implementing a service learning project. They will brainstorm strategies to protect the environment and carry out a service learning project to enhance the environment for the common good.

Focus Questions:

  • How do humans and the natural world interact?
  • What makes a good citizen?
  • Can one person make a difference?
  1. "Mother Earth" - Past

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky ; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Native Americans; Stewardship; Traditions
    SCI: Environment; Nature
    SOC: 4 genOn; Cultures; Ecosystems; Environment; Ethics; Good Character; Native Peoples; Opportunity Costs; Personal Virtue; Scarcity
  2. "Mother Earth" - Present

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Poetry; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Native Americans; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment; Nature
    SOC: 4 genOn; Cultures; Environment; Good Character; Personal Virtue
  3. Let's Experiment!

    ELA: Expository Text
    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Needs Assessment; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment; Experiment; Measure; Nature; Observation
    SOC: 4 genOn
  4. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Literary Response
    PHIL: Common Good; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Need; Recycling; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Nature; Pollution
    SOC: 4 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Core Democratic Values; Environment; Resources
  5. Looking at the Data

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Listening; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Need; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Nature; Observation
  6. Let's Make a Plan

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Needs Assessment; Service Project
    SCI: Environment; Natural Resources; Nature; Observation; Pollution
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Public Policy
3-5

Endangered Species--It's Not Too Late

The purpose of this unit is to help the learners become aware of endangered species and explore one of the ways in which people can become good stewards of the environment by helping to prevent endangered species from becoming extinct. The learners will also be involved in philanthropy through the philanthropic act of fund-raising in order to "adopt" an endangered species. 

  1. What Are Endangered Species?

    ELA: Questioning; Technology
    PHIL: Advocacy; Need; Problem Solving; Reflection
    SCI: Animals; Conservation; Ecosystems; Environment; Habitat; Plants; Pollution
  2. Create to Educate!

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Fact/Opinion; Literary Response; Non-Fiction Literature; Presentations; Research; Resources; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Advocacy; Need; Problem Solving; Reflection
    SCI: Adaptation; Animals; Conservation; Ecosystems; Environment; Habitat; Natural Resources; Nature; Plants; Pollution
  3. Adopt a Species!

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Reflection
    MAT: Addition; Counting; Money
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Activism; Advocacy; Contribute; Donate; Fundraising; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Need; Philanthropic Act; Service Learning; Service Project
    SOC: Democracy; Voting
3-5

Environment: Sustaining Our World (3-5)

Students participate in a trash clean-up and analyze the issue of pollution due to trash, especially plastics. They discuss who should be responsible for preventing or cleaning up pollution - government, business, charitable organizations, and/or individuals.  Students learn about a great patch of garbage, mostly plastic and twice as big as Texas, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. They learn the effects of plastic garbage on the environment, including the lives of animals.  The students take action by determining ways to reduce their own use of plastic bags and by advocating for ways to reduce the use of plastic bags in their own households, the community, state and nation.  The students may propose ways to influence government officials to change laws so plastic bags are banned, taxed, or not given out for free.

 

  1. The Garbage Patch

    PHIL: 4 genOn
    SCI: ; Pollution; Water
    SOC: Economic Sectors
  2. What About All That Plastic?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Personal Response; Viewing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Global Community
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Pollution; Water
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/VirtueDisaster: Human-Made; Common Good
  3. The Great Garbage Patch

    ELA: Brainstorming; Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Service
    SCI: Pollution; Water
3-5

Exploring Nonprofit Career Opportunities

The lessons in this unit are designed to help learners, using the Action Without Borders/Idealist.org Web Site, become more aware of how nonprofit organizations benefit communities, recognize that different job opportunities are available in the nonprofit sector and understand that these jobs may require different abilities and skills.

  1. Exploring Nonprofits

    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Communities; Inquiry
  2. Who Works for Nonprofits?

    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Career Opportunities; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Goods and Services; Inquiry
3-5

Exploring Nonprofit Careers

To define the difference between profit and nonprofit organizations and the types of careers that are involved with their operation. The concepts will be taught through the creation of and performance of a musical production.
  1. Nonprofit and Profit Careers

    ELA: Letter Writing; Research
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
    SOC: Capital Equipment; Economics; Goods and Services; Human Capital; Natural Resources
  2. Researching Careers

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
    SOC: Capital Equipment; Human Capital; Inquiry; Natural Resources
  3. Designing the Careers Show

    ART: Dance; Music
    ELA: Presentations
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
    SOC: Goods and Services
  4. In Production

    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate; Theater: Perform
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
    SOC: Goods and Services
  5. Showtime! Profit or Non

    ART-T: Theater: Perform
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
    SOC: Goods and Services; Human Capital
3-5

Family Lessons in Philanthropy (5th Grade)

Students will respond to a literature book about family philanthropy. They will apply/compare their own philanthropic family acts to ideas for volunteering their time and talent to meet needs in the school or greater community.

  1. Family Lessons in Philanthropy (5th Grade)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Literary Response
    PHIL: Patchwork Quilt (The); 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Respect; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Family; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Tolerance; Traditions
3-5

Finding Our Bonds (4th Grade)

Using a simulation and literature book, students will explore the discrimination, prejudice and stereotypes. They will explore the importance of respect for diversity and their role in promoting a civil society focused on justice and equality.

  1. Finding Our Bonds (4th Grade)

    ELA: Point of View; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Friendship; Justice; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Respect; Stereotypes; Tolerance; Trust
    SOC: Diversity; Equality; Rights/Responsibilities
3-5

Foundations and You

This lesson introduces the definition of philanthropy and its importance to and effects on the community. Students also learn the definition of a foundation and become familiar with the Learning to Give Website. A representative of a local foundation speaks to the class about the foundation’s mission, activities and funding. Students write a grant proposal to a Youth Advisory Committee to support a local youth initiative.
  1. "Phil"-ing Good

    ELA: Chair For My Mother (A); Communicate; Journaling; Literary Response; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Common Good; Fundraising; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Social Capital; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; Community Capital; Wants/Needs
  2. Solid Foundation

    ELA: Electronic Text; Journaling; Letter Writing; Listening; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Charity; Common Good; Community Foundation; Fundraising; Grantmaking
    SOC: 1 genOn; Budget; Common Good; Communities; Foundations; Nonprofit; Resource Allocation
  3. Let's Write a Grant Proposal!

    ELA: Electronic Text; Research; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Charity; Common Good; Community Foundation; Fundraising; Grantmaking; Service Learning
    SOC: Budget; Common Good; Communities; Cooperative Groups; Foundations; Nonprofit; Resource Allocation
3-5

Freedom to Choose

Students explore the motivation of the pilgrims and recognize that freedom of choice is important to them as they choose a service project.
  1. No Choice!

    ELA: How Many Days to America?; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Historical Fiction; Journaling; Point of View; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Religious Perspectives; Respect; Sensitivity; Tolerance
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Freedom; Religion
  2. The Mayflower Compact—Freedom Contract

    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate; Theater: Perform
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Journaling; Point of View
    PHIL: Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Religious Perspectives
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Freedom; Mayflower Compact; Opportunity Costs; Primary/Secondary Sources; Religion
  3. Volunteering Requires Freedom of Choice

    ART: Theater: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Opportunity Costs; Service Plan; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Freedom
3-5

Global Education: Why Learn? (3-5)

Students play a game that explores the difference between rights and privileges and challenges their expectations about basic rights. Students will explore the issue of education as a right that not everyone has access to. Students listen and respond to the text of Nasreen’s Secret School by Jeanette Winter, a picture book about a school in Afghanistan. This book will set the stage for a discussion around the importance of education and what people can do to promote schooling for all around the world. Students plan and complete a service project to help expand access to education around the world.

Focus Question: What are the effects of educating every child in the world?

  1. Who Has Rights? Who Has Privileges?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Need
    SOC: Rights/Responsibilities; Wants/Needs
  2. Schools for Girls

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Donate; Empathy
    SOC: Civil Rights; Cultures; Global Issues; Nonprofit
  3. Should All Children Go to School?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection
    PHIL: Advocacy; Donate; Responsibility; Service
    SOC: Global Issues
3-5

Global Health: Hunger and Food Around the Globe (3-5)

Students will learn about the importance and privilege of making healthy and sustainable food choices. They will understand that many people in the world do not have the choice of what to eat due to food insecurity. They will brainstorm some ways that they can address local and global food insecurity and choose to take action.

  1. Making Healthy Eating Choices for You and Others

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Inferences/Generalizations; Reflection
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger
    SCI: Classify; Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Diverse Communities; Health and Disease
  2. Food Insecurity

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Resources
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Advocacy; Global Community; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Economics; Opportunity Cost; Scarcity
  3. Making a Difference in World Health

    ELA: Biography; Compare/Contrast; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Act of Kindness; Empathy; Giving; Global Community; Hunger; Need; Reflection; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Health and Disease; Maps/Globes; Nonprofit; Opportunity Cost; Scarcity
3-5

Good Citizenship and Philanthropy (4th Grade)

Students will explore ways in which working together is important in solving community problems.

  1. Good Citizenship and Philanthropy (4th Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Chronology; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Research; Response to Text/Others; Structural Patterns
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Need; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Adaptation; Cause/Effect; Chronology; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Cultures; Economics; Ecosystems; Land Use; Native Peoples; Natural Resources; Volunteerism
3-5

Great North (3-5)

  1. Great North (3-5)

    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Family; Traditions
    SCI: Climate; Common Good; Life Cycles; Nature; Weather
    SOC: Cultures; Diverse Communities; Diversity; Environment; Maps; Migration
3-5

Great Philanthropists in History—Charles Hackley

Learners will gain a deeper understanding of philanthropy by studying a great philanthropist from their community. Students will recognize the importance of philanthropy in the community and the importance of becoming involved.
  1. Charles Hackley—A Man with a Plan

    PHIL: Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Hackley, Charles; Historical Biographies; Inquiry
  2. Hackley's Contributions

    PHIL: Donate; Hackley, Charles; Philanthropist
    SOC: Historical Biographies; Maps
  3. Continuing the Tradition

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Community; Hackley, Charles; Philanthropist; Reflection; Service Plan
3-5

Grow Involved 3-5

Young people learn to grow involved in service by following the lead of service models and by taking action in a variety of projects. In this unit, they read about and get inspiration from the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. They get involved by growing flowers and sharing them with community members who will be cheered by the gifts. They make and donate book covers to a community organization. They also make and donate quilts that communicate messages of acceptance of differences.

This unit can be taught as grade specific using two lessons (Grade 4 - Lessons 1 & 2 , Grade 4 - Lessons 1 & 3, Grade 5 - Lessons 1 & 4). To extend the learning and service experiences, additional lesson can be used, as time allows.

  1. Growing Like Dr. King (Introduction Grade 3-5)

    ELA: Biography; Non-Fiction Literature; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Time/Takent/Treasure
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther
  2. Good to Grow (Grade 3)

    ELA: Character Development; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Plants
  3. Books Matter! (Grade 4)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Librarian of Basra (The); Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Reading; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Community; Contribute; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities; Developing Countries; Maps/Globes
  4. Tolerance Quilt (Grade 5)

    ELA: Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Historical Fiction
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Discrimination; Leadership; Sacrifice
    SOC: Civil Rights; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877)
3-5

Harvesting Friends-Feeding Needs (4th Grade)

This lesson will give students background knowledge of the needs of their community. After completing this lesson, students will recognize the effect that individuals can create through developing philanthropic actions for the common good.
  1. Harvesting Friends-Feeding Needs (4th Grade)

    ELA: Listening; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Giving; Good Character; Personal Virtue
3-5

Healthy Youth, Healthy Community (3-5)

The purpose of this Unit is to introduce the learners to healthy living habits both for themselves as well as their community. The learners demonstrate their knowledge by participating in various activities making healthy food and exercise choices and helping people of the community do the same. Learners develop a service-learning project based on a community needs assessment. They reflect on their service project, demonstrate the impact on the community, and celebrate their hard work and success. Focus Question: Why is it important to practice healthy living  habits and advocate for healthy living practices in a community?
  1. Building Health

    ELA: Journaling
    PHIL: Community; Reflection; Respect; Responsibility
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  2. Healthy Culture

    ART: Dance; Music
    ELA: Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Social/Cultural Issues; Summarzing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Family; Needs Assessment
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  3. Media and Body Image

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Needs Assessment
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  4. Responsibility and Citizenship

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Social/Cultural Issues; Summarzing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Leadership; Reflection; Responsibility; Volunteer
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Health and Disease; Healthy Community; Research
  5. Is My Community Healthy?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Summarzing/Paraphrasing; Survey; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Volunteer
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  6. Designing a Community Health Project

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Summarzing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Reflection; Responsibility; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
3-5

Helping Hands Across the World (5th Grade)

  1. Helping Hands Across the World (5th Grade)

    ELA: Give a Goat; Group Discussions; Listening; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue
3-5

Heroes and Their Impact

Using three very different persons as examples, students will see how a single person with personal virtue, good character, and ethical behavior can make a big difference in the world. Students will identify how heroes have acted for the common good. Students will design their own service project. While written for a Catholic Elementary School, the lessons in this unit may be easily adapted for public school use.
  1. Jackie Robinson, A Black Hero

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Writing Process
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Courage; Philanthropic Act; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 2 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Robinson, Jackie
  2. Mother Teresa

    ELA: Biography; Response to Text/Others; Writing Process
    PHIL: Heroes
    SOC: 1 genOn; Common Good; Cultures; Good Character; Mother Teresa; Personal Virtue
  3. Rosa Parks

    ELA: Biography; Letter Writing; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Community; Enlightened Self-Interest; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Social Action
    SOC: 1 genOn; Community; Cultures; Discrimination; Historical Biographies; Parks, Rosa; Rights/Responsibilities
3-5

How Did We Help?

This unit will introduce early philanthropic behavior in the United States. Lesson One: Native Americans and Giving uses literature to relate the contributions of a native American to the stewardship of the land. Lesson Two: The Mayflower Compact Started It shows how the Mayflower Compact prepared the Pilgrims to act for the common good. Lesson Three: The "Society of Friends" and Society analyzes the work and beliefs of members of the Society of Friends as it affected the common good and reflected Core Democratic Values. Lesson Four: Benjamin Franklin and Life uses the actions and writings of Benjamin Franklin to show how the common good and the independent sector was furthered in the early days of this country.
  1. Native Americans and Giving

    ELA: Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Native Americans; Stewardship
    SOC: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky: A Message from Chief Seattle; 1 genOn; Environment; Pollution
  2. Mayflower Compact Started It (The)

    PHIL: Common Good
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civil Society; Mayflower Compact
  3. "Society of Friends" and Society (The )

    PHIL: Common Good; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; Democratic Values; Inquiry; Quakers; Research
  4. Benjamin Franklin and Life

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Poor Richard’s Almanack
    PHIL: Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: Franklin, Benjamin; 1 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources
3-5

Inquiring Minds: News and Philanthropy

The purpose of this unit is to learn about the structure of the newspaper and identify acts of philanthropy and kindness in the news. Students will recognize the many acts of philanthropy in the communities to which they belong.

Focus Question: What is the role of philanthropy in my communities?

  1. What's the News?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Informational Genre; Informational Media; Journaling; Main Idea; Reading; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Common Good; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 8 genOn; Current Events; Timelines
  2. Turning Literature into News

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Brainstorming; Informational Media; Interview; Media Characteristics; Response to Text/Others; Writing Process
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Common Good; Philanthropic Literature; Volunteer
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Current Events
  3. Philanthropy News

    ELA: Brainstorming; Expository Writing; Interview; Peer Review; Research; Teamwork; Writing Process
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Common Good; Community; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Community; Cooperative Groups; Current Events; Good Character; Inquiry
3-5

Investing In Others (3-5)

Students explore the ways people around the world earn and spend money. They brainstorm possible careers and graph their personal interests on a class graph. They learn four choices they can make with money and compare this to how they spend their time. They recognize that volunteering requires freedom of choice. The students compare how they spend their time to how Alexander from Alexander Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday spent his money. They discuss positive incentives for donating money and make a plan.

  1. Paths to Different Jobs

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Letter Writing
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Civil Society; Global Community
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Cultures; Currency; Global Issues; Nonprofit
  2. How Do You Spend Your Time?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Time
    PHIL: Contribute; Families; Responsibility
    SOC: Freedom
  3. Alexander Used to Be Rich

    ELA: Group Discussions; Questioning; Reading; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Donate; Service
    SOC: Community; Economics; Family; Opportunity Cost
3-5

It's All in the Cards

While this unit introduces the basic vocabulary of the game Mini Bridge, it also uses the language of game playing and Mini Bridge to discuss social skills and teamwork. Learners discuss the importance of rules and etiquette in games, as well as in the "game of life." Students learn game procedures, playing-card attributes, math skills, and communication skills while having fun with games and teaching others to play. The final three lessons teach the game of Mini Bridge and give specific strategies for using critical thinking in the game. For classrooms ready to move to Bridge, the link to Bridge lessons is provided at the end of the final Mini Bridge lesson.
Focus Question: How do rules help us do well in games and in life?

  1. Why Games Have Rules

    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Location; Rules
  2. Getting to Know The Cards

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Rules
  3. Let's Play Cards!

    ELA: Vocabulary
    MAT: Addition; Comparing Numbers
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Civil Society; Cooperate; Courtesy; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Respect; Rules
  4. Games, Rules

    ELA: Communicate; Retelling; Speaking; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; Courtesy; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Respect; Rules; Service Project
    SOC: Good Character
  5. Crossing the Mini Bridge

    ELA: Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Mental Computation; Probability; Reasoning
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; Courtesy; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Respect; Rules
    SOC: Good Character; Location
  6. Thinking about Mini Bridge

    ELA: Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Numeral Patterns; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  7. Mini Bridge Lessons

    ELA: Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Numeral Patterns; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
3-5

I've Been Writing In The Classroom

Students will go through the complete writing process from writing rough drafts to editing and illustrating their stories. The stories will be turned into booklets which will be given to children who are ill, so they can read or hear them during their recovery. The learners will reflect on the value of their contributions.
  1. We're Off To Do Some Giving,
    Some Wonderful Giving To Others

    ELA: Brainstorming; Writing Process
    PHIL: Giving; Volunteer
  2. Topics and Ideas—Sort and Seize

    ELA: Audience; Peer Review; Voice; Writing Process
    PHIL: Need; Service Project
  3. Help! I Need Some Editing

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Audience; Peer Review; Voice; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Need; Service Project
  4. We Hope This Helps

    ELA: Peer Review; Reflection
    PHIL: Benefits; Community; Service Project
3-5

Just What Is a YAC (Youth Advisory Committee)?

The unit will introduce students to the idea of helping others through a series of read-a-loud books, leading to the understanding that they can also be philanthropic. (They have time, treasures and/or talents to share.) The class will develop a list of possible service projects. They will listen and respond to a presentation given by a member of a Community Foundation Youth Advisory Committee. They will write a mini-grant proposal to obtain funds for the service project, perform the service and evaluate its effects on the community and themselves.
  1. Look at Philanthropy in Children's Literature (A)

    ELA: Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge; Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Selflessness; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Community; Core Democratic Values; Cultures; Respect
  2. What Can We Do to Help Others?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Teamwork; Universal Themes; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community Foundation; Service Plan; Youth Advisory Committee
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Decision Making Model; Inquiry
  3. Meeting a Member of a Youth Advisory Committee

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Teamwork
    PHIL: Unity Foundation; Youth Advisory Committee
    SOC: Decision Making Model; Inquiry
  4. Writing A Grant

    ELA: Expository Writing; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Community; Grantmaking; Youth Advisory Committee
    SOC: Decision Making Model
  5. Evaluating Our Success

    ELA: Personal Response; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Point of View
3-5

Keeping Our Pets Safe in an Emergency

No one wants to think about disasters and evacuation. These are frightening issues for adults, and are especially scary for children. Advanced planning, including preparing for the care of animals, can minimize some of the fright and stress of evacuation.  Preparing for a disaster is the first and best step in helping both people and animals in case of an emergency. Animals are part of our families and we want to make sure that they are safe just like we are. (ASPCA®) 

This unit is designed to help learners understand what is needed to be prepared for an emergency.  Through a better understanding of disasters and emergencies, and researching animal welfare needs in the community, the learners will understand the need for emergency preparedness including for animals.  They create a service learning project involving animal welfare and also share their knowledge with their peers. 
Focus Question:
How can I make a difference in the lives of animals and their welfare in our community?
 

  1. Where Is Everyone Going?

    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Emergency Response; Environmental Stewardship
    SCI: Natural Disaster; Weather
    SOC: Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural
  2. What Is Our Plan?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Visual Media
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard: Emergency Prepardness
    SCI: Natural Disaster
    SOC: Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural
  3. What Would We Do?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard: Emergency Prepardness; Service Project; Sharing
    SCI: Natural Disaster; Weather
    SOC: Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural
3-5

Kids Can Make a Difference

This unit brings students together with other students who live in a very different community to do something for the common good. In this Unit the students develop a pen-pal relationship with a classroom in a community that is supposedly very different from their own. As they communicate about their community, interests and other issues, they learn that they have much in common. The two groups work cooperatively to collect canned goods for their local communities. Then they each plan and implement a service-learning project. The students reflect on the role of the long distance and communication through writing on the success of their project.
  1. Do It Write

    ELA: Town Mouse Country Mouse; Letter Writing; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Listening; Respect; Sensitivity
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; Resources
  2. Cans Make a Difference

    ELA: Letter Writing; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Service Learning; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Good Character; Problem Solving; Research
  3. Long-Distance Service

    ELA: Creative Writing; Letter Writing
    PHIL: Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Communities; Good Character; Nonprofit Organizations
3-5

Laws, What Are They Good For?

Learners will discover how their communities work. They will be introduced to theories of governance, learn how governments are organized, how they make laws and what their rights and responsibilities are as citizens of their school and community at large. Through a service-learning activity, learners will share what they have learned about rights and responsibilities with others in their school and community.
  1. We Are a Comm-un-it-y.
    I've Got All My Classmates with Me-Part I

    ELA: Brainstorming; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Cooperate
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Laws; Rules
  2. We Are a Comm-un-it-y.
    I've Got All My Classmates with Me-Part II

    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Community; Conflict Resolution
    SOC: Democracy; Government; Laws; Rules
  3. Just a Spoonful of Rights Makes the Responsibility Go 'Round-Part I

    ELA: Group Discussions; Role-Play; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Justice
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Constitution of the United States; Core Democratic Values; Ethics; Human Rights; Rights/Responsibilities
  4. Just a Spoonful of Rights Makes the Responsibilities Go 'Round-Part II: Service

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Communicate; Media Genres; Role-Play
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Rights/Responsibilities
3-5

Learning About Philanthropy-Diocesan Standard

Students will identify philanthropy in their daily lives and will recognize time, talent, and treasure as components of stewardship and philanthropy.
  1. Love of Mankind

    PHIL: Christianity; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Parochial
  2. Call to Care (A)

    ELA: Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Christianity; Stewardship
    SOC: Parochial
  3. Time, Talent, and Treasure

    ELA: Survey; Universal Themes; Writing Process
    PHIL: Christianity; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Parochial
3-5

Lewis and Clark: Great Journey West (3-5)

  1. Lewis and Clark: Great Journey West (3-5)

    ELA: Journaling; Reading; Research; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Native Americans; Philanthropist; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Cultures; Expansion (1801-1861); Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue
3-5

Living History-An Intergenerational Philanthropy
Project

Students will develop sharing and learning relationships with senior friends from a local senior center or retirement home as they volunteer to write the Living History of that person. They will seek to discover what brought that person and his/her family to the area of the state. They will compare and contrast the life of their senior with their own. Both generations will discuss how they have been philanthropists in their lives. They will write, illustrate and publish their books using timelines, English Language Arts skills, art and technology. A copy of this book will be given to their senior friend.
  1. Building Sensitivity and Awareness

    ELA: Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 genOn; 5 genOn; Selflessness; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Community; Core Democratic Values; Cultures; Respect
  2. Autobiography and Interviews

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Me and My Family Tree; Who’s Who in My Family; Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Autobiography; Interview; Journaling; Listening; Peer Review; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Speaking; Universal Themes; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Cooperate; Family; Sensitivity; Service Project
    SOC: Chronology; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Family; Historical Biographies; Opportunity Costs; Timelines; Volunteerism
  3. Sharing Our Past

    ELA: Listening; Reflection; Speaking; Writing Process
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Sensitivity; Service Project
    SOC: 6 genOn; Chronology; Common Good; Family; Immigration; Mobility; Opportunity Costs; Primary/Secondary Sources; Scarcity; Supply/Demand; Timelines; Volunteerism
  4. Publishing the Living History

    ART: Visual Arts: Perform
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Biography; Interview; Listening; Poetry; Speaking; Voice; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Service Project
    SOC: Chronology; Historical Biographies; Timelines; Volunteerism
  5. Celebration of Living History

    ELA: Biography; Listening; Speaking; Voice
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Reflection; Service Project; Social Capital
    SOC: Common Good; Primary/Secondary Sources; Volunteerism
3-5

Looking beyond First Impressions (5th Grade)

  1. Looking Beyond First Impressions (5th Grade)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Perception; Questioning; Stereotyping/Bias; Understanding/Interpretation; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Friendship; Justice; Respect; Stereotypes; Tolerance; Trust
    SOC: Diversity; Equality
3-5

Lucky Money: Penny Drive

This lesson will introduce learners to opportunities to respond to the needs of a community. The lesson will introduce vocabulary terms spend, save and donate. It is designed to help learners become more aware of the process involved in establishing a volunteer/service project. The students will learn or review the definition of philanthropy as well as explore reasons why people choose to donate.
  1. Lucky Money: Penny Drive

    ELA: Listening; Literature; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Counting; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
3-5

Makes Cents to Me: Penny Drive

This lesson will introduce learners to the concept that nonprofit organizations need monetary resources in order help others. It will help students explore why people, including themselves, might donate money to these organizations.

  1. Makes Cents to Me: Penny Drive

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
3-5

Making a Difference in Our Community (3rd Grade)

Students will identify some community and school needs.  They will respond to literature about being a good person and making a difference. Working as a group, the students select a philanthropic project, formulate a plan, and execute that plan to address the need.

  1. Making a Difference in Our Community (3rd Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; Common Good; Community; Need; Neighborhood; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Communities
3-5

Money Smart Children (3-5)

In this unit, the students learn the meaning of the words spend, save, invest, and donate. They collect money to donate and use an economic decision-making model to choose the recipient. Students begin to understand the importance of budgeting and create a personal budget. Younger students practice their skills in identifying and counting coins, while older students gain experience with data tables and bar graphs.
  1. Spend, Save, Invest, or Donate (3-5)

    ELA: Sam and the Lucky Money; Listening; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Decimals; Percent; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Personal Giving Plan; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Benefits; Common Good; Consumers; Costs; Economics; Investment; Natural Resources; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Scarcity; Spending; Taxation; Wants/Needs
  2. Thinking About Money (3-5)

    ELA: Alexander Who Used To Be Rich Last Sunday; Chair For My Mother (A); Fiction Literature; Personal Response; Point of View; Response to Text/Others; Retelling
    PHIL: Charity; Common Good; Donate; Fundraising
    SOC: Budget; Consumers; Economics; Family; Goods and Services; Incentives; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity; Spending; Taxation; Wants/Needs
  3. Making Good Money Choices (3-5)

    ELA: Questioning; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Donate; Fundraising; Need; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs; Resources
  4. Count On It! (3-5)

    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Money; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Cooperate; Fundraising; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Currency; Goods and Services
  5. My Bank, My Budget, My Decisions! (3-5)

    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Personal Giving Plan; Personal Wealth; Service Project
    SOC: Budget; Economics; Income; Investment; Resources; Spending
3-5

Mother Earth Connections (3rd Grade)

The purpose of this lesson is for students to explore the concept of the earth. They will explore our connection to the earth and the importance of good stewardship of it through the Native American traditional beliefs about “Mother Earth.”

  1. Mother Earth Connections (3rd)

    ART: Music: Interdisciplinary; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Environmental Stewardship; Native Americans; Responsibility; Stewardship; Traditions
    SCI: Environment; Nature
    SOC: Cultures; Ecosystems; Environment; Ethics; Good Character; Native Peoples; Opportunity Costs; Personal Virtue; Scarcity
3-5

My Healthy Plate

This unit provides children with the tools necessary to understand the types of foods they should be eating on a daily basis to be healthy and ready to learn. Students learn about childhood hunger in their region. They learn the difference between companies that are for profit and nonprofit and the types of work they do. Students volunteer their time to prepare or pack meals for a local food distribution charity. 

Focus Questions: What are some ways to make changes in our diet so we make healthy choices that help us focus and feel healthy?

  1. Discovering Childhood Hunger

    ELA: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas; Non-Fiction Literature; Reading Literature; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Community; Hunger; Need; Philanthropic Literature
    SOC: Common Good; For-Profit; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  2. My Kids Food Basket Plate

    MAT: Classifying; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Number System; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Fundraising; Hunger; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Reflection
    SCI: Nutrition
3-5

My Water, Your Water, Our Water

Our Great Lakes Basin provides a wealth of material to develop the five themes of geography and instill the virtues of philanthropy and environmental stewardship. Learners will read and explore how our waterways became polluted. They will participate in meaningful activities to test water using the scientific method. Learners will discover individual and collective responsibility to maintaining the health of the Great Lakes Basin. They  will demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the importance of the Great Lakes, their respective ecosystems, and citizen responsibility to protect the waterways. Learners will understand the interrelationships of all stakeholders: individuals, businesses, industry, government and the third sector as stewards of the Great Lakes Basin.

  1. These Lakes Are Great

    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Ecosystems; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community Capital; Diversity; Environment; Ethics; Geography; Natural Resources
  2. Great Lakes at Stake

    ELA: Expository Text; Research
    PHIL: Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SCI: Natural Resources; Pollution; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Adaptation; Common Good; Ecosystems; Geography; Industrialization (1800-1900); Inquiry; Natural Resources; Urbanization
  3. Responsible Stewardship: The Saving of the Great Lakes

    ELA: Letter Writing; Persuasive Techniques; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Advocacy; Commons; Foundations; Service Project; Stewardship
    SCI: Data Collection/Organization; Environment; Experiment; Natural World; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Ecosystems; Ethics; Government; Inquiry; Natural Resources; Nonprofit; Pollution; Public Policy
3-5

Mystery of the Maya (3-5)

  1. Mystery of the Maya (3-5)

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Genre; Group Discussions; Primary/Secondary Sources; Story Elements; Understanding/Interpretation; Writing Process
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Cultures; Ethics; Native Peoples
3-5

Native American Legend about Community (A) (3rd Grade)

To review the idea of philanthropy and community through a Native American legend in which people take action in response to a community need.

  1. Native American Legend about Community (A)
    (3rd Grade)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Legend; Literary Forms/Genre; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Native Americans; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Traditions; Responsibility
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Communities; Opportunity Costs; Wants/Needs
3-5

Nature and You (Stewardship) (Private-Religious)

Using Biblical texts as their basis, students will explore a Jewish perspective on the relationship between humans and their environment. They will begin by studying and modeling Adam’s role of caretaker in the Garden of Eden. They will then focus more specifically on man’s relationships with animals and various natural resources. This unit demonstrates to students that environmental concern is inherent to the Jewish value system. It encourages students to play an active role in protecting their environment from harm.

Focus Questions:
What is the relationship between man and all other living things?
What is a person’s responsibility toward the environment?
How can a person take an active role in protecting and improving the environment?
 

  1. Guardians of Eden (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Informational Genre; Narrative Writing
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Judaism; Stewardship
    SCI: Ecology; Environment; Garden; Land Management; Natural
    SOC: Parochial
  2. One of a Kind (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Journaling; Narrative Writing
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Judaism
    SCI: Land Management; Natural Resources
    SOC: Environment; Parochial
  3. Saving the Trees (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Giving Tree (The); Lorax (The); Narrative Writing
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Judaism; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Natural Resources
    SOC: Environment; Parochial
3-5

Newborn and Child Survival (3-5)

Students identify the mission of Save the Children and recognize the need for saving children around the world. They learn the role of the civil society sector and why people give time, talent, or treasure for the common good. They view resources about the health workers who are saving children's lives across the world, and students work in small groups to research and report on five featured countries. They learn that they can support these health workers by choosing a service project to take action for children's health.

Follow this link to the Middle School Save the Children Unit: Newborn and Child Survival

  1. Save the Children

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Save the Children; 5 genOn; Advocacy; Global Community; Helping; Philanthropic Act; Poverty; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Economics; Family; For-Profit; Government; Nonprofit
  2. See Where the Good Goes

    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions; Informational Media; Presentations; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Save the Children; 5 genOn; Contribute; Giving; Heroes; Humanitarian; Hunger; Poverty
    SOC: Common Good; Cultures; Geography; Health and Disease; Human Rights; Maps/Globes; Nonprofit; Research
  3. Taking Action to Save Children

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Group Discussions; Narrative Writing; Reading; Resources; Teamwork; Voice
    PHIL: Caps for Good; Save the Children; 5 genOn; Act of Kindness; Activism; Advocacy; Contribute; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service; Social Action; Volunteer
3-5

Nonprofits are Necessary (3-5)

The lessons in this unit are designed to help learners become more aware of how nonprofit organizations benefit communities, job opportunities within the nonprofit sector, and how nonprofit organizations outreach to countries beyond local communities.
  1. Nonprofits in Our Community (3-5)

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Communities; Inquiry
  2. What Would You Do Without Nonprofits? (3-5)

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Inquiry
  3. Who Works for Nonprofit Organizations? (3-5)

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Capital Equipment; Career Opportunities; Goods and Services; Human Capital; Inquiry; Natural Resources
  4. Helping Countries in Turmoil (3-5)

    PHIL: Advocacy
    SOC: Democracy; Global Issues; Inquiry; Maps/Globes; Nonprofit
3-5

Nonprofits in Our World and Community (3-5)

By means of research, personal interviews with nonprofit representatives, and classroom presentations, students will be introduced to the nonprofit sector allowing them to recognize the essential role this sector plays in their lives and opportunities for careers in the sector.
  1. Nonprofits? (3-5)

    SOC: Civil Society; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. What Does a Nonprofit Do, and for Whom? (3-5)

    SOC: 11 genOn; For-Profit; Guidestar.org; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Research
  3. Nonprofits in our Community and World (3-5)

    ELA: Career Opportunities; Interview; Questioning; Research
    SOC: 11 genOn; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  4. Day in the Life of a Nonprofit (A) (3-5)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Interview; Reflection
    SOC: 11 genOn; For-Profit; Nonprofit
3-5

Opening Our Hearts and Hands to Others (Tzedakah) (Private-Religious)

The unit demonstrates that  tzedakah (charity) is a fundamental concept in Judaism.  Students are engaged in acts of tzedakah (charity) for the good of the communities to which they belong.

Focus Questions:
What is tzedakah?
Why is tzedakah important for the giver and the receiver?
How can I be involved in tzedakah?

  1. Giving is Getting (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Charity; Judaism; Sharing
    SOC: Economics; Parochial
  2. Tzedakah Begins at Home (Private-Religious)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Mishenh Torah; Analyze/Interpret; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Charity; Judaism; Philanthropic Act; Selflessness
    SOC: Ethics; Good Character; Parochial
  3. A Community of Givers (Private-Religious)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Informational Media; Letter Writing; Presentations; Research; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Charity; Judaism; Service Project
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Nonprofit Organizations; Parochial; Research
3-5

Our Constitutional Connection

Students will understand the definition of philanthropy and recognize philanthropic activities within the home, school, community, state, and nation. They will become familiar with the roles and services provided by federal, state, and local governments. The role of the Constitution in enabling a healthy democracy and strong citizenship will be explored. Students will discuss the importance of electing officials who are trustworthy since, through their offices, they contribute to the common good.
  1. Photo of Philanthropy (A)

    ELA: Fiction Literature; Listening; Reading; Speaking; Vocabulary; Writing Process
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Common Good; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
  2. Are We the People?

    ELA: Listening; Visual Media; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Amendments to Constitution; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Constitution of the United States; Individual Rights; Voting
  3. To Vote or Not to Vote? That Is the Question!

    ELA: Listening; Visual Media
    PHIL: Common Good; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Amendments to Constitution; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Constitution of the United States; Individual Rights; Voting
3-5

Our Philanthropic Tradition:
Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (5th)

Students will understand the vocabulary of philanthropy and the importance of the tradition of philanthropy to the community and civil society. They will listen to and discuss a literature book about philanthropy in the African American community that will enhance the student’s understanding of the democratic tradition of philanthropy.

  1. Philanthro What?: Philanthropy Lesson (5th)

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Responsibility; Trust; Volunteer
    SOC: Community; Respect; Selflessness; Traditions
  2. Getting the Hang of Philanthropy:
    Philanthropy Lesson (5th)

    ELA: Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Literary Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Family; Giving; Respect; Responsibility; Traditions; Trust; Volunteer
    SOC: African American; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Democracy; Family; Slavery; Volunteerism
3-5

Partners for the Common Good (4th Grade)

The students will define the terms profit and non profit organizations.  They will identify the nonprofit organizations that exist within their community and create an information cube to share with their families to increase awareness of philanthropy within their own communities.

  1. Partners for the Common Good (4th Grade)

    ELA: Listening; Retelling
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Community; Non profit; Philanthropy; Profit; Selflessness
    SOC: Communities; Environment
3-5

Philanthropists in the Community (5th Grade)

Students will see the possibilities for philanthropy in the many communities that they belong to from local to national.  They will investigate some nationally recognized philanthropists and their contributions of time, talent, or treasure. 

  1. Philanthropists in the Community (5th Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Common Good; Community; Contribute; Global Community; Philanthropists; Philanthropy
    SOC: Common Good; Communities
3-5

Philanthropy and Football-United

Students will become familiar with the definition of philanthropy and see examples of it in the community, especially in connection with the United Way.
  1. Michigan's Legacy of Giving

    ELA: Universal Themes
    PHIL: Foundations; Grantmaking; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure; United Way
    SOC: Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue
3-5

Philanthropy and You

To introduce the meaning of philanthropy and point out places in history where philanthropic acts occurred. Students will reflect on their own acts of philanthropy and relate it to everyday situations.
  1. Introduction to Philanthropy—Recognizing Good Citizenship and Philanthropy in Our Community

    ELA: Brainstorming; Chronology; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Research; Response to Text/Others; Structural Patterns
    PHIL: Need; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Adaptation; Cause/Effect; Chronology; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Cultures; Economics; Ecosystems; Land Use; Native Peoples; Natural Resources; Volunteerism
  2. Introduction to Philanthropic Beliefs of Native Americans

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Research
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure; Traditions
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Inquiry; Native Peoples; Values
  3. Recognizing Philanthropy in a Legend and in Modern Society-Examples of Sharing as Told Through a Native American Legend

    ELA: Legend of the Bluebonnet (The); Analyze/Interpret; Inquiry; Legend; Literary Forms/Genre; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Native Americans; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Communities; Disaster: Natural; Opportunity Costs; Values; Wants/Needs
  4. Human Rights Throughout History—Philanthropy and History of Human Rights Activists

    ELA: Brainstorming; Media Genres; Reflection; Research; Technology; Universal Themes; Visual Media
    PHIL: Activism; Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Analyze/Interpret; Branches of Government; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Core Democratic Values; de Las Casas, Bartolome; Human Rights; Inquiry; Native Peoples
  5. Squanto Helps New Arrivals—Squanto and His Philanthropic Contributions

    ELA: Brainstorming; Poetry; Teamwork; Technology
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Native Americans; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure; Traditions
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Chronology; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Cultures; Ecosystems; Good Character; Massasoit; Native Peoples; Pilgrims; Squanto; Wampanoag
  6. Ben Franklin, The Good Citizen—Benjamin Franklin's Contributions to Philadelphia

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Cooperate; Philanthropic Act; Social Action; Volunteer
    SOC: Franklin, Benjamin; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Community Capital; Economics; Ethics; Historical Biographies; Nonprofit; Volunteerism
  7. I Do My Part

    ELA: Interview
    PHIL: Sensitivity; Service Learning
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Volunteerism
3-5

Philanthropy in History

Students will examine models of philanthropy in history and in modern day life.
  1. We the People Hall of Fame

    ELA: Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Constitution of the United States; Historical Biographies; Preamble; Revolution/Nationhood (1754-1820)
  2. "We the People" Libraries
    Benjamin Franklin to Andrew Carnegie

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Writing Process
    PHIL: Libraries; Service Project
    SOC: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Carnegie, Andrew; Franklin, Benjamin; 4 genOn; Historical Biographies
  3. Self-Sufficiency and the Community

    ELA: Oxcart Man (The); Compare/Contrast; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Habitat for Humanity
    SOC: Economics; Timelines
  4. Bucket Brigade

    PHIL: Need; Volunteer; Volunteer Fire Companies
    SOC: Problem Solving; Simulation
  5. Westward Movement

    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Need
    SOC: Our Journey West; Chronology; Maps; Timelines
3-5

Philanthropy in Literature

This unit progresses from cognitive exercise to affective behavior. Learners will examine models of philanthropy in literature, in history, and in modern day life. They will learn to recognize behaviors, demonstrating giving of time, treasure or talent using examples discovered through their reading in order to model it themselves.
  1. Definition of Terms

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Reflection; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry; Volunteerism
  2. Common Good

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Literary Devices; Literary Forms/Genre; Media Genres; Perception; Plot Development; Presentations; Reading; Research; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Theme
    NONE: Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    PHIL: Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Inquiry; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs
  3. Enhancing Our Understanding of The Common Good Through Literature

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Genre; Group Discussions; Literary Response; Media Genres; Perception; Reading; Reflection; Research; Resources; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: Common Good; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities; Compare/Contrast; Democracy; Wants/Needs
  4. Trilogy (The)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Fable; Genre; Group Discussions; Literary Response; Parable; Perception; Persuasive Techniques; Reading; Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Wants/Needs
  5. House of Dies Drear (The)

    ELA: House of Dies Drear (The); Group Discussions; Historical Fiction; Literary Response; Perception; Predicting; Questioning; Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Social Action; Volunteer
    SOC: 2 genOn; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Communities; Decision Making Model; Democratic Values; Personal Virtue; Underground Railroad; Wants/Needs
  6. Too Big a Task

    ELA: Analogy; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Predicting; Questioning; Reflection; Research; Retelling; Teamwork; Technology; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Cooperate
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Timelines
3-5

Philanthropy in Michigan—Civil War

The purpose of this unit is to help students gain deep understanding of the meaning of philanthropy, study some examples of philanthropic acts in history and in the present, and begin to consider the risks and benefits of becoming a philanthropist.
  1. What is Philanthropy?

    ELA: Reading; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer; Women
    SOC: Ethridge, Anne; Gentle Annie: The True Story of a Civil War Nurse; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Historical Biographies
  2. Forming Opinions

    ELA: Letter Writing; Perception; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Role-Play
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Justice
  3. Why Should I Do Philanthropy?

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Reflection
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Volunteer
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Inquiry
  4. Philanthropic Michiganians of the Civil War

    PHIL: Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Inquiry; Reflection; Research; Timelines
  5. Decision-Making—Who Was Right?

    ELA: Debate; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection
    PHIL: Advocacy; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Crosswhite Incident; Freedom; Government; Quakers; Underground Railroad
3-5

Philanthropy Is Everywhere

The purpose of this unit is to increase students' knowledge about various kinds of philanthropy, from individuals doing "random acts of kindness," to corporate philanthropy and careers in the nonprofit sector.
  1. Everyone Can Be a Philanthropist

    PHIL: Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Common Good
  2. Creating Volunteers

    PHIL: Volunteer
    SOC: Group Discussions; Opportunity Costs
  3. Philanthropy "Giants"

    PHIL: Corporate Philanthropy; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Community Capital; Inquiry
  4. Careers in Philanthropy

    SOC: Career Opportunities; Compare/Contrast; For-Profit; Nonprofit
3-5

Philanthropy Is Everywhere:
Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (3rd)

Students will be introduced to the definition of philanthropy and its importance to and effects on the community. The students will identify their classroom as a community and explore ways in which each individual can support their classroom community by doing philanthropic deeds. Students’ understanding of “community” will be enhanced as it relates to membership in a variety of communities in their school, neighborhood, and beyond.

  1. "Phil"-ing Good: Philanthropy Lesson (3rd)

    ELA: Communicate; Journaling; Literary Response
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Giving; Philanthropic Act; Social Capital; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Community Capital; Wants/Needs
  2. Everyone Can Be a Philanthropist:
    Philanthropy Lesson (3rd)

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Philanthropic Act; Respect; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good
  3. Individuals and Their Communities:
    Philanthropy Lesson (3rd)

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Commons; Community; Sharing; Trust
    SOC: Human Characteristics of Place
3-5

Philanthropy—Individuals and Their Surroundings

The purpose of this unit is to help students understand that each of them is an important and potentially influential member of American society.
  1. Individuals and Their Communities

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Commons; Community; Trust
    SOC: 10 genOn; Human Characteristics of Place
  2. Factions

    PHIL: Diversity; Factions; Minorities
    SOC: Freedom; Point of View; Racism; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. Whom Do You Trust?

    PHIL: Trust
    SOC: Community Capital
  4. "We, The People..."

    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Compare/Contrast; Constitution of the United States; Democracy; Preamble; Rights/Responsibilities; Simulation; Values; Voting
3-5

Philanthropy—A Day at the Beach

Students will act as philanthropists, using their time and effort to answer a call for help to protect the environment for the common good. Their activities will build an appreciation for Michigan's fragile dune habitats as one of our natural resources and raise an awareness of the need to preserve and protect these resources. They will call others to action as philanthropists in their persuasive essays. Students will develop a better appreciation that this is a philanthropic event that will benefit the human and wildlife community by cleaning up the beach. This project includes many cross-curriculum subjects, including reading, writing, math, science, social studies, as well as putting life skills into practice.

Although written using Michigan dunes as an example of natural resources, this unit can be easily adapted for cleanup at any local park or body of water.

  1. Why Should We Clean the Beach?

    ELA: Poetry
    PHIL: Commons; Environmental Stewardship; International Coastal Cleanup; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Nonprofit Sector; Selflessness; Service Project; Volunteer
    SCI: Ecosystems
    SOC: 4 genOn; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
  2. Preparation-The Right Way to Help
    and Forms for Poetic Reflection

    MAT: Classify
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; International Coastal Cleanup; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Volunteer
    SCI: Ecosystems
    SOC: 4 genOn
  3. Let's Clean the Beach!

    ELA: Poetry
    MAT: Classify; Estimation; Measurement
    PHIL: Cooperate; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: 4 genOn
  4. Philanthropy—Why Did We Do It?

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Cause/Effect; Journaling
    MAT: Estimation; Measurement
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Reflection
    SOC: 4 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Environment
  5. Advocacy: Going a Step Further—Convince Someone!

    ELA: Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
3-5

Philanthropy—The Big Picture

This unit will define philanthropy as it appears in the private and public sectors and investigate how individuals work in concert through business, government, and foundations. It will increase students' awareness that their voluntary contributions are essential to the wellbeing of society whether done through the family, school, or neighborhood.

  1. It Looks Like Philanthropy

    PHIL: Community; Family; Neighborhood; Time/Talent/Treasure; Trust
    SOC: Common Good; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Tug of Roles or Who is the Bigger Philanthropist?

    PHIL: Common Good; Self Interest; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Economics; Inquiry
  3. Dividing the Philanthropic Shares

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteer
    SOC: Helping Out Is Cool; Laura Smith Haviland; Maps
  4. Getting Involved—Increase the Feeling

    PHIL: Mission Statement; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 2 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry
3-5

Phil's Community Connections

Students research and respond in a variety of interactive situations to uncover the actions that produce and encourage participation in the greater society.

Focus Question: What past philanthropic actions by individuals and organizations influence youth to be part of the community?

  1. Puzzle of Philanthropy (The)

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection; Research; Resources
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Foundations; Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Economics; Good Character; Government; Nonprofit; Research
  2. Pathway to Philanthropy

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Journaling
    PHIL: Reflection; Service Plan; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Communities; Decision Making Model; Research; Resources
  3. Something Beautiful This Way Comes

    ELA: Something Beautiful; Brainstorming; Interview; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; Contribute; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Historical Biographies; Volunteerism
  4. Philanthropic Peacemakers

    ELA: Alfred Nobel: Inventive Thinker; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: Global Community; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropist
    SCI: Nobel Peace Prize; Historical Biographies; Research
    SOC: 10 genOn
3-5

Pitch In — A Philanthropic Puppet Project

Students will study philanthropists and environmentalists through literature and research on environmental issues. Students choose one environmental issue to research such as recycling, landfills, rainforests, acid rain, global warming, water pollution, air pollution and energy. Students’ research and responses to the issues are presented in a culminating puppet play. They will conduct research, write scripts, make puppets from recycled materials and perform plays for others in their community. By performing these puppet shows, students will become environmentalists and philanthropists themselves as they educate and motivate others on these issues. They will be asked to think about the link between philanthropy, their environment and active citizenship.

Focus Questions:

  • Do people have a responsibility to care for the environment?
  • Are you an environmentalist?
  • Are you a philanthropist?
  • How is being an environmentalist an act of philanthropy?
  1. Digging Up the Facts

    ELA: Informational Media; Research; Resources; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Activism; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Recycling; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources
    SOC: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources
  2. A-Scripting We Will Go

    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Character Development; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Story Elements; Story Mapping; Teamwork; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Recycling; Social Action; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources
    SOC: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources
  3. Garbage—A Puppet's Paradise

    ART-T: Theater: Perform
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Character Development; Presentations; Role-Play; Teamwork; Voice
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling
    SCI: Environment; Natural Resources
  4. Philanthropic Puppets on Parade

    ART: Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Gardener (The); Compare/Contrast; Expository Writing; Presentations; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Environment; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Recycling; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Environment; Natural Resources
    SOC: Common Good; Environment
3-5

Pollution Is Not a Solution (5th Grade)

  1. Pollution Is Not a Solution (5th Grade)

    ELA: Narrative Writing
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Need; Stewardship
    SCI: Natural Resources; Water
    SOC: Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Geography; Maps
3-5

Powerful Words Can Warm the Heart

The purpose of this lesson is to show that artists are a valuable part of a community and to explore how they contribute to the public good.

  1. Powerful Words Can Warm the Heart

    ELA: Group Discussions; Leo Lionni; Listening; Theme; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Economics; Resources; Wants/Needs
3-5

PULSE: A STOMP Odyssey (3-5)

  1. PULSE: A STOMP Odyssey (3-5)

    ART-M: Music: Perform
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Cultures
3-5

Raising Resources

The lessons in this unit are designed to help learners become more aware of the process involved in establishing a volunteer/service project. Learners will recognize a service project needs to have a service plan, budget, and funding.
  1. We Need More than Money

    PHIL: Fundraising; Need; Volunteer
    SOC: Opportunity Costs; Resources; Scarcity
  2. Plan of Action

    PHIL: Fundraising; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: Problem Solving
  3. How Much Will This Cost?

    PHIL: Fundraising; Service Plan
    SOC: Budget; Choices/Consequences; Decision Making Model
  4. FUNdraising Goal

    PHIL: Fundraising; Service Project
    SOC: Problem Solving
  5. Nonprofits Compete

    PHIL: Fundraising; Need; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Decision Making Model; Problem Solving
3-5

Real Heroes

To examine traditions of philanthropy-giving and sharing of time talent, and treasure for the common good, as a bridge between community need and private action.
  1. My Community—My World

    PHIL: Need; Service Plan; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Helping Out Is Cool; Civic Responsibility/Virtue
  2. Traditions of Tribal Sharing

    PHIL: Native Americans
    SOC: Good Character; Personal Virtue
  3. First Conservationists (The)

    PHIL: Stewardship
    SOC: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky: A Message from Chief Seattle; Cultures; Environment; Interdependence; Muir, John
  4. Heroes and Celebrities

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Character; Charity; Heroes; Volunteer
    SOC: Inquiry
  5. Early Settlers of a Community

    PHIL: Community; Need
    SOC: Compare/Contrast
  6. Hiawatha, the Great Peacemaker

    PHIL: Community; Heroes; Problem Solving; Volunteer
    SOC: Hiawatha; Inquiry; Natural Resources
  7. Everyone Can Be a Real Hero

    PHIL: Service Project
    SOC: 4 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue
3-5

Refugees: Finding a Place

Students will make connections between themselves and refugees. They will learn and understand what it means to be a refugee. Students will gain an understanding of the similarities they share with refugees and how refugees are the same as everyone else except for the loss of their country, home and possessions. During this unit students will complete lessons to help them to empathize with refugees who are in various unfortunate situations. Students will learn how refugees face feelings of loneliness and rejection when displaced, and they will develop a personal understanding of what they can do to help. They will come to consensus on a decision to provide a service to benefit refugees or others in need and plan and implement a student-driven service project.

Focus Question(s): What factors contribute to people fleeing their home and becoming refugees? How does the plight of refugees affect all global citizens? What is our responsibility to address the issue of refugees?

  1. Leaving Home: Carly

    ELA: Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Viewing; Vocabulary
    SOC: 6 genOn; Developing Countries; Refugees
  2. Turned Away: How Does It Feel?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Inferences/Generalizations; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Empathy; Philanthropist
    SOC: 6 genOn; Developing Countries; Refugees
  3. Remembering A Time: Part of a Group

    ELA: Narrative Writing; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Nonprofit
    SOC: 6 genOn; Refugees
  4. Refugee Needs and Wants

    ELA: Compare/Contrast
    PHIL: Wants/Needs
    SOC: 6 genOn; Refugees; Wants/Needs
  5. What Will You Need?

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Enlightened Self-Interest; Giving
    SOC: 6 genOn; Climate; Disaster: Human-Made; Geography; Maps/Globes; Research; Simulation; Wants/Needs
  6. Carly and Me

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Expository Writing; Peer Review
    PHIL: Service; Volunteer
    SOC: 6 genOn; Common Good; Refugees
3-5

Rivers for the Common Good

This cross-disciplinary unit helps learners discover why it is necessary to keep our waterways and rivers clean. Philanthropy combined with strong content in Social Studies, Language Arts, Math and Science leads learners to conclude that keeping their water supply clean is everyone's responsibility for the common good . Learners practice core democratic values, explore literature through the book A River Ran Wild, follow the path of pollution in a river, focus on the concept of one million, and use the scientific method to examine the water cycle. They apply their learning toward taking action to address the issue of water pollution.
 

  1. River and Us (A)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Volunteer
    SOC: 4 genOn; Cause/Effect; Economics; Natural Resources; Pollution
  2. River through Time (A)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SOC: Chronology; Environment; Native Peoples; Timelines
  3. What Does Waste Do to a River?

    MAT: Estimation; Numbers; Predict
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SOC: Pollution; Simulation
  4. Taking Care of the Water Cycle

    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Cycles; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Ecosystems; Natural Resources; Pollution; Public Policy
  5. Mock Trial, A Service Activity

    ELA: Lorax (The); Uncle Jed's Barbershop; Letter Writing; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Reflection; Service Project
    SOC: Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Rights/Responsibilities; Simulation
3-5

Roosevelt's Tree Army

Students will learn basic terms and vocabulary related to the Great Depression. After listening to A Year Down Yonder, by Richard Peck, students will understand how small acts of philanthropy were possible, even during these difficult times. They will learn about government philanthropy through the work of the C.C.C. and the W.P.A. during the Great Depression. As a final project, the students will plant some tree seedlings in their community.

This unit focuses upon the volunteer efforts and revitalization of our country, which surfaced during the Great Depression under the leadership of Franklin D. Roosevelt, entitled the Civilian Conservation Corps.

  1. Year Down Yonder—Giving During the Depression (A)

    ELA: Year Down Yonder (A); Historical Fiction; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 4 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Civilian Conservation Corps; Common Good; Good Character; Great Depression; Personal Virtue; Works Progress Administration
  2. No Food, No Money, No Job—What to Do?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Questioning; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment; Plants
    SOC: Roosevelt, Franklin D; 4 genOn; Civilian Conservation Corps; Government; Great Depression
  3. Off to Camp We Go!

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Research; Teamwork
    MAT: Compare/Contrast; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Respect; Stewardship
    SOC: 4 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Civilian Conservation Corps; Government; Great Depression; Simulation
  4. Planting Trees

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection
    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Project
    SCI: Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Adaptation; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civilian Conservation Corps; Environment; Maps
3-5

Rosa Parks (5th Grade)

This lesson explores the heroic actions of one American woman--Rosa Parks. Students will learn about her refusal to give up her seat on a segregated bus and the resulting bus boycott that ended segregation on the Montgomery, Alabama city buses in 1956. Rosa Parks’ acts of philanthropy brought a community of people together for the common good and resulted in major social change in her community and in the nation. Students will identify the relationship of individual rights, justice, equality and community responsibility.

  1. Rosa Parks (5th Grade)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Community; Enlightened Self-Interest; Philanthropic Act; Social Action
    SOC: Communities; Cultures; Discrimination; Historical Biographies; Parks, Rosa; Rights/Responsibilities
3-5

Sand, Sand, Everywhere Sand

This unit is designed to enhance the learners’ knowledge of philanthropy through stewardship of the environment.  They will be introduced to the concept of stewardship and how that relates to taking care of the environment locally Learners will study desert regions around the world by using mapping and research skills to identify those deserts. They will also identify native plant and animal species of deserts. They will explore why it is important to be good stewards of the land both world wide and locally. The learners will demonstrate acts of philanthropy and environmental stewardship by cleaning or beautifying a public or common area around their school or in their community. 
Focus question:  Is it the civic responsibility of everyone to take care of public lands?
 

  1. Into the Desert

    ELA: Writing Process
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Desert; Ecology; Ecosystems; Heat; Plants
    SOC: Cultural Regions; Location; Major World Regions
  2. Where in the World is the Desert?

    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Adaptation
    SOC: Environment; Geography; Human Characteristics of Place; Natural Characteristics of Place
  3. People of the Desert

    ELA: Desert Scrapbook: Dawn to Dusk in the Sonoran Desert (A); Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Presentations; Teamwork
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Research
  4. Stewards of the Sand

    ELA: Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Listening; Presentations; Reflection; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Needs Assessment; Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Research
3-5

Sharing Is Giving (3rd Grade)

Students will explore the definition of “philanthropy,” “hero,” and “nonprofit” and how they apply to local community organizations and civic society.

  1. Sharing Is Giving (3rd Grade)

    ELA: Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen; Compare/Contrast; Reflection; Resources
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Motivation for Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Good Character
3-5

Sharing Our World

Students will gain an understanding of habitats, the coexistence of humans and wildlife, and the changes that have evolved over time. They will differentiate between various types of wildlife and explain the importance of protecting and nurturing the environment. They will select a service learning project in which they care for the animals around them.

Essential Questions:

  • Can humans and animals coexist in the same habitat?
  • If so, are there dangers that exist? For whom?
  • What is a community?
  • What do humans and wildlife share?
  • What is Common Good? Does it include wildlife?
  1. Exploring the Neighborhood - Literature Jigsaw

    ELA: Reading; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Common Good; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Sensitivity; Tolerance
    SCI: Environment; Habitat; Scientific Investigation
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Nature
  2. Habitats Past and Present

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Electronic Text; Informational Media; Research
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Community; Native Americans
    SCI: Ecosystems
    SOC: Communities; Compare/Contrast; Native Peoples; Research
  3. Cooperative Conjectures

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Communicate; Expository Text; Reflection
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Community; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Data Collection/Organization; Observation; Questioning
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Inquiry; Research
  4. Stop, Look and Listen

    ELA: Expository Text; Journaling
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Neighborhood; Sensitivity
    SCI: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Inquiry; Observation
    SOC: Communities; Ecosystems; Inquiry
  5. Lights, Camera, Action!

    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Peer Review; Presentations; Teamwork; Voice
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Common Good; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Sensitivity
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Ecosystems; Reasoning
    SOC: Adaptation; Communities; Historical Biographies; Interdependence
  6. Splish! Splash! Birdbath

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Reflection
    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Common Good; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Learning; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Ecosystems; Garden; Nature
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Economics; Environment; Opportunity Costs; Volunteerism
3-5

Singing a Song of Community

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the concept of serial reciprocity and to explore the contributions artists make to the common good.

  1. Singing a Song of Community

    ELA: When Marian Sang; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Research; Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Counting; Estimation
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Act of Kindness; Art from the Heart; Common Good; Serial Reciprocity; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
3-5

Small Actions with Big Results (5th Grade)

This lesson will expose learners to philanthropy in three different genres of literature: a play, a fable, and a parable. Through the genres the students will learn about community, helping others by addressing a need and philanthropic acts.

  1. Small Actions with Big Results (5th Grade)

    ELA: Fable; Genre; Group Discussions; Literary Response; Parable; Perception
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Respect; Responsibility; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Wants/Needs
3-5

Soup's On! Caring For Others in Our Community

Students will gain an understanding of philanthropy and form a connection within the community with a local nonprofit organization.  Students connect to the community through a field trip, map-making, and a fundraiser.  Students will donate their time, talent, and treasure to the local soup kitchen.
  1. It's Philanthropy

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Letter Writing; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Fundraising; Need; Nonprofit Organizations; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Communities
  2. Volunteering Our Time

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Journaling; Role-Play
    PHIL: Empathy; Fundraising; Nonprofit Organizations; Sensitivity; Service Learning; Volunteer
  3. A Mapping We Will Go

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Speaking
    PHIL: Community; Fundraising
    SOC: Maps/Globes; Natural Characteristics of Place
  4. Soup to Nuts

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Language/Style; Presentations; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Fundraising; Pro-Social Behavior; Sensitivity; Sharing
  5. Soup du Jour

    ELA: Expository Text; Journaling; Teamwork
    MAT: Fractions; Multiplication; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate; Fundraising; Volunteer
    SCI: Measure
  6. Bowl of Love

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Creative Writing; Teamwork; Writing Process
    PHIL: Fundraising; Service Project
    SOC: Contribute
3-5

Stewardship and the Rain Forest (4th Grade)

  1. Stewardship and the Rain Forest (4th Grade)

    ELA: Expository Writing; Non-Fiction Literature; Reading; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment; Nature
    SOC: Geography
3-5

Teaching Tolerance (Private-Religious)

This unit demonstrates to students the importance of being aware of the needs and opinions of others. It encourages students to think beyond themselves and to treat others with tolerance and respect.

This unit enables students to reflect on the following questions:

What does it mean to compromise?

What does it mean to be a good friend?

What does it mean to be tolerant of others?

  1. Love Your Neighbor: All the Rest is Commentary
    (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Interview; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Conflict Resolution; Friendship; Judaism; Reflection; Religious Perspectives; Respect; Tolerance
  2. The Making of a Good Friend (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Poetry; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Cooperate; Friendship; Judaism; Kindness; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Parochial
  3. Bringing Tolerance to Our Beaches (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Sneetches (The); Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Advocacy; Friendship; Judaism
    SOC: Discrimination; Parochial; Tolerance
3-5

The Heat Is On: A Unit Concerning Global Warming

Through the use of creative dramatics and the Internet, students will learn about global warming, its causes, effects, and possible solutions.  In the process they will conduct a “green audit” of their households and complete a project designed to teach others about global warming.

Focus Question:
What is a person’s responsibility for preserving and protecting the global environment?

  1. The Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Role-Play
    MAT: Identify/Articulate Problems; Infer; Picture Models
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Air; Diagram; Energy; Heat; Weather
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Climate; Common Good; Stewardship
  2. Causes, Effects, Solutions

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Reading; Teamwork
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Global Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Problem Solving
    SCI: Air; Conservation; Environment; Heat; Natural Disaster; Pollution; Rain Forest; Water
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Climate; Consumption; Environment; Industry; Natural Resources; Pollution
  3. Spread The Word

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate; Music: Perform
    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate; Theater: Perform
    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Letter Writing; Non-Fiction Literature; Point of View; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: Activism; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Responsibility
3-5

The Important Thing About Reading

This unit is designed to guide students in learning about the importance of reading, and to help them to plan and execute a book drive to help others gain access to books.  The students will reflect on the book drive after it is completed.

  1. The Important Thing about Reading Is ...

    ELA: Read n' Give; Brainstorming; Communicate; Group Discussions; Language/Style; Literary Response; Main Idea; Writing Process
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Book Drive; Caring/Sharing; Civil Society; Needs Assessment; Reflection
    SOC: Civil Society; Communities
  2. Read 'n' Give -- Planning Our Book Drive

    ELA: Read n' Give; Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Book Drive; Community; Donate; Need; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  3. Judging a Book by its Cover

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Read n' Give; Audience; Communicate; Creative Writing; Point of View; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Writing Process
    PHIL: Book Drive; Caring/Sharing; Community
  4. Read 'n' Give--Sharing Our Treasure

    ELA: Read n' Give; Communicate; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Book Drive; Caring/Sharing; Contribute; Donate; Friendship; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civil Society; Communities; Volunteerism
3-5

The Joy of a Garden (3rd Grade)

  1. The Joy of a Garden (3rd Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Listening
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Environment; Garden
3-5

This I Can Do (4th Grade)

Through literature this lesson will explore diverse communities united in working for the common good. It will demonstrate the importance of civic virtue and encourage students to think about the value of working together to solve community problems.

  1. This I Can Do (4th Grade)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Reading
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Giving; Need; Neighborhood; Respect; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Diversity
3-5

This I Can Do!

Everyone has special talents and abilities. We must seek to develop our own talents and use them to make a difference in our life and the lives of others. This unit will help students recognize talents and think of ways to use them to help others. They will also learn about homelessness from a homeless person ’s point of view.

  1. Talent

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: Christianity; Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Parochial
  2. Stewardship and the Rainforest

    ELA: Great Kapok Tree (The); Expository Writing; Non-Fiction Literature; Reading; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Christianity; Common Good; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment; Nature
    SOC: 4 genOn; Geography; Parochial
  3. Day in the Life of a Homeless Person (A)

    ELA: Fly Away Home; Sam and the Lucky Money; Expository Writing; Reading; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Christianity; Homelessness; Need; Neighborhood
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Parochial
  4. Why Volunteer?

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Chicken Soup for Little Souls; Expository Writing; Reading; Story Elements; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Christianity; Needs Assessment; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Economics; Nonprofit; Parochial; Scarcity
  5. Create a Volunteer Spirit

    ELA: Helping Out Is Cool; Constructing Meaning; Non-Fiction Literature; Reading; Research
    PHIL: Christianity; Common Good; Community; Need; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Parochial
3-5

Three 'Rs' to Environmental Stewardship (4th Grade)

  1. Three Rs of Environmental Stewardship:
    Earth Day (4th)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Literary Response
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Need; Recycling; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources; Nature; Pollution
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Core Democratic Values; Environment; Resources
3-5

Time, Talent, Treasure, and Economics

The students will determine if there is a need for quilts in the global community and compare three volunteer opportunities using a decision making model. They will participate in one of three global service learning projects while integrating economic concepts. Students will decide if they possess the time, talent, and treasure to help fill this need by volunteering for the chosen project and determine what their opportunity costs will be. In conclusion the students will reflect on their experience and write, illustrate, and publish individual books describing the volunteer opportunity while sharing their knowledge of philanthropic and economic concepts.
  1. Love Letters to the World

    PHIL: 1 genOn; 11 genOn; Community; Donate; Need; Service Plan
    SOC: 12 genOn; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs
  2. Resources and Trade Flow

    PHIL: 1 genOn; 11 genOn; Cooperate; Donate
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Capital Equipment; Consumers; Goods and Services; Human Capital; Maps; Marketplace; Natural Resources; Production/Producer; Trade
  3. Quilting Bee—Assembly Line Style

    ELA: Charlie Needs a Cloak
    PHIL: 1 genOn; 11 genOn; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Consumers; Production/Producer; Specialization
  4. Reflection and Assessment

    ELA: Narrative Writing; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 1 genOn; 11 genOn; Service Project
    SOC: 12 genOn; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs; Production/Producer; Trade
3-5

Traditions

Students will learn the vocabulary of philanthropy, use literature to discover acts of philanthropy in the making of quilts, and participate in their own quilting bee.
  1. Philanthro WHAT?

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Donate; Giving
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Community; Human Capital; Quilts; Respect; Selflessness; Traditions; Volunteerism
  2. Story Quilt Project

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Genre; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Listening; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Family; Time/Talent/Treasure; Traditions; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Conflict Resolution; Cultures; Quilts; Scarcity; Values; Volunteerism
  3. Quilts and Math

    ELA: Brainstorming; Genre; Group Discussions; Reading
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Patterns; Symmetry
    PHIL: Family; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Inquiry; Quilts; Traditions
  4. Purposeful Act of Kindness (A)

    ELA: Reading; Reflection
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Giving
    SOC: Community; Quilts; Traditions; Voting; Wants/Needs
3-5

Watershed S.O.S. (Saving Our Sources)

Watershed S.O.S. concerns gaining knowledge and discovering ways to protect the watershed. This unit includes lessons about the water cycle, how the watershed works, pollutants of the watershed, uses of water and water as a nonrenewable resource. The unit is interdisciplinary with science, English, social studies and philanthropic components.  Scientific experiments and demonstrations are included in the lessons. The unit lends itself to advocacy. Students would educate, take action through the political process by contacting local governmental agencies (DNR, contact state or U.S. Representatives, or write letters to the editor of a local newspaper concerning protecting their watershed. In order to be a good citizen, one must protect their environment and advocate for the protection of their watershed. This unit includes lessons about the importance of water, the watershed, water as a nonrenewable resource and ways that learners can be advocates and protectors of their watershed. The unit is interdisciplinary and has many hands on activities as well as experiments included in the lessons.

  1. Water Is Cool!

    ELA: Communicate; Listening
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Leadership; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Cycles; Environment; Evaporation; Matter; Natural Resources; Water
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Core Democratic Values
  2. What Is A Watershed?

    ELA: Communicate; Narrative Writing
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Models
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Helping; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Need; Stewardship
    SCI: Natural Resources; Water
    SOC: Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Geography; Maps
  3. Poseidon's Posse to the Rescue

    ELA: Communicate; Journaling; Letter Writing; Myths; Persuasive Techniques; Retelling
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Need; Stewardship
    SCI: Natural Resources; Water
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Natural Characteristics of Place; Resources
3-5

We the Community—Past, Present and Future

Students will gain an awareness and understanding of philanthropy and nonprofit organizations. They will create a book to be shared with the community that describes different people and organizations with the purpose of increasing civic virtue and philanthropy. The students will also reflect on their own past, present and future philanthropic acts.
  1. We the Past

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Research; Symbols/Images/Sounds; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Charity; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Maps; Resources; Timelines; Volunteerism
  2. We the Present

    ELA: Expository Writing; Interview; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Community Foundation; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Foundations; Good Character
  3. We the Community

    ELA: City Green; Author's Style/Purpose; Brainstorming; Writing Process
    PHIL: Charity; Helping; Philanthropic Act; Selflessness; Women; Youth Club
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Nonprofit Organizations
  4. My Promise

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Donate; Giving; Helping; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Technology
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Freedom; Timelines
3-5

We the Kids—The Three Branches and Me

In this unit, students learn about the U.S. Constitution and the roles of our three branches of government. Students look specifically at the structure and responsibilities of our judicial system while investigating responsibilities of living in a civil society. Through the use of cartooning as a media, students engage the public voice about political and social issues. The unit motivates individual students—via singing and dancing—in a performance of the Bill of Rights. The students identify the traits associated with Core Democratic Values and how these values are evident at home, school and in the community/nation.
  1. Building the Foundation

    ELA: We the Kids; Audience; Debate; Ethics; Fact/Opinion; Group Discussions; Historical Fiction; Listening; Nonverbal Communication; Reading; Speaking; Teamwork; Understanding/Interpretation; Viewpoint; Voice
    PHIL: 5 genOn; 9/11genOn; Civil Society; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; Cooperate; Core Democratic Values; Justice; Responsibility
    SOC: Branches of Government; Civil Society; Constitution of the United States; Ethics; Federal Courts; Preamble; Supreme Court
  2. No Joke—My Voice Counts!

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Cause/Effect; Creative Writing; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Influence; Social/Cultural Issues; Viewpoint; Voice
    PHIL: Activism; Civil Society; Common Good; Community; Empower; Pro-Social Behavior; Reflection
    SOC: Core Democratic Values; Freedom; Individual Rights; Public Policy; Social Action; Values
  3. Dancing and Singing through the Bill of Rights

    ART: Dance; Music
    ELA: Audience; Influence; Listening; Reading; Reflection; Writing
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Giving; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Civil Rights; Constitution of the United States; Cooperative Groups
  4. Kid-Friendly CDVs

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brainstorming; Creative Writing; Interpret; Interview; Listening; Questioning; Survey; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Honesty; Justice; Survey; Trust; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Cooperative Groups; Core Democratic Values; Diversity; Equality; Freedom; Justice; Liberty; Patriotism; Rule of Law
3-5

What a Wonderful World—Changes Through Time

The purpose of the lesson is to recognize that the community has changed over time and elderly people have seen some of these changes and can provide different perspectives.

Focus Questions: How has my community changed over time? What have the elderly people seen and done in my community? What great things are the babies of my community going to see and do?

  1. Joy of Friends (The)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Creative Writing; Interview; Presentations; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; Friendship; Philanthropic Act; Respect; Sensitivity
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Diversity; Human Characteristics of Place
  2. I Watch Babies Grow

    ART-M: Music: Analyze
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Chronology; Interview; Listening; Questioning; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Act of Kindness
    SOC: 10 genOn; Timelines
  3. What Building Used to Be There?

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Little House (The); Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Point of View; Research; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Activism; Community; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Chronology; Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; Research; Timelines
3-5

What Goes Around, Comes Around!

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the concept of serial reciprocity and to explore the contributions artists make for the common good.

  1. What Goes Around, Comes Around!

    ELA: Camille and the Sunflowers; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Research; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Act of Kindness; Art from the Heart; Common Good; Giving; Serial Reciprocity; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
3-5

What Is Philanthropy?

This unit introduce students to the term philanthropy through stories and role-playingStudents will experience philanthropy by packing and distributing goods at their community food pantry or donation center.  Is philanthropy a good thing for all?  

  1. Definition of Philanthropy

    ELA: Inferences/Generalizations; Journaling; Main Idea; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Selflessness; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
  2. Can You Make a Difference?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Journaling; Listening; Main Idea; Presentations; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
  3. Philanthropy Play

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Audience; Listening; Narrative Writing; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play
    PHIL: Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
  4. Service Learning Project

    ELA: Expository Writing; Reflection; Role-Play; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Benefits; Common Good; Contribute; Donate; Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Sensitivity; Service Learning; Time/Talent/Treasure
  5. What Does This Have To Do With Me?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Reflection; Understanding/Interpretation; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Community; Philanthropic Act; Sensitivity
3-5

What Respect Means to Me

The purpose of this unit is to guide learners to develop and practice positive character traits. This unit gives children the opportunity to discover and demonstrate respect for self, others, and the environment. The unit guides children to create good habits of respect, show acceptance for diversity, and learn positive self-talk. They define disrespect and teach others the consequences of bullying. The children have ownership in service projects, using real-life experiences to create change in the community, environment, and personal relationships. Throughout the unit, the children illustrate the application of respect through a service project, activities and extensions to core subjects.

  1. We Define Respect

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Prior Knowledge; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Respect
    SOC: Common Good
  2. Proud of Who I Am

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    MAT: Measurement
    PHIL: Respect
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
  3. Proud of My School

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Plot Development; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; Conflict Resolution; Need
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good
  4. Contagious Respect for Property

    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Service
    SCI: Compare/Contrast; Ecology; Observation
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; School Community
  5. This Is What We Mean

    ART: Music; Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Presentation
    PHIL: Community; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Respect; Service
3-5

What Will You Bring to the Table? (3-5)

In this lesson, students explore the issue of food insecurity in their community. Using the table as a theme, students design and carry out a service-learning project that addresses the issue of child hunger in the United States. They bring their time, talent, and treasure to the table.

Focus Question: What can we do to address the issue of child hunger in our community?

  1. What Can We Do about Hunger?

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas; Key Ideas and Details; Personal Response; Reading Literature
    MAT: Ratios/Proportions
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Community; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: 11 genon; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Distribution
3-5

Why Do People Give?

The purpose of this unit is for students to recognize the value of the arts and identify philanthropists who give time, talent or treasure to support the arts. Students also find ways to personally “give back” through small acts of kindness.
  1. Philanthropy — What Is It?

    ELA: Best Night Out with Dad; Brainstorming; Character Development; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good
  2. Artists Giving Back

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Camille and the Sunflowers; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Research; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Common Good; Serial Reciprocity; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good
  3. Celebrity Philanthropists

    ELA: Biography; Electronic Text; Presentations; Research; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Corporate Philanthropy; Foundations; Grantmaking; Motivation for Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Ethics; Historical Biographies
3-5

Words Can Hurt (4th Grade)

  1. Words Can Hurt (4th Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Non-Fiction Literature; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Understanding; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Discrimination; Friendship; Giving; Justice; Respect; Responsibility; Stereotypes; Tolerance; Trust
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Diversity; Equality; Rights/Responsibilities
3-5

Working Animals

This unit helps the learners understand that animals often work as a team with humans.  The students will learn about some extraordinary working animals and understand each individual’s responsibility to treat animals in a humane way. The students research a specific working animal and create an informational presentation about their findings. Learners will discover the impact that these animals have on the greater good.  The learners will consider the “payment” of humane treatment and respect and kindness due to animals. Students will learn that all animals deserve humane treatment and will determine their responsibility is to assist and support animal welfare.

  1. Introducing Working Animals

    ELA: Listening; Non-Fiction Literature; Response to Text/Others; Technology; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Community; Environmental Stewardship
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
  2. All In a Day's Work

    ELA: Anna & Natalie; Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Listening; Presentations; Research; Response to Text/Others; Speaking; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Environmental Stewardship
    SOC: Research; Timelines
  3. "Paying" the Animals

    ELA: Personal Response; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Environmental Stewardship; Reflection; Respect; Service Project
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
3-5

You Are Uniquely You

Through a variety of science activities and experiences with the arts, the students explore the concept that each person is unique and valuable. The students will work cooperatively and deliberately respect others and listen and accept the contributions of the others. Students use a decision-making model to come to a group consensus and perform a service for an audience. Students evaluate their service projects.

  1. Simply Unique

    ART: Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Non-Fiction Literature; Speaking; Story Elements; Teamwork; Writing Process
    MAT: Linear/Nonlinear Functions; Measurement; Metric/Customary Measure; Solving Problems
    PHIL: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Respect
    SCI: Compare/Contrast; Physical Science; Scientific Investigation; Simple Machines; Technology
  2. I Am a Star

    ART: Dance; Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Character Development; Persuasive Techniques; Reading; Teamwork; Voice; Writing Process
    PHIL: Respect; Service Project; Trust
    SOC: Good Character; Personal Virtue; Point of View
  3. Selfless Self-portraits

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Perception; Questioning; Reading; Research; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Motivation for Giving; Selflessness; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Gauguin, Paul; Van Gogh, Vincent; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Opportunity Cost; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Scarcity
  4. Deciding and Providing Service

    ART: Music: Perform; Theater: Perform; Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Listening; Presentations; Speaking; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Need; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Decision Making Model; Goods and Services; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity
  5. Reflecting and Sharing

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Letter Writing; Peer Review; Reflection; Writing Process
    PHIL: Reflection; Service Project
3-5
Unit Title & Purpose Lesson Titles & Key Words Grades

Advice and Consent

Students will recognize that even important people in the world do not have unlimited power. Constitutionally, the President of the United States is limited by the “advice and consent” rule, among others. The learners will look at the importance of limiting government and analyze the importance of citizen participation in their communities. How the common good benefits when citizens and students participate in their communities and schools will be identified. The role of nonprofits and foundations will be analyzed. Students will research the local community foundation, raise funds, learn parliamentary procedure, and form a Youth Advisory Committee which will complete grant applications and make recommendations to a Board of Directors for dispensing of the funds.

Focus Question: Why is it important for people to stay informed and participate in government processes? What are some ways to participate at the local level?

  1. Limits of Power

    ELA: Expository Writing; Point of View; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Branches of Government; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Constitution of the United States; Freedom; Limited Government; Rule of Law
  2. Who Should Do It?

    ELA: Presentations; Report; Synthesizing; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Foundations; Mission Statement; Need
    SOC: Economics; For-Profit; Foundations; Good Character; Goods and Services; Government; Nonprofit; Personal Virtue
  3. Community Foundations and Procedure

    ELA: Group Discussions; Technology
    PHIL: Foundations; Youth Advisory Committee
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Economics; Goods and Services; Nonprofit
  4. Youth Advisory Committee in Action

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Presentations; Role-Play
    PHIL: Board of Directors; Foundations; Fundraising; Needs Assessment; Nonprofit; Survey; Youth Advisory Committee
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Point of View; Volunteerism
6-8

Advisory—A Call to Action

Learners will research events in American history that led to the development of philanthropy in the United States, analyze the importance of allowing all citizens the opportunity to contribute to the common good, identify needs and resources to set up and maintain a service learning project.

  1. What Is Service Learning?

    ELA: Listening; Reflection; Speaking; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Common Good; Service Learning; Time/Talent/Treasure
  2. History of Philanthropy

    ELA: Presentations; Research; Speaking; Teamwork
    PHIL: Timelines
    SOC: Nonprofit; Timelines
  3. Advisory in Action

    ELA: Brainstorming; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; School Community
  4. Evaluation Is Reflection

    ELA: Reflection; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Reflection; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
6-8

Alternative Energy Sources

This unit shows learners how electricity is created, used, measured, and conserved. Learners explore energy conservation and energy efficiency using a lab activity about lightbulbs and a research assignment about alternative energy resources. Students plan and carry out a project to advocate for conserving energy and using green technology. They demonstrate to members of the school or local community their learning about renewable resources that promote conservation. The purpose of this unit is to empower learners to advocate for responsible use of energy resources. While this unit is written specifically to address the "greening of New Jersey," it is adaptable to any community.  

Focus Question: What is an individual's responsibility for the environment?

  1. Measuring Energy Use

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Electronic Text; Journaling; Listening; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Understanding/Interpretation; Viewpoint
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Interpret
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Problem Solving; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Data Collection/Organization; Electricity; Energy; Environment; Measure; Natural Resources
    SOC: Common Good; Consumers; Contemporary Issues; Economics; Environment; Family
  2. Investigating Lightbulbs

    ELA: Star-Ledger; Informational Media; Questioning
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Problem Solving; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Data Collection/Organization; Electricity; Energy; Measure; Observation
    SOC: Environment; Resources
  3. Energy Action Plan

    ELA: Star-Ledger; Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Compare/Contrast; Informational Media; Letter Writing; Research; Resources; Speaking; Teamwork; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Problem Solving; Service Plan; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Conservation; Natural Resources
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Economics; Resource Allocation; Simulation
6-8

Animals in Sports and Entertainment

The learners will assess the role of animals in sports and entertainment. The learners will differentiate between animal cruelty and the humane treatment of animals. They explore attitudes/beliefs about the role of animals specifically in sports and entertainment. The learners will then identify advocacy as a way to promote the humane treatment of all animals.

Focus Question: 
How should animals be treated and who speaks for their welfare?

  1. Those Amazing Animals

    PHIL: Animal Welfare; Empathy; Environmental Stewardship; Justice; Kindness; Reflection; Respect; Sensitivity; Values
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Influence; Journaling; Personal Response; Point of View; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Economics; Ideals/Reality; Laws; Natural Resources; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Caring for Those Amazing Animals

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Influence; Personal Response; Point of View; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Empathy; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Justice; Kindness; Mission Statement; Reflection; Respect; Sensitivity; Social Action; Values
    SCI: Animals; Cause/Effect; Ethics; Inquiry; Nature
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Economics; Ideals/Reality; Laws; Natural Resources; Nonprofit; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. What's Being Done?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Personal Response; Persuasive Writing; Point of View; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Service Project; Social Action; Values
    SCI: Animals; Cause/Effect; Ethics; Inquiry
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Consensus; Contemporary Issues; Laws
6-8

Are You a River Keeper?

Learners will utilize fundamental techniques to determine the health of a local river. They will collect, compile, display and interpret their data. The students will focus on how water speed affects rates of erosion and deposition. They will focus on the history of, reasons for, and possible solutions to excessive deposition in the southern branch of the Muskegon River or waterway in their community. Through the writing and performing of a short theatrical activity, learners will summarize articles they have read to increase environmental awareness. Learners will become aware of global issues of clean water scarcity. Learners will investigate the many causes of river water pollution and relate them to their sources. Students will then identify four sectors of society and how each can be an agent for change. They will locate and write letters to public service, nonprofit organizations in support of water clarity. After presenting their findings to peers, students will distribute a self-designed pledge, requesting households to commit to positive change.
  1. Healthy Water!?...

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Chemistry; Data Analysis/Probability; Invertebrates; Life Science; Measure; Populations; River; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Environment; Natural Characteristics of Place; Natural Resources
  2. Speedy Water and Sediments

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Variables
    PHIL: Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Nonprofit Sector; Stewardship
    SCI: Earth Changes; Erosion; Natural Resources; Scientific Investigation; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Cause/Effect; Environment; Volunteerism
  3. LITWIS, What Is It?

    ART-T: Theater: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Personal Response; Reading; Universal Themes; Writing Process
    PHIL: Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Cycles; Environment; Erosion; Habitat; Natural Resources; Scientific Investigation; Water; Weather
    SOC: 4 genOn; Ethics; Inquiry; Public Policy
  4. Stepping into the River—In Service to Our Rivers

    ELA: Report; Technology
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Conservation; Environment
    SOC: 4 genOn; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Economics; Government; Industrialization (1800-1900); Land Use; Laws; Natural Resources; Opportunity Costs; Preamble to the Constitution; Public Policy; Scarcity; Urbanization
6-8

Around the World

Using the themes and content of geography, learners examine and demonstrate knowledge of cultural elements and traditions of selected nations of the world and how they affect philanthropy and stewardship in world regions. Learners will use the five themes of geography to explore the political, geographic, economic and social aspects of continents and identified specific nations. Our learners will also discover newly emerging democracies' struggle with developing non-governmental institutions and organizations. They will gain an appreciation for the worldwide relief efforts as well as grassroots movements. As a service learning project they will develop a visual aid for younger learners for celebrating African-American History Month.

  1. Traditions—Our World and Philanthropy

    PHIL: Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 4 genOn; Cultures; Diversity; Geography; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Traditions
  2. Our Journey Begins Close to Home—The Americas

    ELA: Discovering the Inca Ice Maiden; Universal Themes
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Patterns
    PHIL: Altruism; Pro-Social Behavior; Stewardship
    SOC: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Cultures; Geography; Nonprofit; North America; South America
  3. Africa—The Great Southland

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Poetry; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Community; Service Learning; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure; Traditions
    SOC: 2 genOn; 4 genOn; 6 genOn; Africa; Community; Cultures; Geography; Inquiry; Maps; Nonprofit; Primary/Secondary Sources; Resources; Volunteerism
  4. Australia, Land of the Outback

    ELA: Inquiry; Non-Fiction Literature; Research; Survey; Universal Themes
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Patterns
    PHIL: Mission Statement; Stewardship
    SOC: 4 genOn; Australia; Cultures; Geography; Inquiry; Nonprofit
  5. Philanthropy in Europe

    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Pro-Social Behavior; Stewardship; Traditions
    SOC: 4 genOn; Cultures; Europe; Geography; Inquiry; Maps; Nonprofit
  6. Asian Fusion

    ELA: One Thousand Paper Cranes; Non-Fiction Literature; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Stewardship; Traditions
    SOC: 4 genOn; Asia; China; Cultures; Economics; Geography; Inquiry; Japan; Nonprofit
6-8

Art for the Common Good—Junkanoo!

The purpose of this unit is to encourage students to examine the way groups work together for the common good and understand how specific community factions preserve their culture through the arts. In a fun and creative activity, groups will consider how to be more effective in cooperative learning.
  1. Introduction to Junkanoo! A Bahamian Festival

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Electronic Text; Expository Writing; Group Discussions; Prior Knowledge; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Community; Community Capital; Factions; Human Rights; Rights/Responsibilities; Traditions; Trust
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Africa; Common Good; Community; Community Capital; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Discrimination; Environment; Factions; Inquiry; Junkanoo (Bahamian Festival); Migration; Minorities; Mobility; Pluralism; Populations; Primary/Secondary Sources; Racism; Research; Slavery; Tolerance; Traditions
  2. Group Headdresses

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Community Capital; Human Rights; Minorities
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community Capital; Factions; Junkanoo (Bahamian Festival); Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations
  3. Junkanoo Parade (A)

    PHIL: Service Learning
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Cultures
6-8

At the Core of Philanthropy—Democratic Values

This unit begins with the learner examining personal beliefs and the basis for their actions. This is the connection to understanding that the Core Democratic Values are fundamental civic beliefs which inspire philanthropic action. Students will develop descriptions and create posters of eight Core Democratic Values. They will also research contemporary examples of individuals acting to enhance Core Democratic Values. While reflecting upon the historical perspective and context of World War II, students will view a video as well as participate in role plays regarding the enhancement or violation of Core Democratic Values. Finally, students will use what they have learned about the Japanese Internment to examine Core Democratic Values during World War II as they compose and articulate their thoughts in an essay format.
  1. Seeds of Our Democracy—Core Values

    PHIL: Philanthropic Traditions; Reflection
    SOC: 1 genOn; Bill of Rights; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Constitution of the United States; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Democracy; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Separation of Powers; Values
  2. Planting the Seeds of Our Values—Contemporary Perspective

    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 1 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Inquiry; Research; Resources
  3. Planting the Seeds of Our Values—Historical Examples

    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Greatest Generation (The); 1 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Research; Resources; World War II
  4. Growing from Planted Seeds

    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 1 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Core Democratic Values; Diversity; Human Rights; Japanese Internment; Pearl Harbor; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Tolerance
6-8

Best Day Ever (The)! (8th Grade)

Students are asked to evaluate the use of their time, talent and treasure by choosing activities to fill a typical non-school day. They will be expected to take a look at the benefits and opportunity costs involved in sacrificing personal time for the common good of their community.

  1. Best Day Ever (The)! (8th Grade)

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Common Good; Sacrifice; Selflessness; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance
    SOC: Common Good; Individual Rights; Opportunity Costs
6-8

Bridges for All

This unit will assess the importance of volunteers, both today and in history. Students will research the work of volunteers before, during and after the Civil War and decide what they can do today to make a meaningful contribution in their community.
  1. Fighting Chance (1850-1877) (A)

    ELA: Personal Response; Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Courage; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Haviland, Laura Smith; Inquiry; Quakers; Underground Railroad
  2. Better Way (A)

    ELA: Reading; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteer
    SOC: Cooper Union; Edison, Thomas A.; Freedmen’s Bureau; George Peabody Institute; Knights of Pythias; Pinchback, P.B.S.; Soldier’s Ladies Aid (The); YMCA/YWCA; 10 genOn; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Discrimination; Good Character; Human Rights; Persecution; Personal Virtue
  3. Rallying to the Cause

    ELA: Personal Response; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: Anthony, Susan B.; Douglass, Frederick; Garrison, William Lloyd; Hayden, Lewis; Pinchback, P.B.S.; Tubman, Harriet; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Civil Society; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Discrimination; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Reconstruction; Rights/Responsibilities
6-8

Bridging the Gap

Students will gain an increased understanding and awareness of philanthropy as well as become involved in a philanthropic activity on a regular basis. While written for a Christian Middle School, the lessons may be easily adapted for public school use.
  1. Meaning of Philanthropy (The)

    ELA: Expository Writing; Reading; Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Christianity; Common Good; Family; Mission Statement; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Parochial
  2. Bridging the Gap by Doing Philanthropy

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Peer Review; Presentations; Reflection; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Christianity; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Parochial
  3. Philanthropy in A Christmas Carol

    ELA: Christmas Carol (A); Analyze/Interpret; Author's Style/Purpose; Biography; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Listening; Prior Knowledge; Reading; Symbols/Images/Sounds; Synthesizing; Theme; Universal Themes; Writing Process
    PHIL: Charity; Christianity; Common Good; Social Justice
    SOC: 10 genOn; 12 genOn; Parochial
  4. Philanthropy in Literature—Reading, Writing, Thinking

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Synthesizing; Thesis; Universal Themes; Writing Process
    PHIL: Christianity; Common Good; Minorities; Shared Values; Tolerance; Values
    SOC: 10 genOn; Parochial
6-8

Building Blocks of a Community (6th Grade)

In this lesson, students analyze and define the concept of community. The students identify benefits and sacrifices involved in actions for the common good in their role as citizens.

  1. Building Blocks of a Community (6th Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Altruism; Benefits; Character; Common Good; Community; Contribute; Courage; Egoism; Empathy; Empower; Fundraising; Giving; Justice; Kindness; Leadership; Philanthropic Act; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Trust; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Cultures; Democratic Values; Incentives; School Community; Tolerance
6-8

Call to Action (A)!: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (6th)

Students will understand philanthropy. They will analyze acts of kindness to determine how they contribute to the common good. Learners will investigate their own resources of time, talent and treasure they have and brainstorm how these can be used to address community needs/issues or problems in their school, neighborhood and larger community. They will investigate nonprofit organizations that contribute to the common good by addressing these needs.

  1. What Is Philanthropy?: Philanthropy Lesson (6th)

    ELA: Listening; Reading; Understanding/Interpretation; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Kindness; Need; Opportunity Costs; Time/Talent/Treasure
  2. Need for Action (The):
    Philanthropy Lesson (6th)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Research; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Community; Need; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: School Community; Wants/Needs
6-8

Character Education: Caring (Grade 6)

Learners recognize that famous philanthropists started with small acts of kindness before they performed the influential acts that we remember them for. Learners define caring through discussion of examples and create an acrostic using the word CARING. Learners get inspiration from the work and words of Mother Teresa about performing small acts of kindness. The unit is culminated with the learners selecting a project and making a plan for carrying out a small act of kindness with a group or individually. After reflecting on their experience with performing an act of kindness, they will compare their experience to the message in a folktale, and write about the impact of a single small act of caring.

Focus Questions:

What role does caring play in relationships and life success?  How can developing caring equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Circle of Caring

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Common Good
    SOC: Good Character
  2. Random Acts of Kindness

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Creative Writing; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Common Good
    SOC: Good Character
  3. Feed Just One

    ELA: Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Common Good
    SOC: Mother Teresa; Good Character
  4. One Small Act

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Mother Teresa; Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring
    SOC: Good Character
  5. Caring Makes a Difference

    ELA: Brave Little Parrot (The); Folktales; Genre; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Reflection
    SOC: Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Caring (Grade 7)

Learners discover how celebrities demonstrate their caring by giving their time, talent and treasure and taking action for specific causes. It gives the learners an opportunity to begin to think of what they care about. Learners will discuss a quote about gratitude and consider the relationship between caring and gratitude. Learners read about the work of Oprah Winfrey and define enlightened self-interest and pro-social behavior. After discussing causes and social issues they care about, they will write one idea for an action they can take to "make a difference to that one."

Focus Questions:

What role does caring play in relationships and life success?  How can developing caring equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. How Do They Care?

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Reflection
    SOC: 6 genOn; Good Character
  2. Caring and Gratitude

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Foundations
    SOC: Matthew McConaughey
  3. Oprah Winfrey

    ELA: Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Common Good
    SOC: Winfrey, Oprah; Good Character; Justice
  4. How Can We Care?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Journaling
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring
    SOC: Good Character
  5. Make a Difference to One

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Common Good; Enlightened Self-Interest
    SOC: Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Caring (Grade 8)

This unit allows learners to investigate and expand their understanding of caring and to identify things or people they care about. They will determine different ways that they can show caring; relate enlightened self-interest to caring by discussing a quote from Alexis de Tocqueville about the American tradition of democracy; and they will reflect on how philanthropy, enlightened self-interest and caring are related.

Focus Questions:

What role does caring play in relationships and life success?  How can developing caring equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Stick Your Neck Out

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Empathy; Selflessness
    SOC: Good Character
  2. Defining Caring

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Journaling; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Altruism; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Common Good; Empathy; Selflessness
    SOC: Good Character
  3. What Type of Caring?

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Tocqueville, Alexis de; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Enlightened Self-Interest
    SOC: Good Character
  4. The Rewards of Caring

    ELA: Group Discussions; vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Common Good; Enlightened Self-Interest; Selflessness
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Incentives
  5. Caring and Self-Interest

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling
    PHIL: Altruism; Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Caring; Enlightened Self-Interest; Philanthropy; Reflection
    SOC: Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Courage (Grade 6)

In this unit the learners will define courage and relate courage to the the concept of a "hero."  They will learn about a hero, Nelson Mandela, whose actions changed the course of history. Using their knowledge of courage, the learners determine a person of courage who is a hero and share that by creating a commemorative "postage stamp."  

Focus Questions:

What role does courage play in relationships and life success?  How can developing courage equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Courageous Heroes

    ELA: Teamwork; Writing
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Character Education: Courage; Courage
    SOC: Mandela, Nelson
  2. Everyday Courage

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Metaphor; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good
  3. Courage to Change the World

    ELA: Reading; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes; Human Rights; Social Action
    SOC: Mandela, Nelson; Good Character; Human Rights; Tolerance
  4. Stamp of Courage

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reading
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes; Tolerance; Values
    SOC: Good Character; Human Rights; Values
  5. Heroes and Courage

    ELA: Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes
    SOC: Good Character; Values
6-8

Character Education: Courage (Grade 7)

By identifying examples of courage from the actions of Jackie Robinson, learners discover that it takes courage to do the right thing in the face of peer pressure. They are asked to brainstorm issues that require courage to address. They define what a hero is and reflect on what causes they feel passionate enough about to face with courage.

Focus Questions:

What role does courage play in relationships and life success?  How can developing courage equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Bigger Than Life

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes; Social Action
    SOC: Robinson, Jackie; Good Character; Values
  2. Doing the Right Thing

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage
    SOC: Robinson, Jackie; Good Character; Heroes; Values
  3. The Hero Is in You

    ART: Music
    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes; Reflection
    SOC: Good Character; Values
  4. Issues to Stand By

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage
    SOC: Good Character; Human Rights; Values
  5. What Is Your Thing?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes; Social Action
    SOC: Good Character; Human Rights; Values
6-8

Character Education: Courage (Grade 8)

This unit asks learners to choose their favorite heroes from the "Star Wars" or other movies and identify acts of courage. Using charts created in lesson one, learners find hero traits related to courage and facing daunting challenges. After highlighting the key words explaining the classic hero myth, learners look for  these traits in themselves, the Founding Fathers, and our current leaders. The learners will then reflect on the relationship between courage and fear, and identify the different character attributes that guide us when facing a challenge.

Focus Questions:

What role does courage play in relationships and life success?  How can developing courage equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Classic Hero

    ELA: Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes; Values
    SOC: Good Character
  2. Hero Traits

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes
    SOC: Good Character; Human Rights; Values
  3. Hero Stories Teach

    ELA: Creative Writing; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes
    SOC: Good Character
  4. Courage in Action

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  5. Facing Fear with Courage

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Courage; Courage; Heroes; Reflection
    SOC: Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Fairness (Grade 6)

In this unit, students construct a definition for fairness and compare and contrast definitions with others. They discuss how there are two sides to most fairness issues. Students compare and contrast both sides of two fairness issues--one global and one personal. They reflect on when fairness is a matter of perspective and when fairness is a matter to advocate for through citizen action. Students participate in a role-play of fair and unfair decision-making. They identify behaviors that promote and put up barriers to making decisions. After a read-aloud, students compare the lesson in the text to real-life situations. Students use a Frayer model graphic organizer to analyze the term impartial. In the final reflection, students identify a personal bias and make a written plan for overcoming the bias now that they are aware of it.

Focus Question: What role does fairness play in relationships and life success? How can developing fairness equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Is That Fair?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Empathy; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Consensus; Cooperative Groups
  2. Seeing the Other Side

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Debate; Journaling; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Empathy; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Equality; Good Character
  3. Refusing to Budge

    ELA: Sneetches and Other Stories, The; Zax, The; Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Debate; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Conflict Resolution; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  4. Fair and Impartial

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  5. Recognizing Bias

    ELA: Journaling; Personal Response; Self-Assessment
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Empathy; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Fairness (Grade 7)

In this unit, the teacher poses several questions to spark conversation and critical thinking about the meaning of fairness. Students work together to create a definition of fairness. In the story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, students identify the barriers and challenges to addressing an unfair situation. Given a list of ways to respond to unfair situations, students match ways to respond to possible unfair situations. Students work in small groups to analyze personal responses to a specific unfair situation. Students play a simulation game that raises awareness of their power to take action for the good of others. In the final reflection, students connect the concepts of fairness and philanthropy through written response to a quote or personal experience.

Focus Question: What role does fairness play in relationships and life success? How can developing fairness equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?
  1. Was That Fair?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Debate; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Empathy; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Consensus; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  2. Fair Responses to Unfair Acts

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Conflict Resolution; Fairness
    SOC: Parks, Rosa; Analyze/Interpret; Civil Rights
  3. What Can We Do?

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Conflict Resolution; Empathy; Fairness; Leadership; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Consensus; Cooperative Groups; Good Character; Justice
  4. Middle School Game

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Empathy; Empower; Fairness; Leadership; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cooperative Groups; Good Character; Rules
  5. Fairness and Philanthropy

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Fairness (Grade 8)

In this unit, students define the meaning of fairness and compare and contrast it with the meaning of justice and equitable treatment. Learners discuss the fair use of copyrighted music. They explore how downloading music and movies affects the artists and producers who created the pieces. Students meet in a "round" to discuss issues of fairness related to the common good. Learners read about and discuss Fair Trade and how it relates to justice, fairness, and equity. Students reflect on their attitude about and responsibility for making fair choices about spending. They use the literary device of metaphor for expressing their thoughts.

Focus Question: What role does fairness play in relationships and life success? How can developing fairness equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?
  1. What Is Justice?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Consensus; Cooperative Groups; Good Character; Justice
  2. Fair Use and Music

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Debate; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Consensus; Cooperative Groups; Good Character; Justice; Rules
  3. Music and Fairness in a Round

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Debate; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Good Character; Justice; Rules
  4. Fair Trade

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Informational Media; Personal Response; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Empathy; Fairness; Global Community; Philanthropic Organization; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cooperative Groups; Developing Countries; Economics; Justice; Trade
  5. Fairness Metaphor

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Metaphor; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Fairness; Fairness; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Honesty (Grade 6)

Students define honesty as fairness and straightforward conduct. They look for examples in a story and expand on the definition. They brainstorm examples of honesty and communicate its value and benefits to the community, family, friends, and self. Students use journaling or role-play to reflect on the benefits to the community of truthfulness and straightforward actions. They analyze traits and actions of someone who has built a "good reputation."

Focus Questions:

What role does honesty play in relationships and life success?  How can developing honesty equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. What Is a Promise?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty
    SOC: Good Character; Values
  2. What Is Honesty?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty
    SOC: Common Good
  3. A Straightforward Approach

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty
    SOC: Good Character; Values
  4. Always Tell the Truth

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Sam Rayburn; Character Education: Honesty; Honesty; Integrity
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Constitution
  5. A Person of Honor

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty
    SOC: Gandhi, Mohandas; Good Character; Values
6-8

Character Education: Honesty (Grade 7)

Students explore the meaning of honesty related to playing by the rules and making choices that support the common good. They discuss and illustrate how people could respond honestly or dishonestly to the same situation. They learn vocabulary related to honesty. Students role-play using  familiar scenarios in ways that follow the rules and support straightforward communication, and also ways that do not support the rules. They will discuss the value of rules for supporting the common good and reflect in writing on the role of common good and honesty when rules are not clearly stated.

Focus Questions:

What role does honesty play in relationships and life success?  How can developing honesty equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Playing by the Rules

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Common Good; Honesty; Responsibility; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Values
  2. Act of Honesty

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Communicate; Role-Play
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Common Good; Honesty; Responsibility
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Values
  3. Acting it Out

    ART: Theater
    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Group Discussions; Reflection; Role-Play; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty; Responsibility; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Values
  4. Honesty and the Common Good

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Common Good; Honesty
    SOC: Jordan, Barbara; Common Good; Good Character; Values
  5. Good Judgment and Honesty

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Common Good; Honesty
    SOC: Jordan, Barbara; Common Good; Good Character; Values
6-8

Character Education: Honesty (Grade 8)

Discussing different types of lies and rating them in their severity and damage to others helps the students understand about communicating honestly. They explore different ways communication can be changed through interpretation and by intentionally misleading. The students explore how people can be dishonest with themselves, and they reflect on how they can be honest with themselves about community and world issues and take personal responsibility.

Focus Questions:

What role does honesty play in relationships and life success?  How can developing honesty equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

 

 

  1. Are All Lies the Same?

    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty
    SOC: Good Character
  2. Honest Communication

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Common Good; Honesty
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character
  3. Honesty in Writing

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Language Style; Writing Process
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty
    SOC: Common Good
  4. To Thyself Be True

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character
  5. Avoiding Reality

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Creative Writing; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Honesty; Honesty; Responsibility
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Integrity (Grade 6)

Students define the character trait integrity and examine where they learn what is "right." Lesson Two examines the other part of the defintion, "doing what's right."  Lesson Three features Frederik de Klerk as an example of integrity. Lesson Four features scenarios in which students discuss integrity and provide rationale for their thinking. In Lesson Five, students demonstrate their understanding of integrity through reflecting and writing on quotes or personal experience.

Focus Question: What role does integrity play in relationships and life success? How can developing integrity equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Knowing What's Right

    ELA: Graphic Organizer
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Friendship; Integrity
    SOC: Community; Family; Good Character; Interdependence; Religion; Traditions
  2. Doing What's Right

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Good Character
  3. A Decision of Integrity

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Group Discussions; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Conflict Resolution; Integrity; Leadership; Reflection
    SOC: De Klerk, Frederik; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Diverse Communities; Ethics; Good Character; Government; Major World Regions
  4. Acting with Integrity

    ELA: Debate; Group Discussions; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Conflict Resolution; Integrity; Problem Solving; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  5. Integrity and Me!

    ELA: Inferences/Generalizations; Journaling
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Integrity (Grade 7)

Lesson one examines the meaning of "Be true to yourself" and questions what changes when the words "and others" are added to the definition of integrity. Lesson two compares two definitions of integrity.  Lesson three provides an example of integrity in Patrick Henry. Lesson four features scenarios that bring integrity to life. Lesson five provides the opportunity to make meaning of integrity through writing and or drawing.

Focus Question: What role does integrity play in relationships and life success? How can developing integrity equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Be True to Yourself

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character
  2. What's Real and What's True

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Debate; Group Discussions; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  3. Patrick Henry's Integrity

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Conflict Resolution; Integrity; Leadership; Perseverance
    SOC: Henry, Patrick; Bill of Rights; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Constitution; Good Character; Liberty; Limited Government
  4. Living Integrity

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Debate; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Conflict Resolution; Integrity; Leadership; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  5. Meaning for Me

    ELA: Communicate; Journaling; Narrative Writing; Nonverbal Communication; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Integrity (Grade 8)

In this unit, students construct the meaning of integrity and explore the concept of "being true to yourself and others." They read about Elizabeth Cady Stanton as a model of integrity through actions and personal words toward the common good.  Learners examine scenarios and ask the question, "Is this person acting with integrity?" And as a reflection, students write responses to quotes about integrity as they relate to the student's life experiences.

Focus Question: What role does integrity play in relationships and life success? How can developing integrity equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Principles of Integrity

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  2. And Others?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Leadership; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Good Character
  3. Integrity - Stanton Style

    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Leadership; Reflection
    SOC: Stanton, Elizabeth Cady; Abolition; Amendments to Constitution; Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Civil Rights; Good Character; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
  4. Choices of Integrity

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Debate; Group Discussions; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Conflict Resolution; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  5. Quotes of Integrity

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Integrity; Integrity; Reflection
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Perseverance (Grade 6)

Students analyze and define the word perseverance as it applies to Martin Luther King, Jr. They relate perseverance to setting and reaching goals. Through a discussion of impulse spending and opportunity cost, students learn about the value of perseverance as it relates to setting goals and sticking with them. They brainstorm a variety of short-term and long-term goals as an activity leading to each student developing plans for a single goal. Each student sets an individual goal using a goal-setting strategy. The class reflects on perseverance and how to persevere when the plan gets difficult to carry out.

Focus Questions:

What role does perseverance play in relationships and life success?  How can developing perseverance equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. A Dream for a Better Life

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; Parks, Rosa; Civil Rights; Common Good; Good Character; Social Action; Values
  2. Goals and Perseverance

    ELA: Brainstorming; Creative Writing; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Poetry; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; Civil Rights; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Social Action
  3. In- "cent" -ives

    ELA: Group Discussions; Personal Response; Reflection; Synthesis
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Opportunity Cost; Perseverance
    SOC: Good Character; Opportunity Costs; Values
  4. Long-Term Goals

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Opportunity Cost; Perseverance
    SOC: Opportunity Costs; Values
  5. Planning to Persevere

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
    SOC: Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Perseverance (Grade 7)

Students look for examples of personal best in a movie about perseverance and discuss the value of working toward personal best even when it is difficult. They analyze the meaning of personal best and recognize the value of persistence in doing their best. Students choose two causes or issues that they feel most concerned about. With those in mind, they explore how perseverance and doing their personal best are the most effective ways to address needs.

Focus Questions:

What role does perseverance play in relationships and life success?  How can developing perseverance equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. My Personal Best

    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance; Sensitivity; Teamwork
    SOC: Good Character
  2. A Long Walk

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
  3. Persistent Drop of Water

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Earth Changes; Erosion
    SOC: Geography; Good Character
  4. Small Actions with Big Purpose

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Journaling
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Needs Assessment; Perseverance
    SOC: Common Good; Decision Making Model
  5. Reflection on the Long Term

    ELA: Eliot, T. S.; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Contribute; Perseverance; Social Action
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
6-8

Character Education: Perseverance (Grade 8)

Perseverance involves staying with a task even if it is difficult. Students identify obstacles and barriers they must overcome in order to reach a goal. They brainstorm universal obstacles to completing goals in difficult situations and then they write creative one-liners to help them face obstacles with determination and humor. As a reflection, students illustrate a conversation about perseverance between Lyndon B. Johnson and an imaginary opponent.

 Focus Questions:

What role does perseverance play in relationships and life success?  How can developing perseverance equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Don't Give Up

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
    SOC: Good Character
  2. Obstacles to Perseverance

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
    SOC: Good Character
  3. Taking on a Task

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
    SOC: Good Character; Values
  4. Facing Obstacles with Creativity and Humor

    ELA: Creative Writing; Social/Cultural Issues; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
  5. Talking Heads

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Role Play
    PHIL: Character Education: Perseverance; Perseverance
    SOC: Johnson, Lyndon B.; Good Character; Values
6-8

Character Education: Respect (Grade 6)

Learners define respect and explore the meaning of self-respect and respect for others. They explore the relationship of "respect" to definitions and examples of prejudice, bias, racism, and stereotype. Students recognize prejudice and examine how they perceive others. Learners discover how prejudices are learned and reflect on how to be more respectful of others. The learners are challenged to enhance respect in their personal relationships.  They define actions they can take to enhance respect in their school and community.

Focus Questions:

What role does respect play in relationships and life success?  How can developing respect equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Defining Respect

    ELA: Group Discussions; Language/Style; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Discrimination; Diversity; Prejudice; Racism; Stereotypes
  2. Respecting Diversity

    ELA: Sneetches and Other Stories (The); Group Discussions; Language/Style; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Conflict Resolution; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Discrimination; Diversity; Prejudice; Racism; Stereotypes
  3. Investigating Respect

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Johnson, Lyndon B.; Discrimination; Diversity; Prejudice; Stereotype
  4. Carefully Taught

    ART: Music
    ELA: Communicate; Creative Writing; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Common Good; Discrimination; Diversity; Prejudice; Racism; Stereotypes
  5. Respect in Action

    ELA: I'm OK--You're OK; Group Discussions; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Community; Tolerance
6-8

Character Education: Respect (Grade 7)

In this unit the learners define respect as "valuing yourself/being proud of who you are, valuing others; valuing the world around you; being courteous with others and tolerant of personal differences." 
They relate it to the core values and beliefs of a constitutional democracy. Using the historical biography of Cynthia Ann Parker, they cite examples of respect/disrespect. The students investigate their perceptions about bullying and its relationship to respect. They brainstorm ways to promote respect of self and others and the world around them. The learners discuss a quote from Congresswoman Barbara Jordan and reflect on the meaning of respect for themselves as individuals. They commit their support to a plan for promoting respect in their school.

Focus Questions:
What role does respect play in relationships and life success?  How can developing respect equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Respect and Democracy

    ELA: Journaling
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect
    SOC: Democracy; Democratic Values
  2. Bullying

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect
    SOC: Conflict Resolution
  3. Cynthia Ann Parker

    ELA: Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Parker, Cynthia Ann; Discrimination; Diversity; Stereotypes
  4. Valuing the World Around You

    ELA: Brainstorming; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Responsibility
    SOC: Muir, John; Common Good
  5. Advocating for Respect

    ELA: Group Discussions; Perception; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect
    SOC: Jordan, Barbara
6-8

Character Education: Respect (Grade 8)

In this unit, learners investigate the meaning of respect, especially as it relates to respecting members of diverse groups. Students analyze the dynamics of group formation and describe how inclusion and exclusion from groups can result in conflict and disrespect. They will discover the basic right of all people to be respected and determine ways of showing respect for others by examining and reflecting on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Focus Question:

What role does respect play in relationships and life success?  How can developing respect equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Belonging

    ELA: Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance; Values
    SOC: Good Character
  2. Group Alignment

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Journaling; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Diversity
  3. First Impressions

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Sensitivity; Stereotypes
    SOC: Good Character; Values
  4. Definitions of Respect

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Discrimination; Diversity; Prejudice; Racism; Stereotypes
  5. Respect and Human Rights

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character Education: Respect; Respect
    SOC: Good Character; Human Rights
6-8

Character Education: Responsibility (Grade 6)

Students create a definition of responsibility from their experiences and gain insight into ways that sixth graders are responsible. Through a scenario, students examine the steps of decision-making in taking responsibility.  Through text, students examine Lorenzo De Zavala's responsibility in early and later life. Students gain insights into people's choices about responsibility through scenarios. Through a choice of prompts, students will reflect on and express their understanding of being responsible.

Focus Question:  What role does responsibility play in relationships and life success? How can developing responsibility equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Assuming Responsibility

    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Personal Response; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Character Education: Responsibility; Motivation for Giving; Responsibility
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
  2. Steps to Responsibility

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Philanthropic Act; Problem Solving; Responsibility
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
  3. Lorenzo de Zavala

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Compare/Contrast; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Humanitarian; Responsibility
    SOC: Zavala, Lorenzo de; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Health and Disease
  4. Following Through

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Role-Play
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Integrity; Responsibility; Trust
    SOC: Choices/Consequences
  5. My Responsibility

    ELA: Personal Response; Reflection; Self-Assessment
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Integrity; Responsibility
    SOC: Common Good
6-8

Character Education: Responsibility (Grade 7)

Students explore the meaning of responsibility through examining choices, making decisions, and experiencing consequences. Learners explore the definition of responsibility as "following tasks to completion." They analyze a scenario for the problem, consequences, and possible solutions. Learners connect completing tasks with maintaining trust. Students examine the life of Mr. James Stephen Hogg through the lens of responsibility (dependability and completing tasks). Through role playing a scenario, students with different perspectives will make decisions about responsibility. Reflecting on a quote or a personal experience, students will share their thinking on responsibility defined as following through on a committment or task.

Focus Question: What role does responsibility play in relationships and life success? How can developing responsibility equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

 

  1. What Choice Do You Have?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Conflict Resolution; Family; Responsibility
    SOC: Decision Making Model
  2. Let's Get it Done

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Conflict Resolution; Responsibility; Trust
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Cooperative Groups; Decision Making Model; Interdependence
  3. James Stephen Hogg

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Advocacy; Character Education: Responsibility; Responsibility; Social Action; Values
    SOC: Hogg, James Stephen; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Cooperative Groups
  4. A New Perspective

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Conflict Resolution; Responsibility; Trust
    SOC: Cooperative Groups
  5. Responsibility in the Final Analysis

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Reflection
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Responsibility
    SOC: Ethics
6-8

Character Education: Responsibility (Grade 8)

Students construct meaning of the concept of responsibility through personal and shared discussion. Students investigate the benefits/consequences of taking responsbility and not taking responsibility. Students examine the consequences of Abraham Lincoln's responsible decisions. The introduction of the concept of common good adds a dimension to the benefit/consequences of taking responsibility. Students gain insight into differing perspectives by examining a scenarios and engaging in a debate about the benefits/consequences of taking or avoiding responsibility. Through writing, students share their insights into taking responsibility with the resulting benefits or consequences.

Focus Question: What role does responsibility play in relationships and life success? How can developing responsibility equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Take Responsibility

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Responsibility
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Decision Making Model
  2. Dodging Responsibility

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Responsibility
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Decision Making Model
  3. Abraham Lincoln's Responsibility

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Responsibility
    SOC: Lincoln, Abraham; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Cooperative Groups
  4. Debating Responsibility

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Personal Response; Point of View; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Conflict Resolution; Responsibility
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Decision Making Model
  5. Personal Responsibility

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Journaling; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Responsibility; Reflection; Responsibility
    SOC: Common Good; Cooperative Groups
6-8

Character Education: Self-Discipline (Grade 6)

Students examine the role of discipline in their lives, in the lives of others, and in a civil society. They define self-discipline and compare and contrast discipline and self-discipline. The students read and discuss profiles of people who demonstrated self-discipline to reach goals and have also contributed to the common good. They determine the characteristics of people who exercise self-discipline to achieve success. The students create a plan that includes steps and strategies for practicing self-discipline. They set a personal goal and make a plan for using self-discipline to meet the goal. As a conclusion, they reflect on their level of self-discipline and their determination to increase that level as they mature.

Focus Question: What role does self-discipline play in relationships and life success? How can developing self-discipline equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?
  1. And The Question Is?

    ELA: Concept Mapping; Graphic Organizer; Inferences/Generalizations; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Civil Society; Common Good; Self-Discipline
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Common Good
  2. Discipline vs. Self-Discipline

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Concept Mapping; Graphic Organizer; Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
  3. Profiles of Self-Discipline

    ELA: Biography; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
    SOC: Gandhi, Mohandas; White, Shaun; Whittaker, Jim; Yamaguchi, Kristi; Geography
  4. Becoming Self-Disciplined

    ELA: Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
  5. Just Doing It!

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
6-8

Character Education: Self-Discipline (Grade 7)

Learners experience an opportunity to practice self-discipline, and they compare and contrast discipline and self-discipline. They become familiar with vocabulary and concepts associated with self-discipline and examine the correlation between self-discipline and maturity. They learn about Benjamin Franklin's personal accomplishments and his contributions to the common good, and examine his wisdom about self-discipline. The learners investigate the importance of self-control and self-motivation through analyzing examples of self-discipline. They set a personal goal and describe self-discipline steps to meeting the goal. They select quotations and reflect on their relevance to achieving their goal.  

Focus Question: What role does self-discipline play in relationships and life success? How can developing self-discipline equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Experimenting with Self-Discipline

    ELA: Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
  2. Skills and Attitudes

    ELA: Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
    SOC: Common Good
  3. Benjamin Franklin's Wisdom

    ELA: Biography; Non-Fiction Literature; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
    SOC: Franklin, Benjamin; Common Good
  4. Self-Control and Self-Motivation

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
  5. Go for the Goal!

    ELA: Journaling; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
6-8

Character Education: Self-Discipline (Grade 8)

Learners discuss why some people are able to meet goals and some are not able to do so. They also use a survey to determine a personal self-discipline score. The students define self-discipline by determining what it does and does not look like, sound like, and feel like. Learners associate a list of vocabulary words with self-discipline. They use quotations from author Sandra Cisneros to infer concepts of self-discipline. The learners imagine life changes one, four, and five years from the present time and determine skills and behaviors of self-discipline that will help them be successful in meeting goals for the future. Focus Question: What role does self-discipline play in relationships and life success? How can developing self-discipline equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Resolutions

    ELA: Self Assessment; Survey
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
    SOC: Common Good
  2. What It's Not and What It Is

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
  3. Sandra Cisneros

    ELA: Cisneros, Sandra; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Community; Hispanics; Self-Discipline
    SOC: Cultures
  4. Imagine That!

    ELA: Group Discussions; Predicting
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
  5. Character and Self-Discipline

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection
    PHIL: Character; Character Education: Self-Discipline; Self-Discipline
6-8

Character Education: Trustworthiness (Grade 6)

Learners play a game that helps them identify qualities in others and themselves that make them trustworthy and determine whether you can be friends with someone you don't trust. Students brainstorm ways to build capital in a trust bank account. They read and discuss a Celtic folktale and discuss the role of communication in building trust. Students examine their family trust relationships and connect their experiences with the trust bank account. They brainstorm things their family depends on them for and decide if they feel trustworthy at home. Learners write an acrostic poem using the letters of their name to communicate their trustworthy nature.

Focus Question: What role does trustworthiness play in relationships and life success? How can developing trustworthiness equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

 

  1. Building Trust

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Leadership; Problem Solving; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cooperative Groups; Interdependence
  2. Trustworthy Friends

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; journaling; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Empathy; Friendship; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
  3. A Loyal Friend

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Empathy; Friendship; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Capital; Community Capital; Good Character
  4. Banking on Family

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Empathy; Family; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Capital; Community Capital; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  5. Naming Trust

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Personal Response; Poetry
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Good Character
6-8

Character Education: Trustworthiness (Grade 7)

Students analyze and argue for their feelings about the importance of promises and building trust. They define trustworthy by comparing a trustworthy person to an object using the writers' devise of metaphor or simile. Students read about two very different Texas pioneers and identify how they earned the trust of others. Learners reflect on their own experience with trustworthy behavior or respond to a quote about trust.

Focus Question: What role does trustworthiness play in relationships and life success? How can developing trustworthiness equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Promises, Promises

    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Empathy; Friendship; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  2. Trustworthy Images

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Metaphor; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Contribute; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  3. Defining Trustworthiness

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Leadership; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Good Character
  4. Two Trustworthy Texans

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Contribute; Leadership; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Goyens, William; Maverick, Mary; Common Good; Community Capital; Good Character
  5. Trustworthy Reputation

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Contribute; Reflection; Trustworthiness
6-8

Character Education: Trustworthiness (Grade 8)

Learners play a game that helps them identify qualities in others that make them trustworthy. They explore what it means to develop reciprocal trust within different communities. Students learn about public trust and identify characteristics of public figures that merit trust. They also discuss how they can use their own time, talent, and treasure to support trustworthy politicians, sports figures, corporations, and celebrities. Learners brainstorm the traits of a community of trusted learners, describing what it would look like if students and teachers in a classroom felt a high level of trust with each other. And finally, they compare two communities to which they belong using a Venn diagram and descriptive words related to trustworthiness.

Focus Question: What role does trustworthiness play in relationships and life success? How can developing trustworthiness equip people as world citizens who contribute to the common good?

  1. Trust Leans

    ELA: Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Friendship; Leadership; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  2. Earning Trust

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Journaling; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Empathy; Family; Friendship; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  3. Public Trust

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Leadership; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  4. Community of Trusted Learners

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Empathy; Friendship; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Community Capital; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  5. Trust Circles

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Communicate; Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Personal Response
    PHIL: Character Education: Trustworthiness; Common Good; Contribute; Family; Friendship; Reflection; Trustworthiness
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Good Character
6-8

Common Good in Aztec Culture

Students learn about the Aztec culture and specifically about their religious practices and sacrifices to the gods. Discussions on the nature of sacrifice bring up the concepts of benefits and opportunity costs of specific personal or group sacrifices.
  1. Aztec Culture

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions
    SOC: Communities; Cultures; History to 1620; Native Peoples
  2. Aztec Religion

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Debate; Expository Writing; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Common Good; Hispanics; Opportunity Costs; Religious Perspectives; Sacrifice; Tolerance; Traditions
    SOC: Common Good; Cultures; History to 1620; Individual Rights; Native Peoples; Opportunity Costs
  3. What Is Sacrifice?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Point of View; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Common Good; Opportunity Costs; Sacrifice; Self Interest; Selflessness
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Individual Rights; Opportunity Costs; Social Action
6-8

Communities in Crisis (6-8)

Learners make those critical connections between primary sources and textual materials or secondary sources. The lessons and instructional sequence involve learners identifying philanthropic activities within their own community and state during the period of World War II. Stretching to their community today, they discover the role of ongoing philanthropic institutions and grassroots actions. Two engaging service-learning lessons give cohesive meaning to philanthropy in their community and state.
  1. Primary Source? What is That?

    ELA: Biography; Journaling
    PHIL: Altruism; Social Action; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl; 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Democracy; Human Rights; Primary/Secondary Sources; Values
  2. Giving Beyond Measure—Diary of Anne Frank

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Anne Frank: Reflections on Her Life and Legacy; Anne Frank Remembered; Compare/Contrast; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Writing Process
    PHIL: Character; Ennobled Self; Sacrifice; Social Justice
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Ethics; World War II
  3. Roles of Individuals in the Warsaw Ghetto (The)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Research; Writing Process
    PHIL: Human Rights
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Core Democratic Values; Reserved Powers; Timelines
  4. "A Gem of a Geo-dome"

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    MAT: Area; Congruence; Geometric Objects
    PHIL: Pro-Social Behavior; Sacrifice; Service Project
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn
  5. Who Wants to be an Octogenarian?

    ELA: Interview; Presentations; Reflection
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Sacrifice; Service Project
    SOC: Rosie the Riveter; 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Historical Biographies; Primary/Secondary Sources; World War II
  6. Philanthropy, A Timeline for Us

    ELA: Peer Review; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Contribute; Donate; Foundations; In-Kind Contribution; Learningtogive.org; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Good Character; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Taxation
6-8

Community Connections

To introduce learners to philanthropy and to have them apply this knowledge to assist them in the identification  of some of the various organizations in their community and the services they provide. Utilizing observation and surveys they will become more familiar with the nonprofit organizations in their community and provide volunteer service to one of these organizations intended to address a community need. Learners will use their knowledge of philanthropy and combine it with community information to learn about their community and its needs. Utilizing this knowledge, the learners will participate in a service project directly related to their findings.

Focus Question:

What would happen to your community if no one was willing to give time/talent/treasure?

  1. A Plethora of Philanthropy

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Reflection; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Family; Giving; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Organization; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Survey; Time/Talent/Treasure; Values; Volunteer
    SOC: 8 genOn; Civil Society; Communities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. The Great Adventure

    ELA: Survey
    PHIL: Community; Need; Needs Assessment
    SOC: 8 genOn; For-Profit; Government; Maps; Nonprofit
  3. The Little Letter that Could

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Letter Writing; Reflection; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Service Learning; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 8 genOn; Economics; For-Profit; Nonprofit
6-8

Community Impact

Students analyze how their self-esteem contributes to their identity. They present a project to share their identities in a creative format.  Students determine a community need and participate in a self-selected service-learning project that uses their unique talents and contributions to impact the community. 
  1. What Is Self-Esteem?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Character Perception; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Enlightened Self-Interest; Sensitivity
    SOC: 8 genOn; Social Action
  2. What Do I Control?

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Presentations; Reflection
    PHIL: Character; Contribute; Family
    SOC: 8 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities
  3. What Can I Give?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Research; Teamwork; Voice
    PHIL: Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment
    SOC: 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
6-8

Connecting the Links for a Stronger Community
(7th Grade)

In this lesson, the learners will identify and demonstrate their understanding of what is meant by the term the common good and identify how community (nonprofit) organizations help community members to promote the welfare of their community for the greater benefit of all. The learners will also identify specific needs in their community to which they can apply their time, talents, and treasure to help (nonprofit) organizations in their community meet these needs.

  1. Connect the Links for a Strong Community (7th Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Common Good; Community; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Nonprofit; Nonprofit Organizations
6-8

Courage of the Heart

This unit will show students how acts of philanthropy were demonstrated in the field of medicine despite racial discrimination.  Vivien Thomas shared his time and talent to assist Dr. Alfred Blalock in pioneering a surgical clamp.  He worked in the era of segregation in the United States.  Hamilton Naki assisted Dr. Christian Barnard in heart transplantation in South Africa.  They worked within the system of apartheid.  These techniques would not have been implemented without Thomas and Naki.  Both men worked for unequal pay and without recognition, yet continued to work for the common good rather than personal gain.

Focus Questions:

1) How are people able to persevere and display courage in the face of racism, prejudice and discrimination?

2) What causes people to put the needs of society or humanity ahead of their own personal needs?

3) How does society benefit when all people are given equal opportunities to succeed academically and economically? 

  1. Miracles of the Heart

    PHIL: Blalock, Dr. Alfred; 3 genOn; 5 genOn; African American; Courage; Discrimination; Diversity; Friendship; Health; Heroes; Justice; Respect; Sacrifice; Stereotypes; Stewardship; Thomas, Vivien; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance; Traditions
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Civil Rights; Common Good; Community; Minorities; Racism
  2. African American Inventors Study

    ELA: Biography; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Personal Response; Reading; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: African American; Common Good; Contribute; Health; Stereotypes
    SCI: Data Collection/Organization; Inventions
    SOC: 2 genOn; Civil Rights; Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity; Historical Biographies; Minorities; Racism
  3. Questions of Courage

    ELA: Group Discussions; Listening; Personal Response; Point of View; Questioning; Response to Text/Others; Retelling; Speaking; Stereotyping/Bias; Teamwork
    PHIL: African American; Common Good; Courage; Discrimination; Health; Heroes; Justice; Minorities; Sacrifice; Selflessness
    SOC: Civil Rights; Equality; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Racism
6-8

Courage to Be You (7th Grade)

The purpose of this lesson is to examine how individuals persevere in the face of discrimination and continue on to impact the course of history for the common good.

  1. Courage to Be You (7th Grade)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Non-Fiction Literature; Teamwork; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Justice; Respect; Tolerance; Trust
    SOC: Diversity; Rights/Responsibilities
6-8

Cultural Pluralism in Young Adult Literature—Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

These lessons will expose students to a Newberry Award winning novel about the life and trials of an African-American, land-owning family in Mississippi in 1933. The book explores several instances of bigotry, community capital, and the importance of family. Written from the viewpoint of nine-year-old Cassie Logan, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry is a powerful novel affecting all who read it. It will allow students to read, listen to, perform and respond to a quality, cross-cultural novel. Students will look at the roots of the southern “caste” system and recognize the importance of hearing all voices in the community.

  1. Beginning of the Storm (The )

    ELA: Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry; Character Development; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Historical Fiction; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Family; Social Capital
    SOC: 1 genOn; Community Capital; Discrimination; Great Depression; Reconstruction
  2. Thunder Roles—Town Debate (The)

    ART: Music: History/Culture; Theater: Perform
    ELA: Historical Fiction; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Stereotyping/Bias; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Respect; Stereotypes
    SOC: 1 genOn; Discrimination; Human Rights
  3. What Are Your Thoughts?

    ART-T: Theater: Perform
    ELA: Historical Fiction; Perception; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Human Rights
    SOC: 1 genOn; Discrimination
6-8

Designing Your Philanthropic Collage: Penny Drive

To have learners examine their lives and ambitions, and explore how philanthropy is a daily activity. Through this lesson, the learners will be able to better recognize acts of “everyday philanthropy” and come to better understand their personal traits, and the impact that these might have on their personal philanthropic involvement.

  1. Designing Your Philanthropic Collage: Penny Drive

    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Character; Common Good; Contribute; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Penny Drive; Personal Giving Plan; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropist; Social Action; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement
6-8

Devotions for Young Children

In this faith-based Christian unit, students explore the concept of philanthropy and learn about the nonprofit sector. They brainstorm how they can use (and develop) their English Language Arts talents (including the writing process) to collaboratively create a faith-based devotional for younger children. This unit has a strong youth voice in determining needs and age-appropriate content.

Focus Questions: How can we create devotionals for a young audience so they learn more about their faith? How can we share our faith, time, and English Language Arts talent with a group of young children? What are the elements of our devotional that best suit the needs, interests, and abilities of the children we choose to serve?

 

  1. Share Our Devotion

    ELA: Language Conventions; Reading Informational Text; Research; Speaking and Listening
    PHIL: Christianity; Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Religious Perspectives; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Nonprofit
  2. Market Research

    ELA: Audience; Brainstorming; Communicate; Concept Mapping; Graphic Organizer; Key Ideas and Details; Main Idea; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork; Writing Process; Writing Type and Purpose
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Christianity; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Consensus; Good Character; Personal Virtue
  3. Revising the Devotions

    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Craft and Style; Fluency; Language/Style; Response to Text/Others; Speaking and Listening; Writing Process; Writing Type and Purpose
    PHIL: Christianity; Civil Society; Community; Philanthropic Literature; Religious Perspectives
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Economics; Nonprofit
  4. Final Products

    ART: Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; craft and Structure; Electronic Text; Presentations; Production Elements; Reading; Speaking and Listening; Writing Process
    PHIL: Christianity; Community; Contribute; Cooperate; Fundraising; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Cooperative Groups; Decision Making Model; Goods and Services; Interdependence; Volunteerism
  5. Sharing Our Devotions with Youth

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Audience; Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas; Presentations; Writing Process
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Christianity; Community; Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Distribution; Goods and Services; Nonprofit
6-8

Disaster Relief - Power, Generosity and Leadership! (6-8)

Learners research problems caused by a natural disaster and cite examples of aid provided in an effort to help those devastated populations. They will investigate the role of the four economic sectors in responding to the needs. They will participate in a collection campaign and learn about organizations to which they can contribute their philanthropy.

Focus Question: Whose responsibility is it to help victims of a natural disaster?

To access this lesson, please click here.

  1. Disaster Relief - Power, Generosity and Leadership! (6-8)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Activism; Common Good; Community; Donate; Emergency Response; Fundraising; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Current Events; Disaster: Natural; Economics; Presidential Roles
6-8

Diverse Community: Who Is My Neighbor? (6-8)

Using a variety of activities, students examine the meaning of and examples of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. Students work in groups to propose ways to help reduce stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination.

  1. Stereotypes

    ELA: Group Discussions; Metaphor
    PHIL: Stereotypes
    SOC: Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity; Global Issues
  2. New Kid on the Block

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Empathy; Respect; Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity; Global Issues
  3. Overcoming Prejudice

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Communicate; Group Discussions; Teamwork
    PHIL: Empathy; Reflection; Respect; Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: Civil Rights; Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity
6-8

Doing Our Share

The purpose of this unit is to increase the students' understanding of philanthropy through social studies, math, technology and the arts. The students will study philanthropy from the past to the present in their own community.
  1. Michigan History of Philanthropy

    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Chronology; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Native Peoples; Personal Virtue; Research; Sojourner Truth; Timelines; Values
  2. Grant-Making Foundation (A)

    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money
    PHIL: Foundations; Guidestar.org; Kellogg Foundation
    SOC: 10 genOn; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Goods and Services; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research; Values
  3. Interviewing Procedures

    ELA: Group Discussions; Interview; Questioning; Role-Play; Speaking; Teamwork; Viewing
    PHIL: Community; Foundations
    SOC: 10 genOn
  4. Community Philanthropists

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Interview; Presentations; Self Assessment; Speaking; Technology; Viewing
    PHIL: Community; Foundations
    SOC: 10 genOn
6-8

Earth: The Source of Resources

The purpose of this unit is to assist the learner in developing a deeper understanding of what it means to be an environmental steward and to apply this knowledge, by means of conservation and recycling, to identify environmental misuse of natural resources as found in his/her home, school, and community.


Focus Question: How can I become a steward of our Earth’s natural resources and effect positive change in my home, school, and community?”
 

  1. Our Space Station Earth

    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Recycling; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Natural Resources; Plants; Water
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Environment
  2. Let's Go Camping!

    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Pro-Social Behavior; Reflection; Respect; Rules; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Land Management; Natural Resources; Plants; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Environment
  3. What's Your Motto?

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Pro-Social Behavior; Reflection; Respect; Rules; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Land Management; Natural Resources; Plants; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Environment
  4. What's Happened Here?

    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Pro-Social Behavior; Reflection; Respect; Rules; Service Plan; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Land Management; Natural Resources; Plants; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Environment
6-8

ECHO, ECHO, ECHO—Each Can Help Others

The purpose of this unit is to make students aware of the importance of philanthropy. Historical figures, who acted as philanthropists, have had an impact on society and serve as models of philanthropy. Students will emphasize philanthropic opportunities within the local communities, homes/families and schools. The unit will conclude with persuasive speeches which encourage students to participate in philanthropy in the future.
  1. I Am Who We Are

    ELA: Group Discussions; Perception; Reflection; Understanding/Interpretation; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Compare/Contrast
  2. I Know I Can

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Speaking
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; Helping; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; Communities; Family; Point of View; Volunteerism
  3. Let's Walk That Talk

    ELA: Influence; Persuasive Techniques; Speaking
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Caring/Sharing; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
6-8

Environment: Sustaining Our World (6-8)

This lesson raises the learners’ awareness of water quality, water treatment, and responsible management of water resources around the world. Learners explore the issue of safe water accessibility and discuss responsibilities of a global citizen to assure all people have safe drinking water.  The learners’ experiment with a natural water filtration process. They review the water cycle and come to an understanding  to sustain the quality of the world's water  for the common good. The students will write a "Safe Water" pledge and may choose to sign it indicating action they will personally take to assure sustainable, safe water. They will create persuasive products to share their knowledge of issues around safe drinking water.

  1. Dirty Water

    ELA: Group Discussions; Personal Response; Reflection; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Global Community; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Compare/Contrast; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Health; Water
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Economic Sectors; Nonprofit
  2. Water Purification

    PHIL: 4 genOn
    SCI: Experiment; Pollution; Water
    SOC: Common Good
  3. Who Is Responsible for Clean Water?

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Reflection
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good
    SCI: Water
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue
6-8

Executive Branch—Gifts to the Future (The) (6-8)

  1. Presidential Power and Influence

    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Constitution of the United States; Government; Inquiry; Preamble; Presidential Roles
6-8

Exploring Philanthropic Motivations (8th Grade)

Students will learn about and discuss the motivations for giving. They will explore applications of these motivations to their own lives and to the four economic sectors that were introduced and expanded on in the League Thanksgiving Drive 6th and 7th grade lessons.
  1. Exploring Philanthropic Motivations (8th Grade)

    ELA: Resources
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Altruism; Caring/Sharing; Egoism; Enlightened Self-Interest; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Responsibility; Service Project
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Wants/Needs
6-8

Faces of the Community (The)

The students will learn a little history of the painters Van Gogh and Gauguin. They will learn that the artists, especially Van Gogh, were driven by a need to give of themselves to others through art. They will view an example of how artwork portrays ethnicity. Students will draw their own portraits and create a display of the diverse faces of the community.

  1. Faces of the Community (The)

    ELA: Listening; Point of View
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Community; Giving
    SOC: Gauguin, Paul; Van Gogh, Vincent; Diversity; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue
6-8

Farm to Table and Food Security

Students become aware of the complexity of the issue of hunger in the U.S. as they use research, critical thinking, and problem solving to explore, communicate, and draw conclusions about an issue around food production and distribution. The unit uses the service-learning process, includes philanthropy education components (such as the roles of the different sectors in the issue of addressing hunger), and empowers students to take action to address the issue of hunger in the U.S. (may be in the form of advocacy, direct service, indirect service, or original research).

Focus Question: What farm to table factors affect the cost of food production, and how do choices in food production and distribution affect food security in the U.S.? 

  1. Define the Problem

    ELA: Research; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Advocacy; Hunger; Needs Assessment; Philanthropist; Problem Solving
    SOC: 11 genon; Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Consumers; Developing Countries; Health and Disease; Population
  2. Success Criteria

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Prior Knowledge; Questioning; Reading Informational Text; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Needs Assessment
    SOC: 11 genon; Choices/Consequences; Global Issues; Health and Disease; Research
  3. Generating Possible Solutions

    ELA: Reading Informational Text; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Technology
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Social Action
    SCI: Health; Nutrition; Population
    SOC: 11 genon; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Civil Society; Compare/Contrast; Costs; Distribution; Geography
  4. Pick a Solution

    ELA: Comprehension and Collaboration; Group Discussions; Inferences/Generalizations; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas; Key Ideas and Details; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    SOC: 11 genon; Decision Making Model
  5. Create, Test, Rework, and Present Solution

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Speaking and Listening; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Empower; Leadership; Philanthropic Act; Pro-Social Behavior; Reflection; Social Action
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: 11 genon; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Social Action
  6. Reflection

    ELA: Communicate; Distribution of Writing; Narrative Writing; Reflection
    PHIL: Advocacy; Hunger; Reflection
    SOC: 11 genon; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Community
6-8

Funding the Arts

This lesson will give the students a brief overview of how nonprofit organizations contribute to the common good of the community by supporting the arts. They will role-play as members of the Board of a philanthropic foundation focused on the Arts making a funding recommendation to bring the Arts to the children of the community.

  1. Funding the Arts

    ELA: Presentations; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Community; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
6-8

Games People Play (6-8)

Learners explore the role games play in enhancing the common good, and they identify characteristics of one who plays the "game of life" in a way that promotes the common good. They define the concepts of contract and social contract and make an analogy between civil society and the "game of life" (includes rules, trust, and relationships). Through learning and playing the card game Bridge, students learn and practice life/social skills (problem solving, good character, interpersonal communication, collaboration, and discipline). They also learn valuable study skills of memory, concentration, and critical thinking. 
Focus Question: How do game rules and strategies apply to life? 

  1. Rules of the Game (6-8)

    ELA: Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Social Contract
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Rules; School Community; Social Action
  2. Bridging the Gap with "Bridge" (6-8)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Common Good; Family; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Service Project; Social Contract
    SOC: Consensus; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Rules; School Community; Social Action
  3. Let the Games Begin! (6-8)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Algebraic Expressions; Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Service Project
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  4. Opening and Responding (6-8)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  5. Competitive Bidding (6-8)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  6. Stayman Convention (6-8)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
6-8

Getting to Know the Community

To help students know the structures and purposes of the businesses of their community as well as help them to identify the needs of their community.
  1. Four Sectors (The)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Research
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Civil Society; Compare/Contrast; Economics; For-Profit; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Inquiry; Nonprofit
  2. Exploring Our Community

    PHIL: Commons
    SOC: 10 genOn; Communities; For-Profit; Government; Inquiry; Maps; Nonprofit; Primary/Secondary Sources
  3. Exploring Community Needs

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment
    SOC: 10 genOn; Career Opportunities; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Opportunity Costs; Wants/Needs
  4. Planning Commission (The)

    PHIL: Commons; Community
    SOC: 10 genOn; Adaptation; Communities; Ecosystems; Geography; Human Characteristics of Place; Inquiry; Interdependence; Land Use; Maps; Opportunity Costs; Populations; Values; Wants/Needs
  5. Celebrating the Community

    ELA: Brainstorming; Letter Writing; Peer Review; Presentations; Reflection; Speaking
    PHIL: Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; Economics
6-8

Giving of Treasure: Heart and Mind

As students are engaged in indirect service or advocacy projects, they need a guiding structure for informed giving of treasure. Students will be guided through the process of identifying a community need and researching organizations addressing that need. Based on presentations of available organizations, students will decide how scarce funds should be spent.
  1. Finding the Seed of Need

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Persuasive Techniques; Research; Resources; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Decision Making Model; Human Capital; Inquiry; Scarcity; Wants/Needs
  2. Comparing Apples and Oranges

    ELA: Brainstorming; Presentations; Research; Teamwork; Technology
    PHIL: Guidestar.org; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Decision Making Model; Human Capital; Inquiry; Scarcity; Wants/Needs
  3. Which Shall We Pick?

    PHIL: Community
    SOC: Decision Making Model; Economics; Human Capital; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Scarcity; Voting; Wants/Needs
6-8

Global Education: Why Learn? (6-8)

Students read and learn about a group, IMPUHWE (means compassion in Kinyarwanda), that supports girls’ education in Rwanda. The students compare and contrast attributes of school systems across the globe. They will work in small groups to identify the successes and possible school improvements in their own school system and in vulnerable schools around the world. Students take action by participating in an activity that raises awareness about schools that do not have sufficient resources.

Focus Question: What basic needs does every school need to address to be a good school? 
  1. Schools Around the Globe

    ELA: Research; Response to Text/Others; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Philanthropist
    SOC: Global Issues; Nonprofit
  2. What Makes a Good School?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Reflection
    PHIL: Global Community; Problem Solving; Responsibility
    SOC: Diverse Communities; Global Issues; Government; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. The Power and Importance of Education

    ELA: Audience; Personal Response; Presentations
    PHIL: Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Empathy; Fundraising
    SOC: Developing Countries; Global Issues; Nonprofit
6-8

Global Garbage

This unit is designed to promote an understanding of the adverse effects of the careless actions of people. The learners will be introduced to the vocabulary and the concepts related to trash removal, as well as given an opportunity to collect and analyze statistics regarding the production and removal of trash products. They will be introduced to some of the various careers available in the environmental field and provided an opportunity to explore and implement ways they can contribute to the betterment of their home, school, community, and world environment.

Focus Question: What can I do to help alleviate the problem of land pollution?
  1. Treacherous Trash

    ELA: Journaling; Listening; Reflection; Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork; Technology; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Community; Corporate Philanthropy; Environmental Stewardship; Recycling
    SCI: Air; Animals; Cause/Effect; Ecosystems; Habitat; Health; Pollution; Water
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Environment; Pollution
  2. Talking Trash!

    ELA: Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Community; Corporate Philanthropy; Environmental Stewardship; Recycling; Reflection
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Chronology; Compare/Contrast; Timelines
  3. Digging For Dirt

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Listening; Reflection; Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork; Technology; Understanding/Interpretation
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Corporate Philanthropy; Environmental Stewardship; Recycling
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Environment; Pollution
  4. Conscientious Catalyst

    ELA: Research; Technology
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Recycling
    SOC: Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  5. Collective Compromise

    ELA: Group Discussions; Research; Teamwork
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Corporate Philanthropy; Environmental Stewardship; Recycling; Reflection; School Climate; Service
    SCI: Classify; Measure
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Environment; Pollution; School Community; Volunteerism
6-8

Global Health: Hunger and Food Around the World (6-8)

Students assess their personal diets and view pictures of families around the world with the food they eat in a week. Through awareness and discussion, they view cultural and regional differences. They assess community and or world needs associated with food and health and plan and carry out a service project to address these needs.

  1. What Is a Healthy Diet?

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Personal Response; Self-Assessment; Viewpoint
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Reflection; Sensitivity
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Classify; Compare/Contrast; Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Costs; Cultures; Economics; Health and Disease
  2. Comparing Your Diet to the Rest of the World's

    ELA: Electronic Text; Graphic Organizer; Social/Cultural Issues; Technology
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Empathy; Global Community; Hunger; Needs; Reflection; Sensitivity
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Diversity; Geography; Global Issues; Maps/Globes; Resources
  3. Youth in Action for Global Health

    ELA: Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Research; Role-Play
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Advocacy; Global Community; Hunger; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service; Volunteer
    SOC: Common Good; Global Issues; Health and Disease
6-8

Global Peace and Local Legacies

Students will learn about the life and legacy of Alfred Nobel as well as recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize. They will analyze how the choices made by Nobel Peace Prize recipients led to improvement in the common good. In addition, learners will apply lessons learned to the context of their own lives. Finally, they will have an authentic opportunity to recognize and celebrate contributions which have positively impacted the common good.
  1. Was Nobel Noble? Meet the Man

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Compare/Contrast; Perception; Questioning; Self Assessment; Symbols/Images/Sounds; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Foundations; Global Community
    SOC: 11 genOn; 2 genOn; Common Good; Historical Biographies; Nobel, Alfred; Peace; Values
  2. Projecting the Image - What Can One Person Do?

    ART-M: Music: Analyze
    ELA: Biography; Cause/Effect; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Writing; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: Common Good; Global Community; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 11 genOn; 2 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Historical Biographies
  3. Design of Our Own (A)

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch; Brainstorming; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Altruism; Common Good; Community Foundation; Donate; Endowment; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Volunteer
    SOC: 11 genOn; 2 genOn; Common Good; Compare/Contrast
  4. Breakfast for Champions (A)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 11 genOn; 2 genOn; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Nonprofit Organizations
6-8

Global Philanthropy—The United Way

Students will become familiar with the definition of philanthropy and see examples of it in the community, especially in connection with the United Way.
NOTE:  Arrange in advance for a visit by the guest speaker.

  1. Community by Community

    ELA: Research; Technology; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Resources; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Communities; Ecosystems; Geography; Human Characteristics of Place; Nonprofit
6-8

Great North (6-8)

  1. Great North (6-8)

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Common Good; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; Sharing; Stewardship
    SOC: Diverse Communities; Location; Natural Characteristics of Place; Natural Resources; Research; World Regions
6-8

Grow Involved 6-8

Students discover and discuss the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and especially focus on his ethic of service. The students learn about the issue of obesity through the documentary "Super Size Me" and/or print information. They will understand the importance of eating healthfully and the benefits to individuals as well as for the common good. Students will create a cookbook of healthy recipes to be donated to community organizations. The students learn about environmental stewardship and its importance to the common good by viewing the documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" and/or through print information. Students will decide on and carry out a service project that demonstrates environmental stewardship. Students will learn about the life of Gandhi. They will compare and contrast the philosophies and work of Dr. King and Gandhi. They will determine service they can provide to promote peace and nonviolence.

This unit can be taught as grade specific using two lessons (Grade 6 - Lessons 1 & 2 , Grade 7 - Lessons 1 & 3, Grade 8 - Lessons 1 & 4). To extend the learning and service experiences, additional lesson can be used, as time allows.

  1. Caring About Others (Introduction Grade 6-8)

    PHIL: Conflict Resolution; Sharing
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; Civil Rights
  2. Healthy Eating (Grade 6)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast
    SCI: Food; Health; Nutrition
  3. Environmental Justice (Grade 7)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: Justice
  4. Practice Peace (Grade 8)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast
    SOC: ; Gandhi, Mohandas
6-8

Healthy Youth, Healthy Community (6-8)

The purpose of this Unit is to introduce the learners to healthy living habits both for themselves as well as their community. They will demonstrate their knowledge by participating in various activities making healthy food choices, exercise and helping those of the community do the same. Learners will develop a service learning project based on a community needs assessment. They will reflect on their service project, demonstrate the impact on the community, and celebrate their hard work and success.

Focus Question: Why is it important to practice healthy living  habits and advocate for healthy living practices in a community?
  1. Building a Healthy Classroom

    ELA: Journaling
    PHIL: Community; Reflection; Respect; Responsibility
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  2. Healthy Food and Exercise

    ART: Dance; Music
    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  3. Healthy Living

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  4. What Is Beauty?

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  5. Caring for Community Health

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Volunteer
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  6. What My Community Needs

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Reflection; Responsibility; Volunteer
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
6-8

Helping Children Learn

Learners will increase their reading fluency and awareness of philanthropy by reading to younger children. Through teaming with younger children, they will uncover the meaning of unfamiliar words in context, become more knowledgeable about structures authors use to help young children learn to read, use different strategies to verbalize their books and use encouragement to help young children learn to read. They will determine how their acts are a form of community capital and will identify themselves as philanthropists who help their community. Learners will actively help younger children write and edit their own pattern books and determine the value of their service learning project to the betterment of the community.

  1. Reading to Elementary Children

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Brainstorming; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Main Idea; Peer Review; Reading; Speaking
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Motivation for Giving; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn
  2. Helping Children Read

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Journaling; Peer Review; Reading; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Motivation for Giving; Service Learning; Social Capital
    SOC: 10 genOn
  3. Reading Pattern Books

    ELA: Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See?; Author's Style/Purpose; Fiction Literature; Peer Review; Reflection; Structural Patterns
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Service Learning; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn
  4. Writing Pattern Books

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Creative Writing; Story Elements; Writing Process
    PHIL: Benefits; Community; Opportunity Costs; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn
6-8

Herstory in History

This unit will emphasize the important part women have played in American history and philanthropy. Throughout history, women have taken a stand on issues and acted for the common good. For some women, these stands came at great personal sacrifice and risk. During this unit, students will decide if they, acting as a group, can be a catalyst for change in their school. They will take a stand on the issue of bullying in their schools. They will design surveys for different target groups (6th, 7th and 8th grade classes, teachers, family). In these surveys they will ask for suggestions to solve the problem with bullying. Lastly, students will take a stand on the issue of bullying, support it with core democratic values, data and prior knowledge.
  1. Pocahontas (Matoaka)

    ELA: Role-Play
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Native Americans; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 1 genOn; Cause/Effect; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Common Good; Core Democratic Values; History to 1620; Pocahontas (Matoaka)
  2. Hey Lady! Where Are You?

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Contribute; Heroes; Philanthropic Act; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Timelines
  3. Everyday Heroes Then and Now

    ELA: Kate Shelley; Character Development; Non-Fiction Literature; Personal Response; Reflection
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Heroes; Philanthropic Literature; Selflessness; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Cause/Effect; Economics; Good Character; Industrialization (1800-1900); Industry
  4. Bullying and Core Democratic Values

    ELA: Peer Review; Point of View; Questioning; Survey; Teamwork
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; Philanthropic Act; Pro-Social Behavior; School Climate; School Rules; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Contemporary Issues; Core Democratic Values; Individual Rights
  5. Taking a Stand on Bullying

    ELA: Letter Writing; Peer Review; Survey
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; School Climate; Survey; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Contemporary Issues; Core Democratic Values; School Community
6-8

How Do We Spend, Save, and Donate?: Penny Drive

This lesson will require the learners to explore their thoughts about money and how it can be used in three different ways (spend, save and donate). They will be challenged to explore their beliefs about how people spend, save and donate their money. They will investigate motivations for giving as well as their own thoughts regarding their personal spending, saving and donating.

  1. How Do We Spend, Save, and Donate?: Penny Drive

    MAT: Generalize; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money; Patterns; Proportions; Similarity; Symbolic Models
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Common Good; Contribute; Donate; Fundraising; Motivation for Giving; Penny Drive; Personal Giving Plan; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Budget; Compare/Contrast; Economics; Point of View; Spending
6-8

How the Community Meets Needs (7th Grade)

The purpose of the lesson is to create an awareness of local organizations that provide services for people in need in the community. Students will also learn how help is provided to the community through the four sectors of the economy. This lesson will provide additional background information for students in preparation for the The League Event The Drive.

  1. How the Community Meets Needs (7th Grade)

    ELA: Research; Resources
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn
    SOC: Economics; Goods and Services; Maps; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
6-8

Humane Heroes: Those Who Care Enough

In this unit, the learners will explore some common approaches taken to problem-solve.  They will explore how individuals, groups and/or organizations use problem-solving approaches to resolve community issues or needs and promote the common good.  The unit will offer learners opportunities to explore  ways of addressing issues of animal welfare and humane treatment.

Focus Questions:
What do I believe about the welfare and humane treatment of animals, and how can I act on those beliefs in a rational problem solving manner that promotes the common good?

  1. Got a Problem? Let's Solve It!

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Point of View; Reflection; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; Cooperate; Environmental Stewardship; Problem Solving; Reflection; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Social Action; Values
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Comparative Advantage; Consensus; Decision Making Model; Ideals/Reality; Laws; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action; Values
  2. What Makes a Hero?

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Journaling; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Character; Common Good; Conflict Resolution; Cooperate; Environmental Stewardship; Heroes; Problem Solving; Reflection; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Social Action; Values
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Comparative Advantage; Consensus; Decision Making Model; Ideals/Reality; Laws; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action; Values
  3. I Am a Hero for Animals!

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Point of View; Research; Survey; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Fundraising; Nonprofit Organizations; Problem Solving; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Values; Volunteer
    SCI: Animals; Conservation; Ethics
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Consensus; Good Character; Ideals/Reality; Inquiry; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action; Values
6-8

Hunger and Your Community (7th Grade)

In this lesson the learners will explore the reality of food scarcity and abundance as they relate to issues of wealth and health. They will identity a need in their community and explore ways that they might be able to help reduce poverty, hunger, and ill-health there.

  1. Hunger and Your Community (7th Grade)

    PHIL: 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Giving; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Responsibility; Scarcity
6-8

Investing In Others (6-8)

Students construct a simple shelter to gain a sense of empathy for the situation of people who are homeless. They define and learn facts about homelessness.  Students discuss the word homeless and how it is used in a sentence (as adjective and noun). After reading an article about homelessness by Anna Quindlen, they discuss a respectful way to use the language that describes a group of people who are vulnerable. They reflect on basic needs that may be difficult to meet when one doesn’t have a home. They take action by creating personal hygiene kits or asking a local nonprofit how they can help support their efforts to assist homeless people. The students plan and carry out a project to help people who are homeless.

  1. Building a Shelter

    ELA: Role-Play; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Empathy; Homelessness; Poverty
    SOC: Business; Family; Government; Nonprofit
  2. Without a Home

    ELA: Narrative Writing; Point of View; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Empathy; Homelessness; Need; Respect; Responsibility
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue
  3. Challenges People Face

    ELA: Brainstorming; Infernces/Generalizations; Journaling; Teamwork
    PHIL: Donate; Empathy; Homelessness; Need; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service; Volunteer
    SOC: Economics; Global Issues
6-8

It's Goin' Down; The Rain Forest

This unit is about learners becoming familiar with the rainforest, the problems that are resulting from deforestation of rainforests, as well as other world environments, and how they can become a part of the solution to this problem. Learners will identify concerns pertaining to the world’s rainforests and be able to locate them throughout the world. They will become  knowledgeable regarding the attributes of a tropical rainforest and working with current statistics, they will understand the repercussions of rainforest destruction and how this destruction may personally affect them if deforestation continues at its present pace.The learners will also identify possibilities for, and commit to, taking action against continued deforestation.

Focus Question: How can I be a steward of the rainforests?
 

  1. What's Goin' Down?

    PHIL: Global Community
    SCI: Animals; Compare/Contrast; Ecology; Ecosystems; Environment; Plants; Rainforest; Terrain; Water; Weather
    SOC: Climate; Environment; Geography; Natural Characteristics of Place; Natural Resources
  2. Coming to Terms

    ART: Visual Arts
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Global Community
    SCI: Animals; Compare/Contrast; Ecology; Ecosystems; Environment; Land Management; Natural Resources; Plants; Rain Forest; Terrain; Water; Weather
    SOC: Climate; Environment; Geography; Natural Characteristics of Place; Natural Resources
  3. The Impact

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Lorax (The); Main Idea; Theme
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Global Community
    SCI: Animals; Compare/Contrast; Data Collection/Organization; Ecology; Ecosystems; Environment; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Land Management; Plants; Rainforest; Terrain; Water; Weather
    SOC: Climate; Environment; Geography; Natural Characteristics of Place; Natural Resources
  4. Who Is Responsible?

    ART: Visual Arts
    PHIL: Common Good; Donate; Environmental Stewardship; Fundraising; Global Community; Need; Service Plan; Volunteer
    SCI: Animals; Ecology; Environment; Land Management; Plants; Rain Forest; Terrain; Water; Weather
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Climate; Environment; Geography; Natural Characteristics of Place; Natural Resources; Nonprofit
6-8

Justice and Kindness Play a Part (8th Grade)

  1. Justice and Kindness Play a Part (8th Grade)

    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Understanding; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Friendship; Justice; Respect; Tolerance; Trust
    SOC: Rights/Responsibilities
6-8

Just-Us and Kindness: A Voice for Children (8th Grade)

Students will examine violation of children’s rights through the use of compelling literature. In addition, students will also reflect on examples of human kindness and collective action for the common good (philanthropy).

  1. Just-Us and Kindness: A Voice for Children (8th Grade)

    ELA: Listening; Literary Response; Narrative Writing; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Common Good; Contribute; Giving; Helping; Heroes; Kindness; Selflessness; Sharing; Social Justice
    SOC: Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Discrimination; Human Rights; Justice; Personal Virtue; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action; Tolerance
6-8

Just-Us and Kindness: On Our Terms (6th Grade)

Students will develop an intellectual framework of understanding of fairness, justice, tolerance and equality as critical key concepts/components necessary for a civil society. Students will discuss the importance of acting philanthropically to promote the common good. A deep understanding of concepts will be enhanced as students strive to develop relationships between the concepts.

  1. Just-Us and Kindness: On Our Terms (6th Grade)

    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Group Discussions; Listening; Response to Text/Others; Speaking; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Common Good; Human Rights; Philanthropic Act; Social Justice
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Justice; Tolerance
6-8

Lewis and Clark: Great Journey West (6-8)

  1. Lewis and Clark: Great Journey West (6-8)

    ELA: Journaling; Reading; Research; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Native Americans; Philanthropist; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Cultures; Expansion (1801-1861); Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue
6-8

Litter and Environmental Stewardship (8th Grade)

  1. Litter and Environmental Stewardship (8th Grade)

    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropic Act; Problem Solving; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Conservation; Environment; Natural Resources
6-8

Make That Change

Learners will examine and demonstrate knowledge of philanthropy and its impact on society.  They will evaluate the significance of a philanthropic contributions to the common good and discover how they can engage in philanthropic service.  Learners will also collaboratively determine, design, and implement a service project to meet and authentic community need.

Focus question for the unit: Can one person truly make a difference in the world?

  1. Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things

    ELA: Inferences/Generalizations; Interview; Questioning; Reflection; Understanding/Interpretation; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Altruism; Charity; Civil Society; Common Good; Donate; Philanthropic Act; Social Action; Social Capital; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Good Character; Human Capital; Research; Volunteerism
  2. Look at the Man in the Mirror

    ELA: Biography; Presentations; Research; Viewpoint; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Social Action
  3. A Better Place

    ELA: Biography; Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Helping; Mission Statement; Motivation for Giving; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Social Action
6-8

Make the Connection! Core Democratic Values and Philanthropy

The learner will trace the history of giving in America and connect examples to Core Democratic Values. The learner will also examine ways in which current organizations exemplify traditions of Core Democratic Values through the study of the mission statements of selected organizations. In addition, the learner will focus on ways in which they and their families take part in philanthropy and in upholding the fundamental beliefs of American Democracy. The final activity in the unit will involve students taking part in a project they select that will reinforce the connection between giving and the Core Democratic Values.

  1. CDV, CDV, What's a CDV?

    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Family
    SOC: 8 genOn; Common Good; Constitution of the United States; Core Democratic Values; Values
  2. Searching for the Evidence

    PHIL: Common Good
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 2 genOn; 4 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research; Timelines
  3. Philanthropy and the CDVs

    PHIL: Common Good; Guidestar.org; Mission Statement; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 2 genOn; 4 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Group Discussions
  4. Where Would We Be?

    PHIL: Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 2 genOn; 4 genOn; Core Democratic Values
  5. Action!

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Service Plan
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 2 genOn; 4 genOn; Rights/Responsibilities
6-8

Meeting Needs Four Ways (6th Grade)

The students will discover the importance of and diverse roles of the four U.S. economic sectors (For Profit, Nonprofit, Government and Household) and how they meet the needs of the population. They will explore how these sectors work together to form a civil society.

  1. Meeting Needs Four Ways (6th Grade)

    ELA: Group Discussions
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn
    SOC: Civil Society; Compare/Contrast; Economics; For-Profit; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Need; Nonprofit
6-8

Meeting Needs through Sharing (6th Grade)

The purpose of this lesson is to enhance the learner's awareness and understanding of "homelessness" and the problems and difficulties that often arise out of this circumstance. This lesson will help the learners grow in their understanding that people need each other and what might appear to be an insignificant action on the part of one person can help determine a quality of life for another. The learner will be made aware of the importance of giving and that even things that one might discard can actually be given to and used by other individuals to make their life more comfortable. By doing so one experiences the joy that can be found in giving.

  1. Meeting Needs through Sharing (6th Grade)

    ELA: Listening; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Homelessness; Hunger; Poverty; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Giving; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Responsibility
6-8

Mile In My Moccasins (A) (7th Grade)

Students will recognize the value of giving to the community by looking at examples of the sacrifices and traditions of people of Native American culture.

  1. Mile In My Moccasins(A) (7th Grade)

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Narrative Writing; Research; Writing Process
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; 5 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Charity; Common Good; Contribute; Empathy; Empower; Motivation for Giving; Need; Opportunity Costs; Philanthropic Traditions; Sacrifice; Selflessness; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance; Trust
    SOC: Communities; Cultures; Good Character; Native Peoples; Nonprofit; Research
6-8

Money and Credit: Making Good Decisions (6-8)

In this unit, the students examine closely what it means to spend, save, invest, and donate.  Students will gain an understanding of the importance of budgeting, create a personal spending plan, and investigate the uses and misuses of credit, including installment loans and credit cards.  Throughout the unit, students are reinforced in “the economic way of thinking” with emphasis on improving their understanding of scarcity, the role of opportunity costs in decision making and the responsible use of credit.  Students will use an economic decision making model to choose a service learning project to promote financial literacy and responsible use of credit amongst peers and/or in the community.  Students will be guided through proposing, planning, problem solving, implementing, and reflecting on service projects that meet a real community need.  Finally, students will create and present a demonstration of their service project.

  1. Money Smart Choices (6-8)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Decimals; Percent; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Giving Plan; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Benefits; Common Good; Consumers; Costs; Economics; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Scarcity; Wants/Needs
  2. Thinking about Credit (6-8)

    MAT: Algebraic Expressions; Calculators; Decimals; Division; Formula; Mathematical Vocabulary; Multiplication; Percent
    PHIL: Donate; Opportunity Costs
    SOC: Budget; Choices/Consequences; Costs; Economics; Financial Resources; Scarcity; Spending; Wants/Needs
  3. Deciding to Serve (6-8)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Need; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Decision Making Model; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Wants/Needs
  4. Telling Our Story (6-8)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Communicate; Presentations; Visual Media
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Reflection; Service Project
6-8

Money Smart Teens (6-8)

The students examine what it means to spend, save, invest, and donate with emphasis on the concept of philanthropy and fundamental vocabulary related to economics.  Students create personal spending plans (budgets) and use an economic decision-making model to make an important decision. They also investigate the workings (including budgets) of nonprofit/civil society organizations and participate in an act of philanthropy as a class by presenting funds they have raised to a student-chosen nonprofit. Throughout the unit, students are reinforced in “the economic way of thinking” with emphasis on improving their understanding of scarcity, the role of opportunity cost in decision-making, and the power of incentives in behavior. 

This unit is designed for use with Money Smart Choices: Financial Literacy and Philanthropy, www.learningtogive.org/moneysmartchoices, an interactive web site created through a partnership between the National Endowment for Financial Education® or NEFE® and Learning to Give. The unit can be used effectively even if Internet access is not available to students.  All of the content of the web site is provided in the lesson’s Instructional Procedures or Attachments.

 

  1. Spend, Save, Invest or Donate (6-8)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others
    MAT: Decimals; Percent; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Giving Plan; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Benefits; Common Good; Consumers; Costs; Economics; Opportunity Costs; Resources; Scarcity; Wants/Needs
  2. Thinking About Money and Goals (6-8)

    ELA: Personal Response
    PHIL: Charity; Common Good; Donate; Fundraising
    SOC: Budget; Consumers; Economics; Family; Goods and Services; Incentives; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity; Spending; Taxation; Wants/Needs
  3. Making Good Money Choices (6-8)

    ELA: Questioning; Vocabulary
    MAT: Counting; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Donate; Fundraising; Need; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Budget; Common Good; Communities; Decision Making Model; Income; Opportunity Costs; Resources
  4. Learning to Spend, Learning to Give (6-8)

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Money; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Charity; Donate; Fundraising; Personal Giving Plan; Personal Wealth; Service Project
    SOC: Budget; Economics; Income; Investment; Resources; Spending
6-8

Music of the Civil Rights Era, 1954-1968

Students will be introduced to the “freedom songs” that became an important motivating force during the Civil Rights Movement from 1954 to 1968. Students will experience the aesthetics of music and tie that experience into how the “freedom songs” may have motivated the Civil Rights activists. Students will then form conclusions as to the motivational effects of music on the mind and experience the effect of music on the community through the giving of their time and talent.
  1. Introduction to Music of the Civil Rights Era

    ELA: Informational Genre; Stereotyping/Bias
    PHIL: Human Rights; Respect; Sacrifice; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Common Good; Evers, Medgar; Historical Biographies; Malcolm X; Parks, Rosa; Personal Virtue
  2. Music Motivates

    ART: Music: History/Culture
    PHIL: Activism; Need; Service Project
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Common Good; Evers, Medgar; Historical Biographies; Malcolm X; Personal Virtue
  3. Written Report How Music Motivates

    ART: Music
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Expository Writing; Research; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Common Good; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn
6-8

Mysteries of Egypt (6-8)

  1. Mysteries of Egypt (6-8)

    ELA: Research; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good
6-8

Mystery of the Maya (6-8)

  1. Mystery of the Maya (6-8)

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Primary/Secondary Sources; Understanding/Interpretation; Writing Process
    PHIL: Religious Perspectives; Tolerance
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Cultures; Ethics; Native Peoples; Tolerance; Traditions
6-8

Newborn and Child Survival (6-8)

Students identify the mission of Save the Children and write about the need for saving children around the world. They read and discuss children's right to access to health as required by the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of the Child. They view resources about the health workers who are saving children's lives across the world, and students work in small groups to research and report on five featured countries. They learn that they can support these health workers by choosing a service project to take action for children's health.

Follow this Link to the Elementary Level Unit: Save the Children's Newborn and Child Survival Campaign  

  1. What Is "Save the Children"?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Response to Text/Others; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Advocacy; Global Community; Helping; Philanthropic Act; Poverty; Save the Children; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Family; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  2. Let's See Where the Good Goes

    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions; Informational Media; Presentations; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Contribute; Giving; Heroes; Humanitarian; Hunger; Poverty; Save the Children
    SOC: Common Good; Cultures; Geography; Health and Disease; Human Rights; Maps/Globes; Nonprofit; Research
  3. Action Plan to Save the Children

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Narrative Writing; Reading; Resources; Speaking; Teamwork; Voice
    PHIL: Caps for Good; 5 genOn; Act of Kindness; Activism; Advocacy; Contribute; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Save the Children; Service; Social Action; Volunteer
6-8

No More Hate and Fear—Spread the Word!

This unit will focus learners' attention on the nature of prejudice and make them aware of the positive nature of cultural differences. Learners will apply knowledge of prejudice and cultural uniqueness by teaching these concepts to younger children.
  1. You've Got to Be Taught to Hate and Fear

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Listening; Main Idea; Personal Response; Presentations
    PHIL: Discrimination; Friendship; Kindness; Minorities; Reflection; Respect; Sensitivity
  2. Culture Ads

    ELA: Audience; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reading; Social/Cultural Issues; Speaking
    PHIL: African American; Discrimination; Respect; Stereotypes; Tolerance; Traditions
    SOC: Cultures; Diversity; Minorities; Native Peoples; Racism
  3. Spread the Word!

    ELA: Creative Writing; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Peer Review; Presentations; Questioning
    PHIL: Friendship; Giving; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Respect; Service; Time/Talent/Treasure; Tolerance
    SOC: Cultures
6-8

Nonprofits and Careers

Learners will distinguish between the nonprofit sector and the for-profit sector and identify some of the more common characteristics of each. Using the Action Without Borders/Idealist.org Web site, www.idealist.org, learners will investigate local and national nonprofit organizations by researching their histories, services, and target populations, as well as job opportunities.

  1. Nonprofit or For-Profit?

    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Career Opportunities
    SOC: Civil Society; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. Investigating Nonprofits

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Career Opportunities
    SOC: For-Profit; Inquiry; Nonprofit
6-8

Nonprofits are Necessary (6-8)

The lessons in this unit are designed to help learners become more aware of how nonprofit organizations benefit communities, job opportunities within the nonprofit sector, and how nonprofit organizations outreach to countries beyond local communities.
  1. Nonprofits in Our Community (6-8)

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Communities; Inquiry
  2. What Would You Do Without Nonprofits? (6-8)

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Inquiry
  3. Who Works for Nonprofit Organizations? (6-8)

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Capital Equipment; Career Opportunities; Goods and Services; Human Capital; Inquiry; Natural Resources
  4. Helping Countries in Turmoil (6-8)

    PHIL: Advocacy; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: Democracy; Global Issues; Inquiry; Maps
6-8

Nonprofits in Our World and Community (6-8)

By means of research, personal interviews with nonprofit representatives, and classroom presentations, students will be introduced to the nonprofit sector allowing them to recognize the essential role this sector plays in their lives and opportunities for careers in the sector.
  1. Nonprofits? (6-8)

    SOC: Civil Society; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. What Does a Nonprofit Do, and for Whom? (6-8)

    SOC: 11 genOn; For-Profit; Guidestar.org; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Research
  3. Nonprofits in our Community and World (6-8)

    ELA: Career Opportunities; Interview; Questioning; Research
    SOC: 11 genOn; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  4. Day in the Life of a Nonprofit (A) (6-8)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Interview; Reflection
    SOC: 11 genOn; For-Profit; Nonprofit
6-8

Oil Changes Everything

This unit explores the effects of oil on the environment, people, and wildlife. The learners share their knowledge of the ocean’s environment and how to protect the ocean animals. It includes lessons about the importance and careful management of these resources and the impact humans have on these environments around the world. To be responsible citizens, people must become advocates for the protection of the environment including the world’s oceans. 

Focus Question: Is it the responsibility of every human being to be an advocate for our natural resources and the habitats of the animals on our planet?
 

  1. Oil, Oil Everywhere

    PHIL: Community; Emergency Response; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Oil Spill; Stewardship; Volunteer
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Ecosystems; Environment
  2. Oil + Water = A Mess

    PHIL: 3 genOn; Act of Kindness; Common Good; Emergency Response; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Oil Spill; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Animals; Ecosystems; Habitat
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue
  3. Oil + Water + Wildlife = A Real Mess

    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Common Good; Emergency Response; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Oil Spill; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Ecosystems; Environment
  4. Oil + Water + Students= Knowledge

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Informational Genre; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Common Good; Emergency Response; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Oil Spill; Responsibility; Service Project; Social Action; Stewardship
    SCI: Ecosystems; Environment; Habitat
    SOC: Laws
6-8

One Person's Trash

The purpose of this unit is to help the learners understand the extent of the problems associated with trash and its disposal, and provide them with ideas for recycling and reusing. 
Focus Question: What we can do to help alleviate trash problems in our community, state/nation?

  1. Molehill or Mountain

    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Commons; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Fact/Opinion; Giving; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Neighborhood; Opportunity Costs; Recycling; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Air; Animals; Cause/Effect; Classify; Compare/Contrast; Ecosystems; Habitat; Health; Pollution; Water
    SOC: Environment
  2. Breaking It Down

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Point of View; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Fact/Opinion; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Recycling; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Classify; Compare/Contrast; Ecosystems; Habitat; Health; Pollution; Water
    SOC: Environment
  3. Another Person's Treasure

    PHIL: Commons; Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Neighborhood; Recycling; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Ecosystems; Pollution
    SOC: Environment
  4. Trash to Treasure

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    PHIL: Community; Contribute; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Nonprofit; Recycling; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Environment
  5. Treasuring a Trash-less Tomorrow

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    PHIL: Community; Contribute; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Nonprofit; Recycling; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Environment
6-8

Our Air: The Quest for Quality

Air pollution is an international concern, with our learners serving as the next generation of stewards for our precious resource.  At the heart of this unit is inquiry as learners see the connection to their personal health, develop a knowledge base about air quality issues, and role play an authentic scenario to develop solutions for improving air quality in our local and world community. This unit will also serve to encourage an affective response and motivate learners to act upon this new understanding for the common good.

 
Focus Question: What can we do to preserve air quality for present and future generations?

  1. Clean Air – Our Health Matters

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Electronic Text; Expository Text; Response to Text/Others; Visual Media
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Environmental Stewardship; Responsibility; Social Capital; Stewardship
    SCI: Air; Environment; Health; Observation; Pollution
    SOC: Disaster: Human-Made; Natural Resources; Observation; Physical Characteristics of Place; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Airing Our Concerns – I Can See Clearly Now

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Electronic Text; Expository Writing; Group Discussions; Listening; Peer Review; Reading; Research; Resources; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Thesis; Visual Media; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Conflict Resolution; Environmental Stewardship; Global Community; Responsibility
    SCI: Air; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Critical Thinking; Critique; Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Inquiry; Nature; Pollution
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Disaster: Human-Made; Environment; Laws; Natural Characteristics of Place; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. Concern + Action = Clean Air Solutions

    ELA: Lorax (The); Air; Audience; Critical Thinking; Debate; Ecology; Group Discussions; Listening; Pollution; Presentations; Questioning; Reading; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Speaking; Teamwork; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Empower; Environmental Stewardship; Giving; Opportunity Costs; Problem Solving; Reflection; Service Project
    SOC: Advocacy; Benefits; Cooperative Groups; Decision Making Model; Environment; Laws; Pollution
6-8

Our Unique Legacy of Giving

What factors motivate a community to value giving and volunteering? This unit, modeling the story of one community, inspires students to tell the story of their own people and places. In 2004, West Michigan was recognized by the Chronicle of Philanthropy as the nation's second most generous region per capita. This unit explores the stories, events, personalities, and motivations that create a culture of philanthropy. Using the video documentary about West Michigan as a model, students investigate the profound impact that individual philanthropists (including themselves) can have on their community. Students will create stories and use the stories as a gift to others. Although it was written about West Michigan, this unit is easily adapted to any community, urban or rural.

Focus Question: How do communities impact individuals, and how can individuals impact a community?

  1. Discovering Our Legacy of Giving

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Journaling; Metaphor; Personal Response; Reflection; Visual Media; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Character; Common Good; Community; Contribute; Egoism; Giving; Helping; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Reflection; Religious Perspectives; Serial Reciprocity; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Inquiry
    SOC: Gift of All (The); Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Good Character; Natural Characteristics of Place; Religion; Scarcity; Social Action; The Great Depression; Values
  2. Exploring Our Legacy of Giving

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Literary Response; Personal Response; Prior Knowledge; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Benefits; Enlightened Self-Interest; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Service Plan
    SOC: Gift of All (The); Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Good Character; Natural Characteristics of Place
  3. Sharing Our Legacy of Giving

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Biography; Character Development; Influence; Interview; Language/Style; Presentations; Questioning; Reflection; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Family; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Literature; Philanthropic Traditions; Philanthropist; Reflection; Sharing; Values
    SOC: Gift of All (The); Business; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Environment; Family; Good Character; Natural Characteristics of Place; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Religion
6-8

Out on a Limb (6th Grade)

  1. Out on a Limb (6th Grade)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Prior Knowledge; Research; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Needs Assessment; Responsibility
    SCI: Air; Analyze/Interpret; Ecology; Environment; Natural Resources; Observation; Plants
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Environment; Land Use; Pollution
6-8

Painting Pictures with Poetry: Art from the Heart

Students will find and discuss examples of philanthropy in poems and quotations. They will define and design statements on the theme of philanthropy using the poetic conventions of metaphor, simile and personification. These statements could be used as the text for greeting cards produced for The LEAGUE Valentine’s Day event.

  1. Painting Pictures with Poetry: Art from the Heart

    ELA: Point of View
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Time/Talent/Treasure
6-8

Philanthropic Movements in the United States to 1900

This unit will identify how people and events have allowed us to remain a democratic nation through the development of community and concern for the common good.
  1. The Mayflower Compact

    ELA: Journaling; Non-Fiction Literature; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Common Good; Community; Thanksgiving
    SOC: Pastor John Robinson’s Farewell Letter to the Pilgrims; 10 genOn; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Common Good; Mayflower Compact; Primary/Secondary Sources
  2. 1765 to the Declaration of Independence

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Biography; Character Development; Historical Fiction
    PHIL: Heroes; Philanthropic Act; Values
    SOC: 10 genOn; Declaration of Independence; Historical Biographies; Patriotism; Revolution/Nationhood (1754-1820); War
  3. The Bill of Rights

    ART: Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Expository Text; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 10 genOn; Bill of Rights
  4. 1856-1865 – Abolitionists and the Civil War

    ELA: Uncle Tom's Cabin; Author's Style/Purpose; Historical Fiction; Presentations; Research; Speaking
    PHIL: Human Rights; Minorities; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Abolition; Amendments to Constitution; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Geography; Slavery
  5. Philanthropy in the Gilded Age

    ELA: Journaling; Personal Response; Reflection
    PHIL: Community; Personal Wealth; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 10 genOn; Historical Biographies; Industrialization (1800-1900)
6-8

Philanthropy and Children Who Are Homeless

Students will gain an understanding of the historic roots related to homeless children in American society and the philanthropic efforts made to improve the conditions of these children. The unit also deals with the broader topic of philanthropy in American culture and society in the timeline lesson. Many of the lessons in this unit can stand alone. You may choose to use only one or two of them or use the entire unit.
  1. Traveling on the Orphan Train

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Persuasive Techniques; Research; Teamwork; Technology; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Homelessness; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Inquiry; Orphan Train; Reform Movements (1801–1861); Rights/Responsibilities; Timelines
  2. Was the Orphan Train Philanthropic?

    ELA: Journaling; Non-Fiction Literature; Persuasive Techniques; Reading; Reflection
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Homelessness; Human Rights; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Inquiry; Orphan Train; Public Policy; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. Time Traveling

    ELA: Speaking; Viewing
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Philanthropic Act; Service Project
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Inquiry; Orphan Train; Timelines
  4. Philanthropy Profiler

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Writing Process
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Homelessness; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Brace, Charles Loring; 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Opportunity Costs; Personal Virtue; Volunteerism
  5. If I Had A Million Dollars

    ELA: Brainstorming; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reading; Reflection; Research; Technology
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Common Good; Need; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn
  6. Helping the Needy—What Now?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Presentations; Research; Resources
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Altruism; Egoism; Enlightened Self-Interest; Motivation for Giving; Service Project
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Decision Making Model; Economics; Goods and Services; Inquiry; Maps; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
6-8

Philanthropy, You, and Your World

This unit will allow students to gain a basic understanding of philanthropic characteristics of people and organizations, and how they impact their own lives. Students will also develop an appreciation of the importance of thank-you letters.
  1. Characterizing Philanthropic People

    ELA: Guidestar.org; Journaling; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Common Good; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue
  2. What Does a Philanthropic Organization Do?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Guidestar.org; Listening; Questioning; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Mission Statement
    SOC: 10 genOn; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  3. Get To Know Your Local Philanthropic Organizations

    ELA: Interview; Listening; Presentations; Questioning; Reflection; Research; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Mission Statement
    SOC: 10 genOn; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  4. Letter of Appreciation to Philanthropic Volunteers

    ELA: Letter Writing; Peer Review; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn
6-8

Philanthropy—Sharing Our Time, Talent and Treasure with Family and Friends

Learners will realize the importance of American celebrations through philanthropic actions. They will be able to explain how cultures and experiences shape the lives of their community. Learners will be able to define and identify ethics and philanthropy and relate it to family experiences and others in their community. They will collect, organize and interpret data as to the frequency of philanthropic actions performed by their families and friends. Additionally, the learners will develop greater participation with the community to work toward the common good through philanthropic acts. (Although Lesson One of this unit uses the Fourth of July as the example of a national celebration, the lesson concepts are also applicable to other holidays such as Veteran's Day, Thanksgiving Day, President's Day and Memorial Day.)

  1. Traditions of the Family—American Celebrations and Philanthropy

    ELA: Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Community; Family; Time/Talent/Treasure; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Cultures; Freedom; Inquiry; Primary/Secondary Sources
  2. Ethics and Philanthropy The Act of Sharing and Giving

    ELA: Uncle Jed's Barbershop; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Reflection; Theme; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Decision Making Model; Ethics; Supported Response
  3. Philanthropy Actions of the Heart and Mind

    ELA: Inferences/Generalizations; Research; Survey
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Patterns; Predict
    PHIL: Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Survey
  4. Our Partners in Philanthropy

    ELA: Report; Research
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Veteran's Day
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Community Capital; Freedom; Public Policy; Reflection
6-8

Philanthropy--Why?: Penny Drive

To stimulate the learners thinking concerning the reasons why they might give of their treasure and to have them consider these reasons in light of the impact of their giving upon the recipients of their giving.

  1. Philanthropy--Why?: Penny Drive

    ELA: Understanding/Interpretation; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; Common Good; Donate; Fundraising; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Penny Drive; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Consensus; Ethics
6-8

Philanthropy--You and Your World: Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (7th)

Students will gain a basic understanding of philanthropy and associated vocabulary. They will recognize it in the lives of others in the school, community and beyond as well as recognize their own ability to be philanthropic. Students will gain a basic understanding of philanthropic character traits and apply them to their lives.

  1. Characterizing Philanthropic People: Philanthropy Lesson (7th)

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Listening; Personal Response; Prior Knowledge; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Character; Common Good; Community; Nonprofit Organizations; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Values
  2. Star of Philanthropy: Philanthropy Lesson (7th)

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Guidestar.org; Listening; Personal Response; Self Assessment; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Caring/Sharing; Character; Common Good; Giving; Helping; Kindness; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Nonprofit
6-8

Pick Up a Litter Bit (7th Grade)

  1. Pick Up a Litter Bit (7th Grade)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Fact/Opinion; Group Discussions; Journaling; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropy; Problem Solving; Service Plan
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Data Collection/Organization; Environment
    SOC: Rights/Responsibilities
6-8

Poetry of Giving (The)

The purpose of the unit is that students gain an appreciation of poetry and learn poetic conventions. The students will use their knowledge of philanthropy and poetic conventions to write original poetry about philanthropic giving.
  1. What Is Poetry and Where Can You Find It?

    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 2 genOn
  2. Sounds of Language (The)

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Biography; Historical Fiction; Poetry; Point of View
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 2 genOn
  3. Painting Pictures with Poetry

    ELA: Poetry; Point of View
    PHIL: Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 2 genOn; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Good Character
  4. Connecting Poetry with Philanthropy

    ELA: Brainstorming; Peer Review; Poetry
    PHIL: Fundraising; Service Project
    SOC: 2 genOn
  5. If I Were Bill Gates

    ELA: Brainstorming; Inquiry; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community Foundation; Need; Service Project
    SOC: 2 genOn; Wants/Needs
6-8

Points of Light and George H.W. Bush

Students explore the legacy of George H. W. Bush and how he contributed to the common good as part of his lifelong commitment to service and through his Points of Light initiative. They compare and contrast the four economic sectors and how they meet needs differently. They write a persuasive piece about government philanthropy. They trace the impact of Bush's points of light speech through one organization and advocate for an issue that contributes to the common good.

Enduring Understanding: Students identify George H. W. Bush as the father of the modern service movement and identify philanthropy and the civil society sector as part of the fabric of the U.S. and democracy.

  1. Bush Family and the Common Good

    ELA: Narrative Writing; Presentations; Voice; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Civil Society; Contribute; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Bush, George H. W.; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Economics; Nonprofit
  2. Government Philanthropy

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Benefits; Civil Society; Family
    SOC: Bush, George H. W.; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Civilian Conservation Corps; Costs; Democracy; Economics; For-Profit; Government; Great Depression; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  3. A Thousand Points of Light

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Reflection; Technology
    PHIL: Advocacy; Civil Society
    SOC: Bush, George H. W.; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Economics; Government; Nonprofit
6-8

Pollution Solutions (8th Grade)

Learners will describe water as a scarce natural resource that is often polluted and made unusable. They will research local water sources, describing impairments that pollute water and brainstorm solutions.

  1. Pollution Solutions (8th Grade)

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropic Act; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Pollution; Water
    SOC: Natural Resources; Scarcity
6-8

Power of Children (The)

Driving Question: How can students create positive change in our community?

This is a Project Based Learning (PBL) unit. The students individually identify a need in their community and research how a service-learning project could be beneficial. Students form small groups and create a layout of a service-learning project (including a budget and timeline). At the end of the unit they hold a "Service-Learning Expo," where the students present their projects. The participants vote on the best project, and the winning projects will be implemented by the class or school during the rest of the school year.

  1. Speaking of the Community--Step One: Identify the Problem

    ELA: Brainstorming; Communicate; Group Discussions; Interview; Synthesizing; Teamwork; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Community; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Service
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Nonprofit
  2. Righteous Rubrics--Step Two: Solution Criteria

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Benefits; Responsibility; Service
  3. What Do You Propose?--Step Three: Solution Research

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Electronic Text; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Mission Statement; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Nonprofit
  4. Two, Four, Six, Eight, Let's All Collaborate--
    Step Four: Picking a Solution

    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions; Presentations; Teamwork
    PHIL: Activism; Charity; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Nonprofit
  5. The Expo Experience--Step Five: Create and Run Solution

    ELA: Audience; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Cooperate; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Budget; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Cooperative Groups; Nonprofit; Research; School Community
  6. Mirror, Mirror--Step Six: Reflection

    ELA: Group Discussion; Personal Response; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Reflection
6-8

Power of One—Everyday Heroes for the Common Good (The)

Students will identify “senior citizens” in history who are considered heroes. They will compare/contrast these heroes with heroes in their own community and lives. Students will describe the work of foundations and report on the work of local foundations. The learners will explore the idea that every individual can be a hero and contribute to the common good of the community.

  1. Heroes Here and There

    ELA: Synthesizing; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Heroes
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Volunteerism
  2. Super Seniors

    ELA: Biography; Interview
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 1 genOn; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Volunteerism
  3. Unsung Heroes (The)

    ELA: Synthesizing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Endowment; For-Profit; Foundations; Grantmaking; Guidestar.org; Heroes; Research
    SOC: 1 genOn; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Economics; Foundations; Goods and Services; Nonprofit
  4. Spreading the Good Word

    ELA: Expository Writing; Perception; Presentations
    PHIL: Common Good
    SOC: 1 genOn; Civil Society; Core Democratic Values
6-8

Power to Make a Difference (The)

This unit guides learners to gain awareness of the rich history of philanthropy in the United States, develop a working knowledge of the vocabulary associated with philanthropy, and demonstrate active citizen participation through service related to core democratic values.

  1. Fame, Fortune and Philanthropy

    PHIL: Ennobled Self; Foundations; Nonprofit Sector; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Ethics; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Values
  2. People Who Make a Difference

    ELA: Interview; Questioning; Writing Process
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Core Democratic Values
  3. Make a Difference in Life

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Teamwork
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Service Plan; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Nonprofit; Research; Shared Values; Volunteerism
6-8

Power to Make a Difference (The): Intro. to Philanthropy Unit (8th)

 Learners will develop a working knowledge of the vocabulary associated with philanthropy and awareness of the rich history of philanthropy in the United States.

Learners will understand the importance of working together for the common good. They will create persuasive radio public service announcements about a philanthropic organization and its mission, and justify the personal choice of an organization they would like to support with time (volunteerism) or treasure.

  1. Fame, Fortune and Philanthropy: Philanthropy Lesson (8th)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Nonprofit Sector; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue
  2. Working Together Works: Philanthropy Lesson (8th)

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Common Good; Cooperate; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Volunteerism
6-8

PULSE: A STOMP Odyssey (6-8)

  1. PULSE: A STOMP Odyssey (6-8)

    ELA: Presentations; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Board of Directors; Community; Foundations; Giving; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
6-8

Put Your Hands in Mine (6th Grade)

  1. Put Your Hands in Mine (6th Grade)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Social/Cultural Issues; Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Discrimination; Justice; Respect; Tolerance
    SOC: Diversity; Equality
6-8

Recognizing Philanthropy in Our Community (8th Grade)

Students will describe the characteristics of someone  that help their community and relate it to the definition of philanthropy. Students will contact and  research the individuals or organizations and send them invitations to a celebration designed to honor their philanthropic achievements.
  1. Recognizing Philanthropy in Our Community (8th Grade)

    PHIL: Community
    SOC: Communities
6-8

Recognizing the Faces of Hunger and Poverty
(8th Grade)

The learners will recognize and identify many of the causes of hunger and poverty in the world as well as in their community. They will demonstrate an understanding of ones responsibility to provide for the common good by appropriately responding to the needs of others, particularly those who are experiencing hunger and/or poverty in their community. 

  1. Recognizing the Faces of Hunger and Poverty
    (8th Grade)

    ELA: Listening; Responst to Text/Others
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; 5 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Giving; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Responsibility
6-8

Refugees in Today's Society

Students will identify the differences between refugees and other migrants. They will determine the myriad of challenges refugees face in their daily lives. The learners will define and discuss examples of terms related to refugees and the common good. They will explore the refugee experience and recognize some of the causes and effects of being a refugee. Analyzing The Universal Declaration of Human Rights will offer them the opportunity to relate refugees and themselves to basic human rights and the concepts of enlighened self-interest and the common good.  They will define the words philanthropy and empathy and brainstorm ideas for acting philanthropically to addess the issues faced by refugees or others in need.  Students will also analyze the geographic changes and issues that may cause forced displacement. By using the Model United Nations format, they will create plans that could potentially help refugees.

Focus Questions: What are the present world events that are producing refugees? What sector(s) of society is responsible to address issues experienced by refugees?

  1. What Is a Refugee?

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection; Visual Media; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Enlightened Self-Interest
    SOC: 6 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Common Good; Disaster: Human-Made; Economics; For-Profit; Human Rights; Nonprofit; Refugees
  2. Getting to Know Refugees

    ELA: Analyze/Interptret; Group Discussions; Journaling; Viewing
    PHIL: Empathy; Philanthropy
    SOC: 6 genOn; Common Good; Devloping Countries; Disaster: Human Made; Refugee
  3. Refugees: Issues and Action

    ELA: Group Discussions; Presentations; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Service
    SOC: 6 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues; Current Events; Developing Countries; Maps/Globes; Refugees; Research
6-8

Refugees: Real People, Real Stories, Real Life

During this unit, students will learn about refugees around the world. Using various forms of texts including video media, posters, advertisements, and essays, students will explore and reflect upon the experiences of refugees across the world. Students will learn who is a refugee, why and how people become refugees and what their lives are like before and after becoming refugees. They investigate needs of refugees and design a service project to address a need.
 

  1. The Life of a Refugee

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Civil Society; Needs Assessment; Relief
    SOC: 6 genOn; Cultures; Economics; Human Rights; Refugees; Rights/Responsibilities; Wants/Needs
  2. Refugee Rights

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Reflection; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Civil Society; Common Good; Empathy; Responsibility
    SOC: 6 genOn; Global Issues; Human Rights; Nonprofit; Refugees; Rights/Responsibilities; Rules
  3. Perspectives of a Refugee

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Response to Text/Others; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Empathy; Service
    SOC: 6 genOn; Cooperative Groups; Cultures; Diverse Communities; Global Issues; Human Rights; Refugees; Wants/Needs
6-8

Respecting Diversity—The Road To Tolerance

Learners will explore the issues of religious diversity by dismantling the myths of prejudice through understanding and identifying the causes of prejudice. Learners will complete a summative review of the three major religious groups and will prepare displays to make other learners aware of the common ethics and values all share while celebrating their differences.
  1. What Is Prejudice?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Informational Genre; Response to Text/Others; Stereotyping/Bias; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Human Rights; Respect; Stereotypes
    SOC: 1 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Discrimination; Human Rights; Inquiry; Persecution; Research
  2. From Where Does Prejudice Come?

    ART: Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; South Pacific; Universal Themes; Visual Media
    PHIL: Human Rights; Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Discrimination; Diversity; Ethics; Human Rights; Minorities; Point of View; Racism; Tolerance
  3. Religious Prejudice

    ELA: Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Presentations; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others; Stereotyping/Bias; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Human Rights; Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations; Respect; Service Plan; Service Project
    SOC: 1 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Discrimination; Group Discussions; Human Rights; Inquiry; Religion; Research; September 11, 2001; Stereotypes; Tolerance
6-8

Rights and Responsibilities

Learners will examine the origin and types of rights guaranteed to us by the Bill of Rights, as well as the responsibilities we have to protect those rights for our personal well-being and the common welfare. Finally, the focus will be upon understanding and valuing those rights by promoting the common welfare as an involved citizen.
  1. Roots of Our Rights (The)

    ELA: Listening; Presentations; Role-Play
    PHIL: 9/11genOn
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Common Good; Constitution of the United States; Decision Making Model; Government; Individual Rights; Preamble; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law; Separation of Powers; State Government
  2. "Right" Ideas (The)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Technology
    PHIL: Mission Statement; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector; Social Contract
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Rights/Responsibilities; Values
  3. Rights and Responsibilities Making the Connection

    ELA: Brainstorming; Interview; Research
    PHIL: Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Cause/Effect; Common Good; Good Character; Inquiry; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law
  4. Promoting the Common Good

    PHIL: Volunteer
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Common Good; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law
6-8

Road Less Traveled (A)

This unit is based on the philanthropic beliefs of three cultures (Europe, Africa, and North America) and their impact on the development of the tradition of philanthropy in the United States. The purpose of this unit is to help students gain an understanding and appreciation for the philanthropic contributions of three cultures of America.

  1. Introduction to A Road Less Traveled

    ELA: Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Constructing Meaning; Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Informational Media; Journaling; Prior Knowledge; Questioning; Reading; Research; Vocabulary
  2. Mile In My Moccasins (A)

    ELA: Concept Mapping; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Narrative Writing; Research; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: 10 genOn; Communities; Cultures; Good Character; Native Peoples; Research
  3. Million-Mile Journey (The)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: 10 genOn; Chronology; Communities; Good Character; Human Characteristics of Place; Immigration; Maps; Maps/Globes; Personal Virtue; Timelines
  4. Long Walk (The)

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fact/Opinion; Group Discussions; Listening; Point of View; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: 10 genOn; African American; Cultures; Good Character; Human Characteristics of Place; Maps; Personal Virtue
  5. Finish Line (The)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Traditions
6-8

Role of Philanthropy in an Ever Changing World (The)

This unit illustrates the historical importance of volunteers and underscores their importance in helping others in their communities, states, countries and the world. Philanthropy is not confined to simply helping others, although that is a primary focus. Philanthropists are also active in environmental action, political action (i.e., Civil rights), and social action. This unit addresses environmental issues and ways to address some of them. 

  1. Defining Philanthropy—Who's Phil's Aunt Thropy?

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry
  2. Defining Philanthropy—What? Where? Why?

    PHIL: Mission Statement; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry; Mission Statement; Research
  3. Where Did it all Start? In the Beginning

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Good Character; Government; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Public Policy; Red Cross; Research; Sierra Club; Timelines; UNICEF; United Way; USO; YMCA/YWCA
  4. Where Did it all Start? Time-lines of History

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Timelines
  5. What Do They Do? A Current Events Action

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Social Action; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Cultures; Current Events; Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural; Ecosystems; Environment; Human Rights; Inquiry; Opportunity Costs; Primary/Secondary Sources; Red Cross; Resources
  6. Investigations in Aid—Identifying the Need

    PHIL: Need; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Bosnia; Cambodia; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Economics; Ecosystems; Environment; Geography; Government; Honduras; Industry; Inquiry; Kazahkstan; Nigeria; Research; Resources; Trade; Wants/Needs
  7. Investigations in Aid—Making the Pitch

    PHIL: Need; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Persuasive Techniques; Social Action
  8. Project—Assessing the Need (The)

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service Plan
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Decision Making Model; Voting; Wants/Needs
  9. Project—Making a Plan (The)

    PHIL: Community; Need
    SOC: 10 genOn; Decision Making Model; Inquiry; Service Plan
  10. Project—Going to the Round Table (The)

    PHIL: Community; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Group Discussions; Wants/Needs
6-8

Sacred Giving (Tzedakah) (Private-Religious)

This unit contains primary source materials that are basic to the Jewish practice of tzedakah. The sources are proscriptive and descriptive as well as responsive to essential questions such as: Why are Jews expected to perform the mitzvah of tzedakah? How is the practice to be done? How can I do it?

  1. Sacred Giving: Why? (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Personal Response; Point of View; Summary/Paraphrase; Theme; Viewpoint; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Judaism; Justice; Kindness; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Ethics; Parochial; Religion
  2. Sacred Giving: How? (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Personal Response; Retelling
    PHIL: Hunger; Judaism; Kindness; Philanthropic Organization; Philanthropic Traditions (tzedakah); Sensitivity; Service Project (tzedakah)
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Ethics; Parochial; Religion; Values
  3. Sacred Giving: When? (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Personal Response; Retelling
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Contribute; Family; Judaism; Need; Personal Giving Plan; Sacrifice; Traditions
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Ethics; Family; Parochial; Religion; Values
6-8

Save a Drop For Me

Learners will become familiar with business, governmental, nonprofit and/or individual efforts to keep our water supply clean and promote the common good. Learners will describe water as a scarce natural resource that is often polluted and made unusable for consumers. They will describe philanthropic acts related to water which contribute to the common good and will research their local water sources, describing impairments that pollute water. Through art they will illustrate techniques for water conservation that everyone can use. They will analyze the characteristics necessary for those who participate in clean water volunteer efforts and will describe local clean water efforts.

  1. Selecting the Tap

    ELA: Literature; Research
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Pollution; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Natural Resources; Pollution; Scarcity
  2. Let Us Help

    ART: Visual Arts
    PHIL: 1 genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Learning
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Conservation; Pollution; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn; Economics
  3. Feel The Wonder

    PHIL: 1 genOn; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Reflection; Service Project
    SCI: Data Collection/Organization; Water
    SOC: 4 genOn
6-8

School Environment—Diversity, Let's Deal With It

Learners will develop their own values and perspectives through exploring their attitudes and perceptions of diversity within their class setting and community. They will use the historical Selma to Montgomery March, reading in primary textual account to develop historical perspective as well as current fictional account of diversity within a community. The learners will recognize and describe key participants in the historical setting and identify the elements of philanthropy as demonstrated by those individuals. Learners will conduct a School Climate Survey to address the issues of diversity within their school. Learners will implement a Service Learning Plan of action, addressing at least one issue identified in the School Climate Survey.
  1. Does It Look All Right to Me?

    ELA: Personal Response
    PHIL: African American; Helping; Human Rights
    SOC: Civil Rights; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Community; Compare/Contrast; Diversity; Equality; Good Character; Haviland, Laura Smith; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Public Policy; Rule of Law; Selma
  2. School Climate, Where Are We Now?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Survey
    MAT: Conjectures; Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Generalize; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Infer; Predict
    PHIL: Service Learning; Survey
    SOC: Edison, Thomas A.; Pinchback, P.B.S.; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Diversity; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Personal Virtue; Public Policy; Rule of Law; School Community
  3. What Will We Become?

    ELA: Brainstorming; Persuasive Techniques; Response to Text/Others; Self-Assessment; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Cooperative Groups; Supported Response
6-8

Setting the Stage for Service Learning Relationships

The intent of this unit is to provide students the critical opportunity to become aware of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. The literature component, music, and other activities in this unit provide students opportunities to develop an educated and accurate outlook regarding people of different populations (impoverished, elderly, and mentally and/or physically challenged). In addition, students are affectively engaged to create an emotional framework upon which to build positive and meaningful direct service relationships.

  1. Behind the Scenes—Closing the Curtain on Stereotypes

    ELA: Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Reflection; Research; Resources; Stereotyping/Bias; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Sensitivity; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Cultures; Decision Making Model; Discrimination; Reflection
  2. Center Stage—Focus on Poverty

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Cause/Effect; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Presentations; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Discrimination; Sensitivity; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Primary/Secondary Sources
  3. Center Stage—Focus on the Elderly

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Literature; Point of View; Presentations; Reflection; Research; Resources; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Discrimination; Stereotypes; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 2 genOn
  4. Center Stage—Focus on the Mentally and/or Physically Challenged

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Perception; Reflection; Resources; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Discrimination; Stereotyping/Bias; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 2 genOn
  5. Final Act—Reflections and Revisions (The )

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Constructing Meaning; Fiction Literature; Perception; Reflection; Symbols/Images/Sounds
    PHIL: Discrimination; Stereotyping/Bias; Volunteer
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 2 genOn
6-8

Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure (6-8)

  1. Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure (6-8)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Letter Writing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving; Selflessness
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Water; Weather
    SOC: Antarctica; Sir Ernest Shackleton; Endurance (The); Adaptation; Climate; Common Good; Disaster: Natural; Exploration; Good Character
6-8

Social Action Project (The)

Through this service project, students will have the opportunity to make a difference in their community in a meaningful way through a hands-on service project that will also enable them to learn civic responsibility. Students will employ language skills to expound on the roles played by service, service organizations to the community, and their own experiences as volunteers.
  1. Introduction to the Project

    ELA: Reading; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Nonprofit Organizations; Social Action
    SOC: 10 genOn
  2. Letter Writing

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Letter Writing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn
  3. Phone Calls

    ELA: Brainstorming; Reading; Reflection; Research; Role-Play; Speaking
    PHIL: Service Project; Social Action
    SOC: 10 genOn
  4. Research Paper

    ELA: Interview; Media Genres; Presentations; Research; Resources; Technology; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Social Action; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn
  5. Creating the Pamphlet

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Informational Genre; Persuasive Techniques; Resources
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn
  6. Oral Presentation

    ELA: Audience; Compare/Contrast; Listening; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Response to Text/Others; Speaking
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Social Action; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn
6-8

Sowing the Seeds of Community

In the book Seedfolks, students will examine each character's heritage, motivation and contributions to nourishing and maintaining the garden and how their efforts change their lives for the better.  Students will also identify how the characters have developed a sense of pride and fellowship by uniting in a common purpose. From this examination, students will be able to identify ways in their community that teamwork will benefit everyone. 
  1. Preparing the Soil

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Main Idea; Metaphor; Narrative Writing; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Benefits; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Community; Contribute; Discrimination; Family; Friendship; Homelessness; Minorities; Neighborhood; Philanthropic Act; Problem Solving
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cultures; Good Character; Interdependence; Racism; Tolerance
  2. Planting the Seeds

    ELA: Seedfolks; Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Perception; Personal Response; Retelling; Social/Cultural Issues; Understanding/Interpretation; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Common Good; Friendship; Global Community; Neighborhood; Reflection; Social Contract; Time/Talent/Treasure; Traditions; Trust; Values
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Communities; Contemporary Issues; Core Democratic Values; Cultures; Diverse Communities; Diversity; Environment; Good Character; Human Rights; Ideals/Reality; Individual Rights; Interdependence; Land Use; Minorities; Point of View; Racism; Religion; Tolerance
  3. Harvesting the Crop

    ELA: Seedfolks; Audience; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Personal Response; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Problem Solving; Reflection; Service; Social Action; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Consensus
6-8

Stitch in Time for the Common Good (A)

Learners will understand how past contributions of American scientists have contributed to improving society. Learners will develop an understanding of the importance of participating in active citizenship and making contributions to society. The role of for profit and non-profit organizations, especially non-governmental organizations, in improving the common good will be researched.

How can youth make a difference in their country today?

  1. Active Citizenship through the Spectacles of Benjamin Franklin

    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: 10 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Core Democratic Values; Historical Biographies
  2. The Not-So-Trivial Pursuit of the Common Good

    ELA: Expository Text; Reflection
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Common Good; Foundations; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Data Collection/Organization; Health
    SOC: 10 genOn; For-Profit; Foundations; Health and Disease; Nonprofit; Timelines
  3. The Final Word

    ELA: Biography; Retelling
    PHIL: Common Good; Helping; Heroes; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Health; Inventions
    SOC: 10 genOn; Health and Disease; Historical Biographies; Writing Historical Narratives
  4. Lending a Helping Hand

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Expository Text; Journaling; Research
    PHIL: Advocacy; Helping; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 10 genOn; Advocacy; Contemporary Issues; Core Democratic Values; Major World Regions; Nonprofit Organizations
6-8

Surviving Auschwitz (6-8)

This lesson focuses on two young Jewish survivors of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the Nazi death camp.  As they return to their home town and the concentration camp, they each tell their story and explain why they were willing to return to such an emotionally devastating place. Their story is replete with examples of heroism and concern for others in the face of unspeakable sorrow. 
  1. Surviving Auschwitz (6-8)

    ELA: Letter Writing; Retelling; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    PHIL: Family; Sacrifice
    SOC: Holocaust; Oral History; Surviving Auschwitz; Tolerance
6-8

Take a Breath Now

This unit will help learners become more knowledgeable about the effects of pollution on air quality, while encouraging them to be responsible citizens by becoming stewards of the Earth and clean air. This unit will stimulate awareness of how air quality affects our life.  Learners will develop their advocacy skills while presenting information about air quality and creating Public Service Announcements encouraging others to be good stewards of the Earth by helping clean up the pollutants in the air.

Focus Question: How can each person become involved in action and advocacy to address the issue of air quality?
 

  1. Is It Breathable?

    ELA: Letter Writing; Point of View
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Pollution
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Ethics; Individual Rights; Resources
  2. What's All the Fuss?

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Point of View
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Plan; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Air; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Ethics; Resources
  3. A Fast Cleanup

    ELA: Presentations; Research
    MAT: Classify; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Pollution
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Ethics; Resources
6-8

Take a Stand on Bullying

In this unit, students define bullying behavior and identify its effects on the individuals involved and the larger community. The students create a survey to collect and report on the perceived status of bullying at their school. Students learn about the different roles people take in the cycle of bullying. Rights and responsibilities of victims and bystanders form incentives for students to take action to build social capital and take action against bullying. The whole group carries out a plan and evaluates and presents the results of their action.

  1. Status of Bullying

    ELA: Media Genre; Presentations; Reflection; Survey
    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; School Climate; Social Justice
    SOC: Bullying; Community Capital; Individual Rights; School Community; Social Capital
  2. What Is My Role?

    ELA: Personal Response; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Benefits; Community; Courage; Empathy; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Social Capital; Social Justice
    SOC: Bullying; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Individual Rights; Rights/Responsibilities
  3. Communicating Our Plan

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Audience; Communicate; Electronic Text; Informational Media; Social/Cultural Issues; Technology; Visual Media
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Community; Empathy; Empower; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Bullying; Human Rights; School Community
6-8

Telling Our Stories of Giving

Students learn about and complete prewriting activities for three styles of writing: news stories, personal narratives, and persuasive essays. As they write and reflect, students increase their understanding of the impact of their philanthropy. They each write and publish one piece of writing as an act of advocacy to raise awareness of community needs and encourage active involvement in solutions. Stories may be published in print, weblog, podcast, or another form of media.

  1. Newspaper Stories

    ELA: Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Brainstorming; Communicate; Informational Media; Peer Review
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Giving; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Current Events; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Writing a Personal Narrative

    ELA: Communicate; Creative Writing; Main Idea; Narrative Writing; Reflection; Voice
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Advocacy; Common Good; Contribute; Fact/Opinion; Philanthropic Act; Reflection
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good
  3. Writing to Persuade

    ELA: Communicate; Graphic Organizer; Main Idea; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Benefits; Common Good; Fact/Opinion; Philanthropic Act; Reflection
    SOC: Advocacy; Common Good; Point of View
6-8

This Land Is Our Land - Flourish or Perish?

The purpose of this unit is to provide integrated learning using social studies and science concepts within the context of decision making regarding land use. Learners will understand that the well being of plants can be compared to the well being of our democracy since both depend on critical factors to determine whether they will flourish or perish. Subsequently, learners will have the opportunity to apply these concepts as they engage in decision making regarding private and public land use.

What are the critical factors to the well being of flowering plants and the well being of our democracy?

What are the consequences when we do not nurture plant life or do not nurture our democracy?

What are the considerations that influence our decisions regarding private and public land use?

  1. How Does My Government Grow?

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: History/Culture
    ELA: Expository Text; Social/Cultural Issues; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 5 genOn; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: 4 genOn; Core Democratic Values; Equality; Patriotism
  2. Plants - What Are Their Parts and Functions?

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Life Cycles; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Compare/Contrast
  3. With Liberty and Top Soil for All

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Experiment; Observation; Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Core Democratic Values
  4. Private Land Decision-Making

    PHIL: Common Good; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SCI: Land Management
    SOC: 4 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Land Use
  5. Making Decisions about Public Land

    ELA: Brainstorming; Presentations; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Common Good; Commons; Community; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Project
    SCI: Plants
    SOC: 4 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Land Use; Local Government; Maps
6-8

Through the Eyes of a Child

The purpose of the unit is to study stages of story development through fables and children’s literature. Students will read and analyze the story components in children’s picture stories. Students use this knowledge to write a story with a moral, and share their appreciation of good literature with younger children.
  1. Moral of the Story (The)

    ELA: Horton Hatches the Egg; Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch; Fable; Fiction Literature; Genre; Perception; Presentations; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Story Elements; Synthesizing; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Opportunity Costs; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
  2. On the Same Page

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Rainbow Fish (The); Yertle the Turtle; Perception; Response to Text/Others; Story Elements; Story Mapping; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Motivation for Giving
  3. Peace by Piece

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Be Good to Eddie Lee; Legend of the Bluebonnet (The); Peer Review; Response to Text/Others; Story Mapping; Writing Process
    PHIL: Civil Society
  4. Sharing Talents

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Chair For My Mother (A); Audience; Constructing Meaning; Presentations; Questioning; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork; Technology; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Service Project
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue
  5. Hidden Treasures

    ART: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Audience; Media Genres; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Teamwork; Technology; Vocabulary; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Corporate Philanthropy; Service Plan; Volunteer
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue
6-8

Truth, Trash and Treasure

Learners will examine the rights and responsibilities inherent in our democratic system of government by studying historical documents and the words of some famous American leaders. They will discuss the meaning of civic virtue and decide on their own role as responsible citizens. Through the use of literature, video and music, learners will reflect on what they themselves can do to make a difference in the world and to be responsible citizens. They will carry out a philanthropic service-learning project, cleaning up a local park. Their learning, readings and experiences will result in a reflective, five-paragraph essay. Finally, the learners will create a concrete, visual reflection of their learning and experience in the form of a mixed-media collage and a poem.

Focus questions:

    • How do people in a democratic state use their rights to be responsible citizens by practicing the idea of civic virtue?
    • Can a young person truly make a difference in our world?
    • What words and images can express the learner’s emotional response to the service-learning project?
    • How do these words and images reflect the learner’s role and value as a responsible citizen?
  1. Truth (The)

    ELA: Pay it Forward; Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Personal Response; Questioning; Response to Text/Others; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Civil Society; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Recycling; Volunteer
    SOC: Kennedy, John F.; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Democracy; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Trash or Treasure?

    ART: Music
    ELA: “Dare You To Move”; “Legacy”; Pay it Forward; Power of One; Analyze/Interpret; Expository Writing; Fiction Literature; Group Discussions; Peer Review; Personal Response; Questioning; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Self-Assessment; Writing Process
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Common Good; Community; Philanthropic Act; Service Project
    SOC: 4 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Environment; Volunteerism
  3. From Trash to Treasure

    ART: Homage to Chief Seattle; Rainbow; Trade (Gifts for Trading Land With White People); Visual Arts
    ELA: Creative Writing; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Personal Response; Poetry; Point of View; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Symbols/Images/Sounds; Visual Media
    PHIL: Power of One; Civil Society; Native Americans; Need; Respect
    SOC: Chief Seattle; Common Good; Cultures; Environment; Native Peoples; Pollution
6-8

Tulipmania – Growing Flowers to Share

Learners will recognize the structural characteristics of bulbs, corms and rhizomes. They will describe acts of philanthropy and analyze why people give to others of their time, talent and treasure. The learners will reinforce their knowledge about plant growth by planting and caring for bulbs. The resulting potted flower will be a gift that the learner will share. By identifying local service organizations, learners will increase their understanding of local service organizations and participate in the process of matching resources to community needs.
  1. Structure and Function of Bulbs, Corms and Rhizomes

    ELA: Presentations
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Compare/Contrast; Diagram; Energy; Food; Plants
    SOC: 2 genOn; 4 genOn
  2. Who Will Benefit if We Give Bulbs What They Need to Grow?

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Journaling; Letter Writing
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act
    SCI: Energy; Plants; Water
    SOC: 2 genOn; 4 genOn; Economics; Goods and Services; Maps; Nonprofit; Voting
6-8

Us vs. Them

Learners will understand that others feel excluded by actual and implied barriers from groups to which others belong. They will describe why fears and prejudices develop between groups and learn ways to overcome the barriers between groups. Learners will discover that those who contribute to the common good are philanthropists and find out about persons in history who gave of their time, talent and treasure for the sake of others.

They will ask and discuss questions such as:

  • Does belonging to a group ever become unhealthy?
  • Do the labels we put on other people cause us to isolate ourselves?
  • How do I feel if I break the barriers between myself and people in other groups?
  1. I Belong, But Why Don't You?

    ELA: Stereotyping/Bias
    PHIL: Discrimination; Friendship; Respect; Sensitivity; Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; 6 genOn; Discrimination; Tolerance
  2. We Can Work It Out

    ELA: Literary Response; Point of View; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Social/Cultural Issues; Theme
    PHIL: Community; Conflict Resolution; Discrimination; Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; 6 genOn
  3. People Who Made a Difference

    ELA: Biography; Historical Fiction; Stereotyping/Bias
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 6 genOn; Equality; Historical Biographies; Slavery
  4. Refugees and Children in Our World

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Informational Media; Journaling; Reflection; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Global Community; Homelessness
    SOC: 1 genOn; 6 genOn; Convention on the Rights of the Child; Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural; Emigration; Human Rights; Internally Displaced Persons; Nonprofit; Universal Declaration of Human Rights
6-8

Wall of Philanthropists (7th Grade)

Using historical persons, this lesson will emphasize the importance of working for the principles of justice, tolerance and equality to promote civil society. Students will explore the impact of historical figures who have influenced society through their philanthropic actions for the common good.

  1. Wall of Philanthropists (7th Grade)

    ELA: Biography; Expository Text; Graphic Organizer; Research; Technology
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Common Good; Giving; Helping; Heroes; Human Rights; Kindness; Selflessness; Sharing; Social Justice
    SOC: Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Justice; Personal Virtue; Social Action; Tolerance
6-8

Water Resources and the Role of the Independent Sector

Water is an essential element for life on earth. We are constantly using and reusing the water we have and have a responsibility to preserve its quality. This unit directs students to study water conservation issues and to understand the role government(s), business and industry, the independent and family sectors play in preserving our water resources. The purpose of this unit is to enable students to distinguish between the roles of government, business, and the private sector in preserving our water resources.

  1. Where Has All the Water Gone?

    PHIL: Common Good; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Environment; Inquiry; Scarcity; Water
  2. What Have We Done?

    PHIL: Commons; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Adaptation; Ecosystems; Environment
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Adaptation; Aswan Dam; Colorado River Basin; Compare/Contrast; Ecosystems; Environment; Geography; Government; Industry; Natural Resources
  3. Sectors? What Sectors?

    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Adaptation; Analyze/Interpret; Economics; Environment; Natural Resources; Water
  4. What Shall We Do? What Shall We Do?

    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Plan; Social Action; Stewardship
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Adaptation; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Economics; Environment; Natural Resources; Public Policy; Water
6-8

Watershed S.O.S. (Saving Our Sources) 6-8

This unit includes lessons about the water cycle, how the watershed works, pollutants of the watershed, uses of water and water as a nonrenewable resource. The unit is interdisciplinary with science, English, social studies and philanthropic components.  Scientific experiments and demonstrations are included in the lessons. Students take action through the political process by contacting local governmental agencies (DNR, contact state or U.S. Representatives) or by writing letters to the editor of a local newspaper concerning protecting their watershed.  

  1. Water Is Cool! (6-8)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Leadership; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Cycles; Environment; Evaporation; Matter; Natural Resources; Water
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Core Democratic Values
  2. What Is a Watershed? (6-8)

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Narrative Writing; Style
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Models
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Need; Stewardship
    SCI: Land Management; Natural Resources; Water
    SOC: Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Geography; Maps
  3. Poseidon's Protectors to the Rescue (6-8)

    ELA: Usborne Illustrated Guide to Greek Myths & Legends; Communicate; Journaling; Letter Writing; Listening; Myths; Persuasive Techniques; Retelling
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Need; Stewardship
    SCI: Natural Resources; Water
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Environment; Natural Characteristics of Place; Resources
6-8

Water--Where Has It Gone? (6th Grade)

  1. Water--Where Has It Gone? (6th Grade)

    ELA: Literature; Research
    PHIL: 3 lesson genOn; 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropic Act; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Graphs/Charts/Tables; Water
    SOC: Advocacy; Natural Resources; Scarcity
6-8

We Are Divine Creations (Tolerance) (Private-Religious)

This unit focuses on the texts that deal with the creation of humanity, b’tzelem elohim (in the Divine image) and the commandment to love one’s neighbor as oneself. Students create commentary on the texts, learn about organizations that fulfill the Rambam’s concept of loving, and create a project that provides support to such an organization. The learners will grow in their understanding and be able to demonstrate faith-based responses to the question, How we are to treat one another and why we are expected to do so?
  1. You and Me and God Make Three! (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Ethics; Group Discussions; Interview; Questioning; Voice
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Altruism; Caring/Sharing; Community; Family; Helping; Judaism; Kindness; Respect; Tolerance; Tradition
    SOC: Discrimination; Parochial
  2. The Work of our (Divine) Hands (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Ethics; Group Discussions; Interview; Questioning; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Voice
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Altruism; Caring/Sharing; Community; Family; Helping; Judaism; Kindness; Respect; Tolerance; Tradition
    SOC: Discrimination; Parochial
  3. Our Works Can Be Divine (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Presentation; Research
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Altruism; Caring/Sharing; Community; Family; Helping; Judaism; Kindness; Respect; Service Plan; Service Project; Tolerance; Tradition
    SOC: Discrimination; Parochial
6-8

We Are Guardians of the Earth (Stewardship) (Private-Religious)

We are told to fill the earth and master it. (Genesis 1:28) How we understand and internalize the concept of ‘mastery’ determines the course of our lives, our impact on the people we influence and, ultimately, the fate of the planet.

Focus Questions:
How does G-d define success?
What does G-d expect of us?
What does G-d expect of me? And, how can I do it?

  1. Learning to Master: Some Ideas from Tradition (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Ethics; Family; Judaism; Religious Perspectives; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Parochial; Wants/Needs
  2. Our Ethics Show: Learning to Master (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Paraphrase; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Enlightened Self-Interest; Ethics; Judaism; Religious Perspectives
    SOC: Advocacy; Parochial; Values
  3. Models of Mastery (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Influence; Retell; Summarize; Voice
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Judaism; Leadership; Religious Perspectives; Tradition
    SOC: Common Good; Decision Making Model; Economics; Parochial; Point of View; Religious Perspectives; Rights/Responsibilities; Values
6-8

We Are One World

The purpose of this unit is to raise awareness of stereotypes, forms of bias and discrimination faced by peers and others every day. The denial of basic rights to people all over the world will also be addressed with students learning about life in other countries.
  1. Stereo What?

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Discrimination; Reflection
  2. Violations and Dreams

    ELA: Research; Technology
    PHIL: Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Cultures; Discrimination; Freedom; Human Characteristics of Place; Human Rights; Inquiry; Maps; Natural Characteristics of Place; Primary/Secondary Sources
  3. What's the Difference?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Research; Speaking; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Human Rights; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 1 genOn; Adaptation; Communities; Cultures; Gross Domestic Product; Primary/Secondary Sources
  4. Freedoms We Enjoy

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Research; Speaking; Survey; Synthesizing; Technology; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organizations; Service Plan
    SOC: 1 genOn; Human Rights
6-8

We Are Partners in the Work of Creation (Tikkun Olam) (Private-Religious)

This unit provides learners with a traditional Jewish textual framework as well as a look at some contemporary work in the performance of tikun olam- the repair of the world. It also provides learners with an opportunity to plan a personal mitzvah project/”service plan”.

Focus Questions:
What is the relationship between G-d and humanity?
What does G-d expect of us?
For what are individuals responsible?
How can I demonstrate my responsibility through action?

  1. To Repair the World: Why? (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Ethics; Family; Helping; Judaism; Stewardship; Values
    SOC: Parochial; Religious Perspective; Rules; Traditions
  2. To Repair the World: How? (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Ethics; Family; Judaism; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Parochial; Religious Perspective; Rules; Traditions; Values
  3. To Repair the World: Methods and Me (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Ethics; Family; Fundraising; Heroes; Judaism; Religious Perspectives; Service Plan; Service Project; Sharing; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Common Good; Parochial; Traditions; Values
6-8

We ARE the Government

Learners look at primary documents of the Constitution and Declaration of Independence to gain a sense of the purpose, motivations, and people of the founding documents. Through viewing, reading, quotations, and discussion, students explore the meaning of democracy and responsible citizenship. Students explore the impact of service and volunteerism in our democratic history. They write a personal statement of responsible citizenship and create a group presentation about the importance of taking action for the common good as democratic citizens. The demonstration will include writing and technology to communicate personal statements of advocacy as it relates to their roles as citizens.

Focus Question: What is our democratic responsibility for volunteering and serving for the common good?

  1. Government by the People

    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Electronic Text; Journaling; Knight scholarship; Reading; Retelling; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 5 genOn; 9/11genOn; Advocacy; Civil Society; Common Good; Leadership; Responsibility
    SOC: Amendments to Constitution; Bill of Rights; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Constitution; Declaration of Independence; Democracy; Government; Preamble to Constitution; Primary/Secondary Sources; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. What Is Democracy?

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Knight scholarship; Listening; Main Idea; Reading; Reflection; Retelling; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Civil Society; Common Good; Giving; Responsibility; Service
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Democracy; Democratic Values; Government; Rights/Responsibilities; Volunteerism
  3. My Civic Responsibility

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Brainstorming; Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Creative Writing; Knight scholarship; Main Idea; Peer Review; Presentations; Reflection; Teamwork; Viewing; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Civil Society; Common Good; Empower; Leadership; Reflection; Responsibility; Service
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Common Good; Democracy; Government; Rights/Responsibilities; Volunteerism
6-8

We are the Positive School Culture

A positive school climate is made up of people making choices about how to act and treat one another. Students survey the school population to identify what is going well and what needs improvement. Based on the results of the survey, the students design a service plan and make mascots using the engineering design method. The students carry out their service plan to promote a positive school climate, then reflect on its impact and demonstrate their service-learning process.

  1. Social Contract for Our School

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Peer Review; Social/Cultural Issues; Survey
    PHIL: Character; Needs Assessment; Social Contract
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Climate; Common Good
  2. Addressing the School Community Needs

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Cause/Effect; Character Development; Persuasive Techniques; Poetry; Presentations; Symbols/Images/Sounds; Visual Media
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Character; Community; Problem Solving; Pro-Social Behavior
    SCI: Technology
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Economics
  3. We Are All Better Off

    ART: Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Communicate; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Reflection
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Advocacy; Character; Community; Philanthropic Act; Reflection; Social Action
6-8

We Need Each Other (6th Grade)

This lesson will develop the students' awareness of the issue of homelessness in the community.  With a better understanding of their community's issues/problems, in this case "homelessness", students will be able to more effectively and efficiently determine their role in addressing community needs.

  1. We Need Each Other (6th Grade)

    PHIL: 5 lesson genOn; Community; Empathy; Homelessness; Need
    SOC: Communities
6-8

Welcome Home

Students develop understanding of the meaning of philanthropy and how it relates to them and the needs in their community. They create a photo journal presentation/poster showing the needs in their community. The students gain a background understanding of Habitat for Humanity as both a global and local organization. As advocates, they raise awareness of the issue of poverty and affordable housing in their community. Students compare costs of housing materials and learn about nonprofits. They plan a service project that addresses a need in their community.
 

  1. What Is a Home?

    ELA: Communicate; Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Interview; Journaling; Presentations; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Commons; Community; Homelessness; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Neighborhood; Reflection
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Diverse Communities; Diversity; Economics; Research; Resources
  2. Advocate for a Home

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Author's Style/Purpose; Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Presentations; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Technology; Visual Media
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Community; Problem Solving; Service
    SOC: Communities; Contemporary Issues; Cooperative Groups; Research; Social Action
  3. Restoring Home

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Journaling; Resources; Visual Media
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Problem Solving; Spreadsheet/Data Base
    PHIL: Advocacy; Civil Society; Donate; Homelessness; Philanthropic Organizations
    SOC: Civil Society; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Cooperative Groups; Costs; Economics
6-8

Welcome to Our School—A Transition from Elementary to Middle School

Students will become empowered as members of their school community as they act as ambassadors to the fifth graders coming into their school. They will be ambassadors in two ways: by writing personal letters and through a movie created to welcome the fifth graders into the middle school. At the end of the unit they will reflect on the power of volunteerism on the economy and spirit of a community.
  1. My Part in the School Community

    ELA: Brainstorming; Interview; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Contribute; Cooperate; Empathy; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Communities; School Community
  2. Dear Fifth Grader

    ELA: Audience; Letter Writing; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Self Assessment; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Need; Reflection; Sensitivity; Time/Talent/Treasure
  3. Roll the Tape!

    ELA: Interview; Media Genres; Technology; Writing Process
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Motivation for Giving; Need; Service Project
  4. Reflecting on the Power of Volunteerism

    ART: Theater: Perform
    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Audience; Influence; Point of View; Presentations; Role-Play; Teamwork
    MAT: Multiplication
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Contribute; Giving; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
6-8

Wellspring—An Intergenerational Historical Writing Project (The)

Preserving local history through writing; giving students the opportunity to interact with older citizens, to share and record their stories, to discover the wealth of history in the town, and to develop in students pride and a sense of connection to the community.

  1. What Is a Community? What Makes Our Community Unique?

    ELA: Interview; Listening; Research; Speaking
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Community; Social Capital
  2. Preserving History

    ELA: House on Mango Street (The); I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings; Lake Wobegon Days; Living Up the Street; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Literature; Reading; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Theme
    PHIL: Community; Family; Respect
  3. Reaching Out to the Community—Beyond

    ELA: Letter Writing; Research; Thesis; Visual Media
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Service Project; Social Capital; Volunteer
  4. Independent Project Selection

    ELA: Interview; Peer Review; Research; Self Assessment; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Community; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Community Capital; Human Capital; Inquiry
  5. Putting It All Together

    ELA: Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Research; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Reflection; Service Project
6-8

What Does It Take?

Students will define and recognize people who have made a difference through heroic actions.
  1. Heroes

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Altruism; Egoism; Enlightened Self-Interest; Heroes; Personal Virtue; Self Interest
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Values
  2. Historic Heroes

    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Presentations; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Heroes
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Common Good; Expansion (1801-1861); Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Research; Revolution/Nationhood (1754-1820); Values
  3. Heroes with Heart

    ELA: Research; Technology; Vocabulary
    PHIL: African American; Heroes; Hispanics
    SOC: Anthony, Susan B.; Carver, George Washington; Chávez, César; Douglass, Frederick; King, Jr., Martin Luther; Parks, Rosa; Truth, Sojourner; Tubman, Harriet; Washington, Booker T.; Wright, Fanny; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Common Good; Good Character; Inquiry; Minorities; Personal Virtue; Research; Values
  4. Are There Any Heroes Out There?

    ELA: Audience; Journaling; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Community; Volunteer
    SOC: Branches of Government; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Common Good; Contemporary Issues; Cultures; Democratic Values; Elections; Ethics; Representative Democracy
  5. Making A Difference

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Altruism; Egoism; Enlightened Self-Interest; Service Learning
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Common Good; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Personal Virtue
6-8

What Will You Bring to the Table? (6-8)

In response to an activity involving unfair distribution of food, students explore what can be done to address the issue of child hunger in the United States. They conduct an investigation of hunger in the local community. Students join with a nonprofit organization and take action to address the issue of child hunger using the theme of "What Will You Bring to the Table?"

Focus Question: What is our responsibility to take action for the sake of children who are hungry?

  1. Why Are People Hungry?

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas; Key Ideas and Details; Reading Informational Text; Reflection; Teamwork
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Community; Global Community; Hunger; Justice; Needs Assessment; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 11 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Developing Countries; Economics; Global Issues; Research; Scarcity
6-8

Where's The Sand?

The purpose of this unit is to introduce learners to the regions of the Earth that are considered deserts. They will explore why it is important to be good stewards of the land both world wide and locally. Learners will “adopt” an area around the school or community and take care of that area. The learners will practice stewardship of the land by adopting a public/common area in their community to care for.


Focus question: How are civic responsibility and the care of public lands related?
 

  1. One Grain at a Time

    ELA: Writing Process
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship
    SCI: Ecology; Ecosystems; Heat; Plants
    SOC: Cultural Regions; Location; Major World Regions
  2. Hot, Dry; Cold, Dry

    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship
    SCI: Adaptation
    SOC: Environment; Geography
  3. Who Lives Here?

    ELA: Desert Scrapbook: Dawn to Dusk in the Sonoran Desert (A); Brainstorming; Graphic Organizer; Presentations; Teamwork
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Research
  4. Taking Care of Business

    ELA: Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Listening; Presentations; Reflection; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Needs Assessment; Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Research
6-8

Who Will Care for the Water? (7th Grade)

The purpose of this lesson is to explore the meaning of, and responsibility for, stewardship of natural resources. Students will investigate the effects, expected and unexpected, of human intervention on ecosystems involving water resources.

  1. Who Will Care for the Water? (7th Grade)

    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Commons; Environmental Stewardship; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Adaptation; Ecosystems; Environment
    SOC: Aswan Dam; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Colorado River Basin; Compare/Contrast; Geography; Government; Industry; Natural Resources
6-8

Women of the Industrial Era

These lessons will increase the students' knowledge of the era of the Industrial Revolution and its impact on women. Four women were selected to represent the contributions of 19th century women toward social services: Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Clara Barton. At the conclusion of the unit, the students will organize a blood drive in the school in conjunction with the American Red Cross.

  1. Industrial Revolution and Women (The)

    ELA: Inquiry; Research; Technology
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 5 genOn
    SOC: Fulton, Robert; Lowell, Francis Cabot; Whitney, Eli; Distribution; Family; Goods and Services; Historical Biographies; Human Capital; Industrialization (1800-1900); Inquiry; Production/Producer; Research; Technology
  2. Sojourner Truth, African-American Woman of the 19th Century

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Language/Style; Predicting; Speaking
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 5 genOn; Common Good; Human Rights; Minorities; Philanthropic Act; Respect; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Truth, Sojourner; 2 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Chronology; Discrimination; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Minorities; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Slavery
  3. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Suffragist

    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Research
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 5 genOn; Common Good; Human Rights; Philanthropic Act; Respect
    SOC: Anthony, Susan B.; Mott, Lucretia; Stanton, Elizabeth Cady; Truth, Sojourner; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Declaration of Independence; Discrimination; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Industrialization (1800-1900); Minorities; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Research; Slavery
  4. Susan B. Anthony, Activist

    ART: Common Good; Human Rights; Philanthropic Act; Respect
    ELA: Presentations; Research
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 5 genOn
    SOC: Anthony, Susan B.; Discrimination; Elections; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Research; Voting
  5. Clara Barton to the Rescue

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Listening; Research; Symbols/Images/Sounds
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 5 genOn; Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Volunteer
    SOC: Anthony, Susan B.; Barton, Clara; Stanton, Elizabeth Cady; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Virtue; Political Reform; Red Cross; Volunteer
6-8

Worthless to Priceless: It's all Relative

In this unit students explore the message of the South Asian Indian folktale "The Drum." In the folktale, a child shows repeated compassion when he recognizes the needs of others and shares his meager "capital." In this cross-curricular unit, the students rewrite the story as a ten-minute play; explore the economic concepts of capital, bartering, and goods and services; create a Public Service Announcement; explore how items can have little value to one person and great value to another; graph data; and design and carry out a service-learning project in which they share their capital with someone who will value it. As a final demonstration, students present their unit work with their peers, families, and the community. This unit covers several weeks. Many of the lessons can stand alone as a unit.

Focus Question: What different types of capital do we have that can be used to serve the common good?

  1. Giving to Get the Beat

    ELA: Drum (The); Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Character Development; Compare/Contrast; Folktales; Main Idea; Point of View; Presentations; Production Elements; Retelling; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Need; Philanthropic Act; Selflessness
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Cooperative Groups; Good Character
  2. Show Me NO Money

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Drum (The); Brainstorming; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Creative Writing; Informational Media; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Retelling; Teamwork; Viewing; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Selflessness; Social Action; Social Capital
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Capital; Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community Capital; Compare/Contrast; Currency; Economics; Good Character; Goods and Services; Human Capital
  3. Graphing the Value

    ELA: Drum (The); Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Research; Teamwork
    MAT: Box Plots; Comparing Numbers; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Mean/Median/Mode/Range
    PHIL: Donate; Motivation for Giving; Social Capital
    SOC: Capital; Choices/Consequences; Costs; Economics; Wants/Needs
  4. Worthless to Me, Priceless to You

    ELA: Drum (The); Read n' Give; Brainstorming; Character Development; Concept Mapping; Creative Writing; Folktales; Group Discussions; Journaling; Research; Teamwork
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Book Drive; Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Service Plan; Social Capital
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Community Capital; Conflict Resolution; Goods and Services; Point of View; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs
  5. And the Beat Goes On . . .

    ART: Perform; Theater; Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Folktales; Informational Media; Presentations; Retelling; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Empathy; Global Community; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Social Action
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good
6-8

You Light up My Life

The purpose of this unit is to expose learners to different types of energy sources that produce electricity. They will show how electricity is used, measured, recorded and calculated while exploring how basic energy conservation and energy efficiency choices can impact their family energy costs and reduce the amount of energy consumption.This unit will allow the learners to explore local governments and how to develop an action plan for a city to use alternative energy resources. Learners create a presentation as a form of advocacy.

Focus Question: Who in a community is responsibility for protecting the resources of the community?  Is it the elected officials, the individual, or both?
 

  
 

  1. You Light Up My House

    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Problem Solving; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Data Collection/Organization; Electricity; Energy; Environment; Measure; Natural Resources
  2. Lights Light Up My Life

    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Problem Solving; Responsibility; Stewardship
    SCI: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Data Collection/Organization; Electricity; Energy; Measure; Observation
    SOC: Environment; Resources
  3. Light Up Someone's Life with Knowledge

    ELA: Research; Resources; Speaking
    PHIL: Common Good; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Problem Solving; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Natural Resources
    SOC: Resource Allocation; Simulation
6-8
Unit Title & Purpose Lesson Titles & Key Words Grades

"We the People..." Project

A unit designed to enhance the student's understanding of the role that philanthropy plays in our society in conjunction with our system of Government.

  1. Philanthropy of the Founding Fathers—Alive and Well Today?

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques
    PHIL: Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Public Policy; Social Action; Values
  2. Introduction of the "We the People..." Project and Volunteer Survey

    PHIL: Community; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Debate; Public Policy; Survey; Teamwork
  3. Identifying Career Interests in the Volunteer and Government Sectors

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteer
    SOC: 10 genOn; Business; Government; Inquiry; Research
9-12

"I" on Philanthropy

Students will create a resource for the school library that lists information about the non-profit agencies and philanthropic opportunities in their own community. They will use interviewing techniques in order to create this resource. Students will reflect on the concept of philanthropic involvement shaping self-identity.
  1. Connecting Philanthropy and Identity through Children's Literature and Song

    ELA: Giving Tree (The); Brainstorming; Fiction Literature; Listening
    PHIL: Character; Community; Self Interest; Selflessness; Volunteer
    SOC: Nonprofit Organizations
  2. Academic Service Learning: Creating the Philanthropy Resource

    ELA: Interview; Questioning; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Donate; Service Learning
  3. Reflection on Philanthropy and Self Concept

    ART: Theater: Perform; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Fact/Opinion; Presentations; Reflection; Synthesizing
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Reflection
9-12

Action through Art

The learners will read stories, written and illustrated by teens, about action and advocacy to make the world a better place. They will list concerns/issues they have about their school or local community. They will create story outlines about action and advocacy taken by people in extraordinary ways to address some of the issues/concerns.

  1. Action through Art

    ELA: Brainstorming; Reading; Story Mapping; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Art from the Heart; Heroes
    SOC: Civil Society
9-12

Addressing Poverty (9th Grade)

The learners will analyze why nonprofit organizations are needed, especially when there are for-profit and governmental institutions which do some of the similar work. They will investigate a local nonprofit that works to alleviate poverty in the community and describe the importance of philanthropy in the community.

  1. Addressing Poverty

    ELA: Informational Genre; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; Caring/Sharing; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Community; Homelessness; Poverty; Responsibility; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 6 genOn; Contemporary Issues; Economics; For-Profit; Goods and Services; Government; Nonprofit; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs
9-12

Advocacy-Getting the Job Done

In this unit the learners will develop a definition of advocacy. They will become familiar with what motivates people to become advocates as well as identify and evaluate some of the strategies advocates use to promote their cause or the cause of others. They will identify and research local, state, and/or national concerns for humane treatment and animal welfare that call for advocacy intervention and determine what a successful intervention strategy might look like. They will include these strategies in a plan to address their identified local, state, and/or national concern for animal welfare (or another cause of their choice) as well as identify ways to encourage others to take up the cause(s). This unit focuses on humane treatment and animal welfare to teach advocacy skills.

  1. Understanding Advocacy

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Interview; Letter Writing; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Humanitarian; Kindness; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Service Project; Stewardship; Values
    SCI: Animals; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Ecosystems; Ethics; Nature
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues; Environment; Ideals/Reality; Nonprofit; Opportunity Costs; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action
  2. Understanding Effectiveness

    ELA: Biography; Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Humanitarian; Kindness; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Values
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues; Environment; Ideals/Reality; Nonprofit; Opportunity Costs; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action
  3. “Getting our Paws into the Cause”

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Peer Review; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Caring/Sharing; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Humanitarian; Kindness; Nonprofit Organizations; Respect; Responsibility; Sensitivity; Service Project; Stewardship; Values
    SCI: Animals; Conservation; Critical Thinking; Ecosystems; Ethics; Nature
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues; Environment; Ideals/Reality; Nonprofit Organizations; Opportunity Costs; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities; Social Action
9-12

Affirmative Action

In this unit, students explore the history of Affirmative Action in the United States from Plessy v. Ferguson 1869 to the present. The class uses the Internet to read primary source documents from Plessy, Brown v. Board of Education 1954 and United Steelworkers v. Weber 1979. The class views documentary footage from the PBS series Eyes on the Prize and answers questions from that video on the Little Rock Central High School desegregation in 1957. Students explore recent Affirmative Action cases, then participate in a "mock" Affirmative Action Supreme Court case. Throughout the unit, students relate Core Democratic Values to the different aspects of Affirmative Action. Students finish the unit by writing a column on Affirmative Action for the school or local newspaper.

  1. Order In The Court

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Media Genres; Research; Technology; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Fact/Opinion; Minorities; Philanthropic Act; Social Action
    SOC: Brown v. Board of Education; Plessy v. Ferguson; 1 genOn; Advocacy; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Discrimination; Economics; Government; Human Rights; Inquiry; Marshall, Thurgood; NAACP; Nonprofit; Persecution; Research; Supreme Court
  2. Little Rock, 1957

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fact/Opinion; Inquiry; Media Genres; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Fact/Opinion; Freedom; Minorities; Social Capital; Social Justice
    SOC: Brown v. Board of Education; 1 genOn; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Desegregation; Discrimination; Diversity; Equality; Government; Human Rights; Persecution; Supreme Court
  3. Affirmative Action At Work

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fact/Opinion; Inquiry; Media Genres; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Fact/Opinion; Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Steelworkers v. Weber; 1 genOn; 2 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Declaration of Independence; Discrimination; Government; Human Rights; Persecution; Supreme Court
  4. Court So Orders (The )

    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Writing; Informational Media; Inquiry; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Research; Role-Play; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Fact/Opinion; Minorities; Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 1 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Compare/Contrast; Constitution of the United States; Declaration of Independence; Government; Rule of Law; Supreme Court
9-12

Air Pollution and Asthma (11th Grade)

  1. Air Pollution and Asthma (11th Grade)

    ELA: Informational Media; Prior Knowledge; Research; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Cause/Effect; Health; Pollution
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Environment; Health and Disease; Pollution
9-12

Air Today, Air Tomorrow

This unit will provide learning opportunities that allow students to interact with sources and individuals who have knowledge about the effects of air pollution while determining what role each has played.  Additionally, it will allow learners to develop and implement a plan for distributing radon and carbon monoxide detectors to senior citizens and families in need, developing skills for becoming good stewards of the Earth. It will introduce the learners to the idea that Air Quality is an important environmental issue and that they have the power to affect change.
Focus Question: In which ways can you heighten individual and community awareness about the issues posed by the condition of poor air quality?
 

  1. Take a Deep Breath

    ELA: Letter Writing; Point of View
    MAT: Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Community; Environmental Stewardship; Human Rights; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Responsibility; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Ethics; Pollution; Resources
  2. Start Cleaning the Air

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Point of View
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Service Plan; Service Project; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure; Volunteer
    SCI: Air; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Communities; Environment; Ethics; Resources
  3. It's Never Too Late

    ELA: Research
    PHIL: Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Air; Environment; Pollution
    SOC: Career Opportunities; Communities; Environment; Ethics; Resources
9-12

All for One

Learners will define and identify stereotypical and discriminatory behaviors. They will analyze the harmful effects of discrimination on our society and give examples of the ways individuals have responded to violations of human dignity. They will describe a social action plan to make the school a welcome and secure learning environment for all learners.

How do the actions of one individual or group impact the well-being of others within the community?

  1. Don't Laugh at Me

    ELA: Journaling; Listening; Reading
    PHIL: Empathy; Reflection; Tolerance
    SOC: Yarrow, Peter; 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Diversity; Equality
  2. Living Together as One

    ELA: Journaling; Media Genres; Reflection; Universal Themes; Viewing
    PHIL: Discrimination; Human Rights
    SOC: 1 genOn; Bill of Rights; Discrimination; Diversity
  3. Who's In, Who's Out?

    ELA: Journaling; Survey
    PHIL: Community; Diversity
    SOC: 1 genOn; Communities; Diversity
  4. Allies and Actions

    ELA: Journaling; Presentations; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Minorities; Respect
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Diversity; School Community
  5. We Can Help to Make a Change!

    ART: Presentations
    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-T: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Presentations
    PHIL: Advocacy; School Climate; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Advocacy; School Community
9-12

Art as Advocacy

The learners will view works of art that advocate for social change. They will recognize that art can influence social change. The learners will select an issue of human rights and create a work of art that represents the issue. They will write a paragraph of explanation about their work.

  1. Art as Advocacy

    ELA: Media Genres; Prior Knowledge
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Common Good; Hispanics; Human Rights; Philanthropic Act
    SOC: Chávez, César; Huerta, Dolores; Good Character; Human Rights
9-12

Attributes of a Civil Society (9th Grade)

Learners will define justice, kindness, peace and tolerance. They will recognize these as attributes of a civil society. They will look for examples of their presence or absence in the news media and will brainstorm how they can promote them in their school, community and the world.

  1. Attributes of a Civil Society (9th Grade)

    ELA: Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Kindness; Tolerance
    SOC: Democratic Values; Justice
9-12

Be the Change: Core Values

Students explore how their core values and identity contribute to citizenship and leadership. Students engage in a variety of activities that enable them to explore their identity and the responsibilities of citizenship. They explore and demonstrate leadership and service qualities, reflect on the qualities of a leader and create and donate a children's book.

  1. Building Identity

    ELA: Concept Mapping; Constructing Meaning; Creative Writing; Poetry
    PHIL: Community; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Cultures
  2. Building a Community: Responsibility and Leadership

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Creative Writing; Journaling; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Community; Helping; Need; Social Action
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities
  3. Leadership and Service

    ELA: Audience; Author's Style/Purpose; Creative Writing; Narrative Writing; Research
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities
9-12

Be the Change: Democracy

Students engage in activities that illustrate the importance of every person contributing his or her voice in a democratic community/society. They explore the connection between rights, laws, and voting in a democracy. They learn about their local government structure and visit a public office to collect data through interviews and observations. Students create a final project tying together their knowledge of voting, rights, laws, and public office.

  1. The Power of One

    ELA: Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Benefits; Justice
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civil Rights; Democratic Values; Voting
  2. Get Up, Stand Up

    PHIL: Advocacy; Community
    SOC: Be the Change; Branches of Government; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Democracy; Government; Laws; Representative Democracy
  3. E Pluribus Unum

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Communicate; Creative Writing; Symbols/Images/Sounds; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Social Action
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; democratic Values; Government; Laws; Local Government; Voting
9-12

Be the Change: Environment

In this unit, students explore environmental issues of litter and water and land resources in different environments. After exploring each issue, they discuss ways to take social action to raise awareness of environmental stewardship. In Lesson One, students read about and discuss issues related to pollution, waste management, and recycling. In Lesson Two, students explore the issues of  water availability in the world and water contaminants. They advocate for protecting the water supply and conserving water. In Lesson Three, students identify key aspects of urban ecosystems and explore the concept of environmental justice locally and globally.

  1. Trash Talk

    ELA: Letter Writing
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Global Community; Neighborhood; Service
    SCI: Environment; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Pollution
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Interdependence
  2. What Are You Drinking?

    ELA: Communicate; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: 3 genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Global Community
    SCI: Analyze; Compare/Contrast; Conservation; Water
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities; Geography; Resource Allocation; Resources
  3. Good in the Hood

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Community; Justice; Neighborhood; Social Action
    SCI: Environment; Garden; Land Management; Natural Resources
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Compare/Contrast; Environment; Resource Allocation; Resources; Urbanization
9-12

Be the Change: Global Health

In this unit that provides examples of philanthropic opportunities to help others for the common good, students learn about three global health issues and take local action to address the issues. Each lesson may stand alone to focus on a single issue: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Hunger, or Malaria. In Lesson One, students research the names, causes, and symptoms of common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). They identify resources someone can turn to for help with STDs and propose and carry out a plan to teach others about STDs. In Lesson Two, students define hunger and explore the myths and facts about the issue of global hunger. They brainstorm actions they can take to reduce the effects of hunger on others in their community and around the world. Students write poems to represent their thinking about the problem of hunger. In Lesson Three, students learn facts about the global threat of malaria and methods for fighting its spread. Students learn one way they can take action against malaria through fundraising to purchase insecticide-treated bed nets.

  1. Prevention of STDs

    ELA: Communicate; Persuasive Techniques; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Advocacy; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Pro-Social Behavior
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Be the Change; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Contemporary Issues
  2. Hunger: Facts and Responses

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Communicate; Electronic Text; Poetry; Presentations; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: Advocacy; Service
    SOC: Be the Change; Cause/Effect; Geography; Global Issues
  3. Malaria

    ELA: Communication; Interview; Personal Response
    PHIL: Poverty; Service; Social Action
    SCI: Health; Malaria
    SOC: Be the Change; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Global Issues
9-12

Be the Change: Homelessness

In this unit, students learn about the issue of homelessness and take action to address the issue. Students examine their preconceptions about homelessness. Students build on their understanding about homelessness, seeking to discover the actual facts and statistics about homelessness locally and nationally. Students work on a plan to support people who are homeless, and they take action against homelessness.

  1. Preconceptions

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Poetry; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Empathy; Homelessness; Sensitivity
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities
  2. The Facts

    ELA: Brainstorming; Reflection; Research; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Empathy; Homelessness; Needs Assessment; Sensitivity
    SOC: Be the Change; Geography; Maps/Globes
  3. What Can We Do: Taking Action

    ELA: Letter Writing; Presentation; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Act of Philanthropy; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Homelessness; Reflection; Sensitivity; Volunteer
    SOC: Be the Change; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Nonprofit
9-12

Be the Change: Life Skills

The students will engage in activities to help them examine how they make use of their time, learn how to make an action plan and create 'To Do' lists to improve upon their own time management. The students will build upon what they learned about time management and develop a set of study skills that will help them to learn, truly understand, and recall material. They will learn a strategy for test taking that will serve them well on examines that require responding to questions relating to text. Students will engage in a variety of activities that will help them understand the value of budgeting and fundraising. They will investigate the concept of enlightened self-interest and how that correlates to good time and money management and civic engagement. They have the option to plan and implement a fundraising project for a nonprofit organization of their choice.

  1. Time Management

    ELA: Character Development; Vocabulary
    MAT: Estimation; Time
    PHIL: Character Education: Self-Discipline; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Be the Change
  2. Study and Test Taking Skills

    ELA: ; Constructing Meaning; Debate; Main Idea; Questioning; Reading; Response to Text/Others
    SOC: Be the Change; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good
  3. Money Management

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    MAT: Estimation; Money
    PHIL: Enlightened Self-Interest; Fundraising
    SOC: Be the Change; Budget; For-Profit; Nonprofit
9-12

Be the Change: Personal Health

Students examine their own eating, sleeping, and exercise habits. They compare them to national health standards, and develop plans for improving them. Then they share their learning to promote a healthier community.

  1. You Are What You Eat: Show What You Know

    ELA: Electronic Text; Expository Writing; Informational Media; Persuasive Techniques; Questioning; Reading; Synthesizing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Needs Assessment
    SOC: Be the Change; Business; Communities; Government; Nonprofit
  2. Give It a Rest!

    ELA: Journaling; Reading; Research; Self-Assessment
    PHIL: Advocacy
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities
  3. Move It or Lose It!

    MAT: Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Sensitivity; Service; Volunteering
    SCI: Health
    SOC: Be the Change; Communities
9-12

Be the Change: Violence

Students will form a collaborative definition of violence and its causes through discussion and research. They will evaluate the state of social capital of their own community, taking into consideration a variety of factors that contribute to violence or peace. Students will explore the causes and effects of bullying and brainstorm ways to address the problem. They will learn about domestic violence and visit a women's shelter or hear a presentation from a shelter representative. They will consider ways in which they can be peaceful within a violent community, country, or world and create products that advocate for peace.

  1. Defining Violence: Your Community

    ELA: Vocabulary
    SOC: Be the Change; Social Capitol
  2. Violence: Bullying

    ELA: Interview; Reflection; Survey
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    SOC: Be the Change; Bullying; Discrimination; Social Capital
  3. Being the Change: Violence Against Women

    ELA: Peer Review; Presentations
    PHIL: Advocacy; Women
    SOC: Be the Change; Social Capital
9-12

Be the Change: Workplace Readiness

Learners will determine the difference between for-profit and nonprofit organizations. They will investigate jobs in the nonprofit and for-profit sectors, and reflect on their own job related interests and skills. Students will create a resume, geared toward gaining employment in a particular field or job. Students will learn that using the Internet and critical thinking can help them in searching for a job. They will learn and practice skills needed for a successful job interview. Students may choose to plan and implement a "Job Skills Workshop" to share their new knowledge and skills with their peers.

 

  1. Resume and Cover Letter Tips

    ELA: Vocabulary
    SOC: Be the Change; Career Opportunities; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. Hitting the Pavement and Sealing the Deal

    ELA: Interview; Nonverbal Communication; Questioning; Role-Play
    SOC: Be the Change; Career Opportunities
  3. Professionalism: Doing What Works

    ELA: Interview; Resume; Role-Play; Self Assessment
    SOC: Be the Change; Career Opportunities
9-12

Bullying Prevention Plan

Students define bullying and analyze the roles of victims, bystanders, and the whole community. Students recognize that bullying is a civil rights issue that needs to be addressed to promote fairness and safety for all. They create a survey and poll members of their school and family communities. Youth utilize the persuasive power of oral writing and visual media as instruments of change.

Focus Question: What is the effect of bullying on the community, and what can be done to minimize bullying and its influence?

  1. Bullying Is a Civil Rights Issue

    ELA: Communicate; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Presentations; Research; Survey
    MAT: Data Analysis/Probability; Data Collection/Organization; Graphs/Charts/Tables
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Conflict Resolution; Needs Assessment; Philanthropist; Respect; Responsibility; School Climate; Sensitivity
    SOC: Bill of Rights; Bullying; Civil Rights; Community Capital; Constitution; Family; Justice
  2. Civic Virtue and Public Policy

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Text; Informational Genre; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Civil Society; Minorities; Philanthropist; Responsibility; Social Action
    SOC: Bullying; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Common Good; History; Human Rights; Justice; Persecution
  3. Speaking for the Minority Voice

    ELA: Communicate; Informational Media; Presentations; Social Media; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Problem Solving; School Climate; Sensitivity
    SOC: Bullying; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; School Community
9-12

Careers and Nonprofit Organizations

Learners will distinguish between nonprofit organizations and for-profit organizations. They will identify and dispel some of the myths of nonprofit employment. Using the Idealist: Action Without Borders Web site, www.idealist.org, the learners will investigate career opportunities in nonprofit organizations as well as some of the skills required in these careers. They will investigate a local nonprofit through an interview with an employee. They will orally present this information and conclude by writing personal reflections about nonprofits using the information that they found in their idealist.org investigation, their local nonprofit organization investigation, and the information obtained from the three interviews completed as homework.

  1. Careers and the Nonprofits

    ELA: Reflection; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Career Opportunities; Community
    SOC: 8 genOn; For-Profit; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Research
  2. Nonprofit Interviews

    ELA: Interview; Personal Response; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: Action Without Borders/Idealist.org; Career Opportunities; Community; Mission Statement; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteerism
    SOC: 8 genOn; Inquiry; Research
9-12

Careers: Living and Working with Animals

The learners will explore making career choices, including factors that help make a career satisfying, by focusing on careers with animals as examples. They will research various careers with animals and share their findings as a service project with an appropriate student-selected audience(s). They will demonstrate their new knowledge and experience by reflecting and writing an evaluative response about their knowledge of career choices and the impact of their service.

Focus Question:
What factors might influence a person’s career choice, and their satisfaction in a chosen career?

  1. Looking into Careers:
    Doing What I Like and Liking What I Do

    ELA: Group Discussions; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Animal Welfare; Career Opportunities; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Problem Solving; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues; Economics
  2. Career Advice

    ELA: Group Discussions; Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Career Opportunities; Caring/Sharing; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Helping; Reflection; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SCI: Animals; Data Collection/Organization; Stewardship
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Contemporary Issues
  3. Come to the Fair

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Communicate; Group Discussions; Peer Review; Presentation: Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Advocacy; Animal Welfare; Animals; Career Opportunities; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Reflection; Stewardship; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues
9-12

Challenging Social Boundaries

The purpose of this unit is to examine the causes and effects of historical incidents of race discrimination and public protest, drawing parallels to the students’ own personal acts of self-betrayal and demonstrating how these contribute to present day social barriers and the need for social action. Students will define stereotype, discrimination, racism and prejudice and brainstorm a social action plan to heal racism. Using the examples of history, students will describe the benefits of forming a non-profit organization to accomplish a cause rather than working alone, and experience how one works by forming a mock non-profit organization to handle an in-school project. As a concluding event, learners will sponsor “Mix It Up Day” to promote diversity within the school environment. Learners will experience roles as private citizens attempting to change behavior.
  1. Power of Protest (The)

    ELA: Listening; Prior Knowledge; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Teamwork; Understanding/Interpretation; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; African American; Civil Society; Commons; Discrimination; Empathy; Giving; Heroes; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Civil Rights; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Conflict Resolution; Discrimination; Equality; Good Character; Human Rights; Justice; Minorities; Parks, Rosa; Rights/Responsibilities; Rules; Tolerance
  2. Racism and the Box

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Group Discussions; Reflection; Role-Play; Social/Cultural Issues; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Discrimination; Reflection
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Racism; Segregation
  3. Getting Out of the Box

    ART: Music; Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Listening; Questioning; Reading
    PHIL: Altruism; Egoism; Respect; Self Interest; Selflessness; Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Consensus; Cultures; Discrimination; Diversity; Ethics; Minorities; Racism
  4. Power in Numbers

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Social/Cultural Issues; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Advocacy; African American; Board of Directors; Discrimination; Nonprofit Organizations
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Advocacy; Amendments to Constitution; Civil Rights; Desegregation
  5. Mix It Up!

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Group Discussions; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Activism; Reflection; School Climate; Social Action; Tolerance
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Choices/Consequences; Desegregation; School Community; Social Action
9-12

Civic Environmentalist: Rachel Carson (12th Grade)

Learners will understand and demonstrate their knowledge of the concept of civic environmentalism and the impact that one woman had on the world and our environment. The learners will understand how her advocacy is an example of civic environmentalism and how they can become civic environmentalists.

  1. Civic Environmentalist: Rachel Carson (12th Grade)

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Presentations; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Good Character; Philanthropic Act
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Conservation; Ecology; Environment
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Disaster: Human-Made; Environment; Health; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Values
9-12

Civic Virtue in Modern American Democracy

Students will identify, describe and evaluate characteristics of civic virtue (putting the common good above individual interests) in modern American society.
  1. What Is a Good Citizen? How the Textbook(s)
    Define Good Citizenship and/or Civic Virtue

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: Tocqueville, Alexis de; 9/11genOn; Common Good; Need
    SOC: Rousseau, Jean Jacques; 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Constitution of the Iroquis Nation; Good Character; Government; Personal Virtue; Roman Republic
  2. Developing a Personal Definition of Civic Virtue—e pluribus unum

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Reading; Reflection; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes; Vocabulary; Writing Process
    PHIL: Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Declaration of Independence; Good Character; Government; Ideals/Reality; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Primary/Secondary Sources; Roman Republic
  3. Great Debate (The)—Do Americans Today Have Civic Virtue?

    ELA: Debate; Persuasive Techniques; Point of View; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others; Thesis; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Advocacy; Analyze/Interpret; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Declaration of Independence; Good Character; Government; Ideals/Reality; Personal Virtue
  4. Ask the Experts—What Do Contemporary Surveys
    Tell Us About Americans and Civic Virtue?

    ELA: Bowling Alone; Analyze/Interpret; Debate; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Research; Response to Text/Others; Thesis; Universal Themes; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Fact/Opinion; Need; Problem Solving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Declaration of Independence; Good Character; Ideals/Reality; Inquiry; Personal Virtue
9-12

Climate Change Challenge (12th Grade)

  1. Climate Change Challenge (12th Grade)

    ELA: Informational Media; Reflection; Teamwork; Viewing; Visual Media
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Motivation for Giving
    SCI: Air; Environment
    SOC: Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Consensus; Economics; Environment; State Government
9-12

Comics and Cartoons of a Civil Society (10th Grade)

Learners will recognize that principles of justice, kindness, peace and tolerance are positive attributes of a civil society. Their awareness of these attributes will be enhanced as they search for examples of these attributes, or examples of the absence of these attributes, in political cartoons and newspaper comic strips. They will create cartoons of their own illustrating an aspect of civil society, and write a paragraph of explanation about their cartoon.

  1. Comics and Cartoons of a Civil Society (10th Grade)

    ELA: Universal Themes; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 1 lesson genOn; Civil Society; Kindness; Tolerance
    SOC: Democratic Values; Justice
9-12

Communities in Crisis (9-12)

Learners make those critical connections between primary sources and textual materials or secondary sources. The lessons and instructional sequence involve learners identifying philanthropic activities within their own community and state during the period of World War II. Stretching to their community today, they discover the role of ongoing philanthropic institutions and grassroots actions. Two engaging service-learning lessons give cohesive meaning to philanthropy in their community and state.

  1. Primary Source? What is That? (9-12)

    ELA: Biography; Journaling
    PHIL: Altruism; Social Action; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl; 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Democracy; Human Rights; Primary/Secondary Sources; Values
  2. Giving Beyond Measure-- Diary of Anne Frank (9-12)

    ELA: Anne Frank: Reflections on Her Life and Legacy; Anne Frank Remembered; Compare/Contrast; Response to Text/Others; Role-Play; Writing Process
    PHIL: Ennobled Self; Sacrifice; Social Justice
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Ethics; World War II
  3. The Roles of Individuals in the Warsaw Ghetto

    ELA: Brainstorming; Research; Writing Process
    PHIL: Character; Human Rights
    SOC: 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Community; Core Democratic Values; Reserved Powers; Timelines
  4. "Who Wants to Be an Octogenarian?" (A Service-Learning Activity) (9-12)

    ELA: Interview; Presentations; Reflection
    PHIL: Needs Assessment; Philanthropic Act; Sacrifice; Service Project
    SOC: Rosie the Riveter; 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Historical Biographies; Primary/Secondary Sources; World War II
  5. Philanthropy, A Timeline For Us (9-12)

    ELA: Peer Review; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Charity; Community; Contribute; Donate; Foundations; In-Kind Contribution; Learningtogive.org; Philanthropic Act; Service Project; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 6 genOn; 8 genOn; Good Character; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Taxation
9-12

Concepts of Leadership

This unit will enable students to identify the elements of decision-making that leaders have used throughout history and the challenges and rewards that they encountered as they committed themselves to taking private action for public good. Students will also understand the conflicts in society between economic and environmental interests and the role of the citizen in government.
  1. How Do Societies Ensure Leadership Takes Place?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Media Genres; Research; Response to Text/Others; Universal Themes
    PHIL: African American; Cultures; Leadership
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Chronology; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Colonization/Settlement (1585-1763); Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Government; Hodenosaunee Nation; Inquiry; Iroquois; Native Peoples; North West Ordinance; Ordinance of 1787; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Revolution/Nationhood (1754-1820)
  2. How Do Leaders Communicate Their Ideas?
    A Look at the Words of John Brown,
    Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: African American; Leadership; Sacrifice; Women
    SOC: Brown, John; Douglass, Frederick; Truth, Sojourner; 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Abolition; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Discrimination; Good Character; Harper’s Ferry; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Racism; Reform Movements (1801–1861); Slavery; Underground Railroad; Voting
  3. How Are Leaders Role Models for Their Beliefs? The Mormon Trail—Road of the Saints

    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Teamwork; Viewing
    PHIL: Cultures; Leadership
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Core Democratic Values; Expansion (1801-1861); Good Character; Mormon Trail; Mormons; Oregon Trail; Personal Virtue; Santa Fe Trail; Values
  4. What Choices Do Leaders Have to Make? Ida B. Wells

    ELA: Biography; Group Discussions; Viewing
    PHIL: Advocacy; African American; Leadership; Minorities
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Civil War/Reconstruction (1850-1877); Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Discrimination; Diversity; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Inquiry; KKK; Personal Virtue; Racism; Wells, Ida B.
  5. What Roles Do Philanthropists Play in Influencing
    Others?
    Andrew Carneige-The Gospel of Wealth

    ELA: Biography; Expository Writing; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Common Good; Giving; Leadership; Personal Wealth
    SOC: Carnegie, Andrew; Gates, Bill; Monoghan,Tom; Turner, Ted; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Contemporary Issues; Historical Biographies; Industrialization (1800-1900); Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Turner, Ted
  6. Teddy Roosevelt's View on Citizenship and the
    Environment

    ELA: Fact/Opinion; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Teamwork
    PHIL: Stewardship
    SOC: Roosevelt, Theodore; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Economics; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Laissez-Faire; Personal Virtue; Primary/Secondary Sources; Values
  7. Margaret Sanger—Risk Taker, Law Breaker, and Promoter of Change

    ELA: Fact/Opinion; Group Discussions; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Leadership; Nonprofit Organizations; Sacrifice; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Comstock Law; Core Democratic Values; Good Character; Great Depression; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Inquiry; Modern America, Emergence (1890-1930); Personal Virtue; Public Policy; Sanger, Margaret; Values
  8. Michigan's Philanthropic Tradition:
    Charles Stewart Mott

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Foundations; Leadership; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Wealth
    SOC: 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Industrialization (1800-1900); Inquiry; Modern America, Emergence (1890-1930); Mott Foundation; Mott, Charles Stewart; Personal Virtue; Values
  9. What Roles Do Philanthropists Play in Influencing
    Others?
    Cesar Chavez and the Farm Worker's Struggle

    ELA: Media Genres; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Advocacy; Hispanics; Leadership; Minorities; Stewardship
    SOC: Chávez, César; Grapes of Wrath; 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civil Rights; Common Good; Labor; Minorities; Nonprofit; Public Policy; Research
  10. Lifelong Leadership:
    Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter

    ELA: Reflection; Research; Technology
    PHIL: Leadership; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Wealth
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Carter, Jimmy; Carter, Rosalynn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Good Character; Habitat for Humanity; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research; Values
  11. Incorporating Leadership Into My Own Life

    ELA: Reflection; Teamwork; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Leadership
    SOC: 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Good Character; Personal Virtue
9-12

Creating Student-Generated Classroom Rules

Students will learn how to write "law" for the common good by identifying constitutionally recognized student rights and responsibilities, identifying individual behaviors that interfere with those rights, and writing rules to protect those rights. Students will also practice the skills needed for self-government by monitoring the rules as part of a classroom council.
  1. Rights and Responsibilities of Students (The)

    SOC: Bethal v Fraser; Tinker v DesMoines; 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Bill of Rights; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Constitution of the United States; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Federal Courts; Freedom; Justice; Public Policy; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law; State Courts; Supreme Court
  2. Creating Proposed Classroom Rules

    PHIL: Common Good; Cooperate
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Freedom; Justice; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law
  3. Voting on the Classroom Rules

    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Freedom; Justice; Majority Rule; Parliamentary Procedure; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law; Voting
  4. Monitoring the Classroom Rules

    PHIL: Common Good; Problem Solving
    SOC: 1 genOn; 8 genOn; Cause/Effect; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Compare/Contrast; Core Democratic Values; Decision Making Model; Freedom; Justice; Majority Rule; Parliamentary Procedure; Reflection; Rights/Responsibilities; Rule of Law; Voting
9-12

Cultural Diversity in Service

This unit focuses on different traditions of giving through world cultures (and religious traditions), looking for similarities that connect us. In addition, learners recognize that diversity makes our community stronger. Learners read and research giving and serving practices of diverse cultures. Students develop personal mission statements and create visual/audio presentations of "Why I Serve" as it relates to their personal motivations, culture, experiences, and perceptions. Students share their findings and creative work as an act of advocacy for service. 

Focus Question: How do traditional culture and personal experience influence attitudes and practices of giving and serving?

  1. Observing First Impressions

    ELA: Communicate; Electronic Text; Knight scholarship; Listening; Reading; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Character; Civil Society; Common Good; Reflection; Service
    SOC: 8 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Family; Stereotypes; Traditions; Values; Volunteerism
  2. Cultural Connections

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Knight scholarship; Main Idea; Reading; Reflection; Summarizing; Teamwork
    PHIL: Character; Cultures; Diversity; Leadership; Mission Statement; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service; Traditions
    SOC: Carver, George Washington; Chávez, César; Edhi, Abdul Sattar; Bahuguna, Sunderlal; Communities; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Nonprofit
  3. Why I Serve

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Creative Writing; Knight scholarship; Listening; Presentations; Reflection; Technology; Viewing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Family; Mission Statement; Motivations for Giving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service; Traditions; Values
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Diversity; Good Character
9-12

Dear Philanthropist

In this unit, learners discover what motivated philanthropists from history to engage in their work. They engage in research of a philanthropist's public life and present this information, both orally and in writing, creating a public display of that philanthropist's life and work.
  1. "Dear Philanthropist"

    ELA: Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Common Good; Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research
  2. Research and Development

    ELA: Letter Writing; Presentations; Technology; Writing Process
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Inquiry; Personal Virtue; Research
  3. "I Just Learned About the Coolest Person"

    ELA: Poetry; Presentations
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Historical Biographies
  4. "Dear Young Philanthropist"

    ELA: Letter Writing; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropist
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Good Character; Historical Biographies; Personal Virtue
9-12

Defining Philanthropy

The lessons that comprise this unit were designed to give students an opportunity to draw from their prior knowledge as well as new experiences to develop a deeper understanding of the concept of philanthropy. Student writing skills are also heavily emphasized in this unit. It is also designed to develop a personal definition for the term philanthropy that is based on prior knowledge as well as facts learned in this unit.

  1. Philanthro What?

    ELA: Inferences/Generalizations; Research; Synthesizing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropist; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 8 genOn
  2. Bio-Poem

    ELA: Biography; Inferences/Generalizations; Poetry; Research; Synthesizing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Contribute; Philanthropist; Social Action; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn
  3. Philanthropic Prescriptions

    ELA: Biography; Compare/Contrast; Graphic Organizer; Inferences/Generalizations; Research; Role-Play; Synthesizing; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropist
    SOC: 10 genOn
  4. Essay of Definition - Part I

    ELA: Research; Teamwork; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropist; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn
  5. Essay of Definition - Part II

    ELA: Research; Teamwork; Technology; Thesis; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Common Good; Philanthropist
    SOC: 10 genOn
9-12

Disaster Relief - Power, Generosity and Leadership! (9-12)

Learners research problems caused by a natural disaster and cite examples of aid provided in an effort to help those devastated populations. They will investigate the role of the four economic sectors in responding to the needs. They will participate in a collection campaign and learn about organizations to which they can contribute their philanthropy.

Focus Question: Whose responsibility is it to help victims of a natural disaster?

To access this lesson, please click here.

  1. Disaster Relief - Power, Generosity and Leadership! (9-12)

    ELA: Cause/Effect; Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Research
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 9/11genOn; Activism; Common Good; Community; Donate; Emergency Response; Fundraising; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Advocacy; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Current Events; Disaster: Natural; Economics; Presidential Roles
9-12

Diverse Community: Who Is My Neighbor? (9-12)

Students view examples of media being used to promote responsibility and acceptance. They view YouTube videos that inspire them to make connections with people locally and globally. They learn about an artist who leaves free art in public spaces to raise optimism in tough times. They explore stereotypes and prejudices and create art to build connections with “neighbors.”

  1. Uniqueness and Prejudice

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Role-Play
    PHIL: Empathy; Stereotypes; Tolerance
    SOC: Cultures; Discrimination; Diverse Communities; Diversity; Global Issues
  2. Connecting People Through Art

    ART: Dance; Visual Arts
    ELA: Communicate; Informational Media; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Advocacy; Global Community; Neighborhood; Stereotypes
    SOC: Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Global Issues
  3. Service to the Neighborhood

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Audience; Communicate; Presentation
    PHIL: Advocacy; Neighborhood; Service; Social Action
    SOC: Common Good; Diverse Communities; Diversity
9-12

Don't Be Impervious to the Impermeable

This unit is about the impact of growth (commercial and residential) on the environment and how everyone needs to be aware of the trade-offs. Specifically, this unit will examine how the use of impervious surfaces impacts the environment. The unit will also illustrate how knowledge of science informs our decisions and awareness as citizens. The lessons evolve from engaging the learner’s interest, becoming aware of the issue in their community and taking action in their community for the common good.Population density and community development has political and environmental implications. The development of cities, towns, suburbs and rural America share a common feature; a transportation system that relies on cars and trucks and the highways, roadways and parking lots that they demand. As towns and suburbs grow, the commercial and residential building “footprint” on the landscape will be harmful to the environment unless carefully planned. The issue related to “sprawl”, “population density” and the environment is the use of concrete, brick and asphalt; all impervious surfaces. The purpose of this lesson is to make learners aware of the environmental impact of impervious surfaces and empower them to become environmental stewards.

Focus Questions:
What is the relationship between community development and the environment?
How has development negatively impacted my community and what can be done about it?
 

  1. Whose Land Is It Anyway?

    ELA: Point of View; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Advocacy; Environmental Stewardship; Mission Statement; Reflection; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Critical Thinking; Earth Changes; Ecology; Natural Resources
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Environment; Natural Characteristics of Place; Population; Resources; Stewardship
  2. You Can't Escape the Landscape

    ELA: Poetry; Point of View; Writing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SCI: Cause/Effect; Environment; Land Management; Population Growth; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; Population; Transportation; Urbanization
  3. The Landscape, Leave It Better than You Found It

    ELA: Presentations; Research
    MAT: Data Collection/Organization
    PHIL: Environment; Environmental Stewardship; Symbiosis; Terrain; Water
    SCI: Environment; Symbiosis; Terrain; Water
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Natural Characteristics of Place; Resources; Stewardship
9-12

Encouraging Volunteerism

Learners will understand that the giving of their time, talent and treasure will improve the quality of life in their communities. Their active participation in community life makes their community and government stronger. This unit will stimulate, develop, educate for and encourage youth volunteerism at home, in school and in the community.

  1. Story of Giving (A)

    ELA: Quilt Maker's Gift (The); Fable; Perception; Symbols/Images/Sounds
    PHIL: 9/11genOn; Philanthropic Act; Philanthropic Traditions; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 12 genOn; 8 genOn
  2. Citizen Participation

    PHIL: Community; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities
  3. Making Choices with Scarce Resources

    PHIL: Common Good; Opportunity Costs; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Common Good; Costs; Economics; Opportunity Costs; Scarcity
  4. Nonprofits and Me

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Letter Writing
    PHIL: Career Opportunities; Foundations; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Cooperative Groups; For-Profit; Foundations; Nonprofit Organizations; Volunteerism
9-12

Environment: Sustaining Our World (9-12)

The students compare and contrast the uses and aesthetics of dirt and pavement groundcover. They define permeable and impermeable ground surfaces and discuss the merits of each in relationship to the environment. They define environmental stewardship and determine responsibility for caring for the environment. The students define philanthropy and relate it to environmental stewardship. They analyze mission statments from environmental organizations and write their own personal mission statement.  They self-select a group to plan and implement an environmental service project.

  1. Pavement or Dirt?

    SOC: Environment; Terrain
  2. They Paved Paradise

    SCI: Environment; Terrain
  3. Carefully Managing the Earth's Resources

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Peer Review; Personal Response; Writing Process
    PHIL: 4 genOn; Mission Statement; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Environment; Geography; Maps/Globes; Nonprofit
9-12

Environmental Groups and the Three Economic Sectors

This unit sets the stage for an introduction to the three economic sectors: "profit," "nonprofit" and "government." The students learn what makes an organization fit into its appropriate category. Taking that information, they apply it to researching environmental groups within the three categories. Students must decide into which sector they fall and why. The students then take their knowledge of nonprofit organizations and apply that information to the research of nonprofit environmental organizations. The historical focus of this unit is the 1960's and the students are introduced to the factors that led to the creation of the environmental movement and environmental stewardship.  The unit has a strong economic focus as well that allows student to interpret data about environmental nonprofit organizations investigated. This information is used as students decide how to invest their time and money in a nonprofit environmental organization. The students must also identify why they would support an environmental group of their choosing thereby making key economic decisions about their own spending and time.

  1. Identify the Three Economic Sectors

    PHIL: LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Economics; For-Profit; Nonprofit
  2. Match the Environmental Group with the Correct Sector

    ELA: Listening; Media Genres; Presentations; Technology
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: Environmental Protection Agency; Greenpeace; National Park Service; World Wildlife Federation; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Economics; Environment; For-Profit; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Public Policy; Research
  3. Nonprofit Environmental Groups

    ELA: Listening; Media Genres; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Technology
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment
    SOC: Environmental Protection Agency; Greenpeace; National Park Service; World Wildlife Federation; 10 genOn; 4 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Decision Making Model; Economics; Environment; Inquiry; Nonprofit; Public Policy; Research
9-12

Executive Branch—Gifts to the Future (The) (9-12)

  1. Exercising Presidential Power

    ELA: Viewing
    PHIL: Nonprofit Organization (NGO); Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Constitution of the United States; Presidential System; Separation of Powers
9-12

Finding Self in Community (11th Grade)

Learners will identify some of the roles they play in their various communities. They will explore the vocabulary of beliefs/values and identify how and when these values affect the various roles they play in community. This understanding of their beliefs/values will be used to help them determine reasons and motivations for roles they might play in the larger community.

  1. Finding Self in Community (11th Grade)

    ELA: Vocabulary
    PHIL: 10 lesson genOn; Altruism; Community; Empathy; Motivation for Giving; Service Project; Values
    SOC: Community; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry; Values
9-12

Food for Thought: Hunger—Around the Block,
Around the World

Learners will describe what constitutes good nutritional practices, compare their own eating patterns to these practices and encourage others to improve their own eating habits. They will determine the value of acting on behalf of others and decide if their actions can make a difference in the school. Learners will investigate the difference between hunger and malnutrition, analyze hunger in the community and research local groups that aid the hungry. They will compare the depiction of hunger in world literature and describe causes of hunger in the world. Learners will distinguish between the many different approaches to hunger in the United States and abroad by looking at governmental versus nonprofit programs. They will reflect on the importance of philanthropic actions in solving the problems of hunger in the world.

  1. Food – What's in It for You?

    ART-VA: Audience; Creative Writing; Expository Text; Graphic Organizer; Journaling; Visual Arts: Create/Communicate; Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Creative Writing; Expository Text; Graphic Organizer; Journaling; Presentations; Research; Vocabulary
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Activism; Common Good; Philanthropic Act; Service Project
    SCI: Food; Graphs/Charts/Tables; Health; Life Science; Nutrition
    SOC: 12 genOn
  2. Local Hunger and Malnutrition

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Non-Fiction Literature; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Community; Hunger
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Economics; Nonprofit
  3. Thoughts on Global Hunger

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Fiction Literature; Journaling; Personal Response; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Choices/Consequences; Economics; Trade
  4. Making a Difference in the World

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: 11 genOn; 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger; Nonprofit Organizations; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 11 genOn; 12 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Disaster: Human-Made; Disaster: Natural; Distribution
9-12

For Goodness Sake, Why Don't We Give More Power to the People?

This unit will introduce the learners to the manner in which marginalized, disenfranchised and disadvantaged individuals have used the nonprofit sector as an alternative power structure in American society. They will research various local and national organizations, events, and leaders involved with creating positive change for the common good. They will conduct a community survey involving women and minority groups and discover the problems they faced and continue to face. They will report their findings in the school and/or community newspaper. They will create bookmarks about local women and minorities to be given to other schools and the local library to distribute to community members.

As an extension, they will write essays on why the community feels as it does, and agree or disagree with the community's views. After learning about the various nonprofit organizations associated with marginalized, disenfranchised or disadvanaged individuals and/or groups, learners can choose to volunteer their time, talent, and/or treasure to these organizations.

  1. Power, Power, Who Holds the Power?

    PHIL: Altruism; Business; Charity; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Hispanics; Native Americans; Nonprofit Sector; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Business; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Discrimination; Diversity; Good Character; Government; Historical Biographies; Persecution; Personal Virtue; Research; Rights/Responsibilities
  2. Changing for the Common Good

    PHIL: Minorities; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Chronology; Discrimination; For-Profit; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Nonprofit; Timelines
  3. Power to the People

    PHIL: Minorities; Women
    SOC: 1 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Core Democratic Values; Discrimination; Diversity; Historical Biographies; Human Rights; Ideals/Reality; Research; Social Action
  4. Surveys and Nonprofits

    PHIL: Community; Needs Assessment
    SOC: 1 genOn; Compare/Contrast; Inquiry; Interview; Social Action; Survey
9-12

For the Well-Being of Our Citizens

Students will define poverty, connect it to human rights issues and analyze how nonprofit organizations have an important role to play in alleviating the effects of poverty.
  1. Social Programs and Government Responsibility

    PHIL: Community; Philanthropic Act; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; 6 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Federalism; Great Depression; Limited Government; Local Government; National Government; Presidential Roles; Public Policy; State Government; Volunteerism
  2. Poverty and Human Rights

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Cultural/Historical Contexts; Expository Text; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Human Rights; Nonprofit Sector
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; 6 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Contemporary Issues; Human Rights; Universal Declaration of Human Rights
  3. To the Rescue

    ELA: Advertising/Marketing; Brainstorming; Informational Genre; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 genOn; Community; Global Community; Homelessness; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 12 genOn; 4 genOn; 6 genOn; Contemporary Issues; Economics; For-Profit; Goods and Services; Government; Nonprofit; Volunteerism; Wants/Needs
9-12

Games People Play (9-12)

Learners explore the role games play in enhancing the common good, and they identify characteristics of one who plays the "game of life" in a way that promotes the common good. They define the concepts of contract and social contract and make an analogy between civil society and the "game of life" (includes rules, trust, and relationships). Through learning and playing the card game Bridge, students learn and practice life/social skills (problem solving, good character, interpersonal communication, collaboration, and discipline). They also learn valuable study skills of memory, concentration, and critical thinking. 
Focus Question: How do game rules and strategies apply to life? 

  1. Rules of the Game (9-12)

    ELA: Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Social Contract
    SOC: Common Good; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Rules; School Community; Social Action
  2. Bridging the Gap with "Bridge" (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Common Good; Family; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Service Project; Social Contract
    SOC: Consensus; Good Character; Personal Virtue; Rules; School Community; Social Action
  3. Let the Games Begin! (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Algebraic Expressions; Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Common Good; Community; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge; Service Project
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  4. Opening and Responding (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  5. Competitive Bidding (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  6. Stayman Convention (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Comparing Numbers; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
  7. Preemptive Bid (9-12)

    ELA: Communicate; Listening; Teamwork; Vocabulary
    MAT: Algebraic Expressions; Comparing Numbers; Counting; Data Analysis/Probability; Inductive/Deductive Reasoning; Infer; Mental Computation; Numeral Patterns; Predict; Problem Solving; Similarity; Sort/Classify; Symbols
    PHIL: Bridge LEAGUE; Cooperate; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: School Bridge
    SOC: Cause/Effect; Rules
9-12

Generosity of Spirit Folktales

Folktales from all over the world reveal much about giving to others. They reveal a "generosity of spirit" that speaks the language of "giving" whether it be the giving of time, talent or treasure. This unit will look at various types of folktales, from various places, with various morals/lessons.

Learners will identify what constitutes a folktale, describe the different types of folktales, define philanthropy, recognize cultural influences in folktales, analyze motivations for giving and recognize models of "giving" in folktales from around the world.

  1. Understanding Folktales and Their Philanthropic Connections

    ELA: Folktales; Myths; Parable
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Common Good; Motivation for Giving; Philanthropic Literature; Sacrifice; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Common Good
  2. Australian Folktales

    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: How the Kangaroo Got Her Pouch; How the Selfish Goannas Lost Their Wives; Secret of Dreaming (The); Folktales; Myths; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Environmental Stewardship; Philanthropic Literature; Philanthropic Traditions
    SOC: Australia; Cultures; Environment; Human Characteristics of Place; Native Peoples; Natural Characteristics of Place
  3. Reluctant Givers

    ELA: Collared Crow (The); Couple of Misers (A); Story and a Song (A); Story-Bag (The); Fable; Folktales; Perception; Story Mapping
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Hunger; Motivation for Giving; Sharing
    SOC: Africa; Asia; Cultures; Geography; India; Korea; Scarcity
  4. Gifts of All Sizes

    ELA: Brave Little Parrot (The); Drum (The); Luck of a Child (The); Ma’Ruf the Shoemaker; Sedge Hats for Jizo; Silk Brocade (The); Tatema (The); Fable; Folktales; Perception; Retelling
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Buddhism; Giving; Judaism; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Asia; China; Cultural Regions; Good Character; India; Japan; Kuridstan; Mexico; Opportunity Costs; Palestine; South America
  5. Chinese Folktales

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Lord of the Cranes; Lo-Sun, the Blind Boy; Fable; Folktales; Plot Development
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Kindness
    SOC: Asia; China; Choices/Consequences; Human Characteristics of Place
  6. Inuit Folktales

    ELA: Old Woman Who Was Kind to Insects (The); Tiggak; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Native Americans
    SOC: Native Peoples; Natural Characteristics of Place
  7. Buddhist Folktales

    ELA: Banyan Deer (The); Blossom Tree (The); Great Joy the Ox; Padmasambhava and the Felicity Scarf; Steadfast Parrot (The); Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Folktales; Myths; Perception
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Character; Common Good; Friendship; Leadership; Religious Perspectives; Sacrifice
    SOC: Asia; Cultural Regions; India; Religion; Siddhartha Gautama; Tibet
  8. Reactions of the Masters

    ELA: Beth Gellert; Evil Allures, But Good Endures; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Perception; Tolstoy
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Philanthropic Act; Sacrifice
    SOC: Europe; Good Character; Human Characteristics of Place; Prince Llewelyn of Wales; Russia; Wales
  9. Gifts Disrespected

    ELA: Flowering Tree (A); Magic Bear (The); Fable; Folktales; Perception
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Native Americans; Respect
    SOC: Asia; Human Characteristics of Place; India
  10. Jewish Folktales

    ELA: Clotheslines (The); Defending His Property; Loosening the Stopper; Special Gift (A); Three Laughs (The); Author’s Style/Purpose; Folktales; Parable; Perception; Role-Play; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Judaism; Religious Perspectives; Tzedakah
    SOC: Asia; Cultures; Europe; Human Characteristics of Place; Israel; Poland; Rabbi Levi Yitzhak of Berdichev; Rabbi Schneur Zalman; Rabbi Yisrael Baal Shem Tov
  11. African Folktales

    ELA: Collared Crow (The); Cruel Creditor and the Judge’s Wise Daughter (The); Gratitude: The Hunter and the Antelope; Ostrich Egg Wife (The); Selekana and the River God; Africa; Constructing Meaning; Fable; Folktales; Morocco; Perception; Reflection; South Africa
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; African American; Character; Giving; Helping; Honesty; Justice; Kindness; Trust
    SOC: Choices/Consequences; Cultural Regions; Decision Making Model; Human Characteristics of Place; Justice
  12. Native American Folktales

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Bokewa or The Humpback; Circle of Life and the Clambake (The); Collared Crow (The); Cruel Creditor and the Judge’s Wise Daughter (The); Hopis and the Famine (The); Little Boy Who Talked With Birds (The); Magic Bear (The); Mon-Daw-Min or the Origin of Indian Corn: An Ojibwa Tale; Old Woman Who Was Kind to Insects (The); Ostrich Egg Wife (The); Selekana and the River God; Sheem: The Forsaken Boy; Thunder Deputizes the Eagle (The); Tiggak; Two Jeebi-Ug or A Trial of Feeling (The); Brainstorming; Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Group Discussions; Myths; Perception; Research; Stereotyping/Bias; Story Mapping; Writing Process
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Caring/Sharing; Character; Family; Giving; Helping; Leadership; Native Americans
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Cherokee; Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Hopi; Human Characteristics of Place; Inuit; Maya; Menomini; Native Peoples; Ojibwa; South America; Wampanoag
  13. Hospitality

    ELA: Calabash of Poi (A); Even Her Taking Was Giving; Luck of a Child (The); Soup of the Soup; Compare/Contrast; Concept Mapping; Folktales; Hawaii; Israel; Kuridstan; Myths; Social/Cultural Issues; Vocabulary
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Caring/Sharing; Islam; Judaism
    SOC: Cultures; Human Characteristics of Place
  14. Forgiveness

    ART-M: Music: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Both Friend and Foe the Saints Adore; Little Boy Who Talked With Birds (The); Young Man Who Refused to Kill (The); Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Perception; Social/Cultural Issues; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Family
    SOC: Cultures; Family; India; Maya; South America; Tibet
  15. Environmental Stewardship

    ART-M: Music: Create/Communicate
    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Brave Little Parrot (The); Kogi the Priest; Secret of Dreaming (The); Concept Mapping; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Folktales; Myths; Presentations; Research
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Civil Society; Environmental Stewardship; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Stewardship
    SCI: Environment
    SOC: Australia; Civil Society; Cultures; Ecosystems; India; Japan; Natural Characteristics of Place
  16. Sufi Folktales

    ELA: Mullah in the Turkish Bath; Mullah’s Miracle; Three Fridays; Folktales; Perception; Social/Cultural Issues; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Character; Islam; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: Cultural Regions; Human Characteristics of Place; Iran; Persia
  17. Folktales from the Americas

    ELA: Boy and His Donkey (A); Gratitude: The Hunter and the Antelope; Harvest Birds (The); Hog (The); Trouble With Helping Out (The); Anansi; Author’s Style/Purpose; Character Development; Constructing Meaning; Fable; Folktales; Perception
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; African American; Character; Hispanics; Reciprocity; Serial Reciprocity
    SCI: Garden; Symbiosis
    SOC: Africa; Cultural Regions; Human Characteristics of Place; Mexico; South America; Surinam
  18. Asian Folktales

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: History/Culture
    ELA: Aina-Kizz and the Black-Bearded Bai; Clever Wife (The); Earth Cakes, Sky Cakes; King Who Was Fried (The); Sayed’s Boots; Stubborn Husband, Stubborn Wife; Woodcutter (The); Author’s Style/Purpose; Compare/Contrast; Constructing Meaning; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Folktales; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Character; Judaism; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: China; Cultural Regions; Human Characteristics of Place; India; Iran; Palestine; Persia; Vietnam
  19. Tales of Wisdom and Discernment

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Magic Pomegranate (The); Old Alchemist (The); Story of the Two Old Women (The); Wise Quail (The); Author’s Style/Purpose; Compare/Contrast; Fable; Folktales; Parable; Personal Response
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Buddhism; Conflict Resolution; Egoism; Judaism
    SOC: Bangladesh; Burma; Cultural Regions; Decision Making Model; Human Characteristics of Place; India
  20. European Folktales

    ELA: Fairy Shilling (The); Lute Player (The); Three Fayes (The); Treasure (The); Where Love Is, God Is; Analyze/Interpret; Compare/Contrast; Fable; Folktales; Letter Writing; Parable; Perception; Tolstoy
    PHIL: Generosity of Spirit; Act of Kindness; Character; Christianity; Foundations; Judaism; Pro-Social Behavior
    SOC: Cultural Regions; Cultures; Czechoslovakia; Good Character; Human Characteristics of Place; Ireland; Russia; Sweden
9-12

George H.W. Bush and Points of Light

Students explore the legacy of George H. W. Bush and how he contributed to the common good as part of his lifelong commitment to service and through his Points of Light initiative. They compare and contrast the four economic sectors and how they meet needs differently. They write a persuasive piece about government philanthropy. They trace the impact of Bush's points of light speech through one organization and advocate for an issue that contributes to the common good.

Enduring Understanding: Students identify George H. W. Bush as the father of the modern service movement and identify philanthropy and the civil society sector as part of the fabric of the U.S. and democracy.

  1. George H.W. Bush and the Common Good

    ELA: Narrative Writing; Presentations; Voice; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Civil Society; Contribute; Motivation for Giving; Reflection; Service
    SOC: Bush, George H. W.; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Economics; Nonprofit
  2. What Is Government Philanthropy?

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Research; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Benefits; Civil Society; Family
    SOC: Bush, George H. W.; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Society; Civilian Conservation Corps; Costs; Democracy; Economics; For-Profit; Government; Great Depression; Nonprofit; Wants/Needs
  3. Points of Light Institute

    ELA: Graphic Organizer; Reflection; Technology
    PHIL: Advocacy; Civil Society
    SOC: Bush, George H. W.; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Economics; Government; Nonprofit
  4. Participatory Citizenship

    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Electronic Text; Informational Media; Reading; Resources
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Civil Society; Philanthropic Organizations; Reflection
    SOC: Bush, George H. W.; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civil Rights; Civil Society; Democracy; Dictatorship; Economics; Government; Primary/Secondary Sources
9-12

Gift of Art (The): Private Action for the Common Good (PAG)

The students will review the concept of philanthropy through viewing a logo. They will design original logos that represent philanthropy and related ideas. They will explore philanthropic behavior as it relates to the arts.

  1. Gift of Art (The): Private Action for the Common Good (PAG)

    ELA: Universal Themes
    PHIL: 2 lesson genOn; Art from the Heart; Serial Reciprocity; Time/Talent/Treasure; Visual Arts
9-12

Giving to Others (Tzedakah) (Private-Religious)

In the modern era, charity is often an essential component of the community. Children are often bombarded with television advertisements, billboards, articles and stories of charities. Many times, young people do not understand the concept of giving charities, the origins or the importance. These lessons are intended to give the students an overview of what charity is, why it is important, how to give it, to whom to give it, and the benefits of giving it.      

  1. Maimonides' Eight Levels (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Influence; Letter Writing; Main Idea; Parable; Presentations; Reflection; Response to Text; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Career Opportunities; Charity; Contribute; Donate; Helping; Judaism; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Plan; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Ethics; Parochial
  2. Charity in the Bible (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Cause/Effect; Compare/Contrast; Creative Writing; Group Discussions; Main Idea; Reading; Reflection; Response to Text/Others
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Charity; Civil Society; Giving; Judaism; Religious Perspectives; Values
    SOC: Common Good; Communities; Consumption; Environment; Ethics; Land Use; Parochial; Production/Producer; Resources
  3. 10% to the Needy (Private-Religious)

    ELA: Biography; Group Discussions; Point of View; Questioning; Social/Cultural Issues
    MAT: Money; Percent
    PHIL: Judaism
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Communities; Consumption; Environment; Ethics; Land Use; Parochial; Resources; Values
9-12

Global Education: Why Learn? (9-12)

Students analyze the effects of education on individuals, communities, and the world. They demonstrate that we are all connected and that others are affected by things that we believe only affect us. Students read and review statistics that highlight the lower number of girls than boys who attend schools around the world. They identify the reasons for gender inequality in schools and explore what policies and measures are in place for achieving universal primary education for kids all over the world. Students take action to either raise funds and/or to increase awareness of the importance of education for students in developing countries.

Focus Question: What are the effects of educating every child in the world?
  1. School Is Out

    ELA: Role-Play
    PHIL: Community; Global Community
    SOC: Business; Common Good; Family; Global Issues; Government; Nonprofit
  2. Whose Responsibility Is It?

    ELA: Response to Text/Others; Visual Media
    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Empathy; Empower
    SOC: Civil Rights; Common Good; Geography; Interdependence
  3. UN's Millenium Goals

    ELA: Communicate; Teamwork; Visual Media
    PHIL: Advocacy; Donate; Philanthropic Act; Service
    SOC: Common Good; Interdependence; Maps/Globes
9-12

Global Health: Hunger and Food Around the Globe (9-12)

Students view pictures of families from around the world with the food that they eat in a week. They discuss how cultural and regional differences affect food. They analyze a healthy diet and reflect on whether the nutritional needs of families are an issue of the common good. They assess their own food choices and address a food/health related issue or need, locally or globally.

  1. What Do People Around the World Eat?

    ELA: Personal Response; Viewing; Viewpoint; Visual Media
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger; Reflection
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Cultures; Diverse Communities; Diversity; Economics; Global Issues; Health and Disease; Major World Regions
  2. Where Does Our Food Travel?

    ELA: Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Reflection; Technology; Visual Media
    MAT: Comparing Numbers
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Global Community; Hunger; Reflection
    SOC: Cultures; Distribution; Economics; Environment; Global Issues; Health and Disease; Location
  3. Local Food and Global Health

    ELA: Group Discussions; Information Gathering; Social/Cultural Issues; Synthesizing; Teamwork
    PHIL: 5 genOn; Advocacy; Giving; Global Community; Hunger; Needs Assessment; Reflection; Service; Volunteer
    SOC: Cultures; Diverse Communities; Global Issues; Health and Disease
9-12

Global Hunger and Malnutrition (11th Grade)

Learners will describe how hunger and malnutrition are related, but not the same problems. They will recognize hunger as a global community issue and the role of the four sectors of society in solving problems of hunger in the community. They will be challenged to apply their own time, talent and treasure to address the issue of local hunger.

  1. Global Hunger and Malnutrition (11th Grade)

    ELA: Non-Fiction Literature; Research; Universal Themes
    PHIL: 11 lesson genOn; 12 lesson genOn; 5 genOn; Caring/Sharing; Community; Giving; Hunger; Responsibility
    SOC: Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Health and Disease; Scarcity
9-12

Great Debate (The)--Do Americans Today Have
Civic Virtue? (10th Grade)

Having formulated an initial opinion on whether or not Americans today exhibit civic virtue, the learners will defend their positions in light of the opinions of writers. They will make a personal plan to exhibit civic virtue through civic engagement in an environmental act.

  1. Great Debate (The)--Do Americans Today Have
    Civic Virtue? (10th Grade)

    ELA: Debate; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Questioning; Research; Speaking; Summarizing/Paraphrasing
    PHIL: 4 lesson genOn; Activism; Advocacy; Community; Environmental Stewardship; Service Plan; Social Action; Values; Volunteer
    SOC: Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Communities; Environment; Point of View; Rights/Responsibilities
9-12

Grow Involved 9-12

Students respond to literature about Martin Luther King, Jr. They examine his philosophy about serving and taking action and compare it to the philosophies of characters in books and a movie (some fiction, some nonfiction). They follow his model to promote the idea of doing good for others. Students learn that service and social action by one person can change the world. They learn about serial reciprocity and explore the issues of violence, prejudice, and racism.
This unit can be taught as grade specific using two lessons (Grade 9 - Lessons 1 & 2 , Grade 10 - Lessons 1 & 3, Grade 11 - Lessons 1 & 4, Grade 12 - Lessons 1 & 5). To extend the learning and service experiences, additional lesson can be used, as time allows.
  1. Advocacy and Activism (Introduction Grade 9-12)

    ELA: Group Discussions; Journaling; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: African American; Justice; Philanthropist; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Common Good; Desegregation; Human Rights
  2. Pay It Forward (Grade 9)

    ELA: Brainstorming; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Reflection; Viewing
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Advocacy; Caring/Sharing; Community; Donate; Needs Assessment; Serial Reciprocity; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Consensus
  3. Promote Nonviolence (Grade 10)

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Character Development; Inferences/Generalizations; Social/Cultural Issues
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Civil Society; Community; Conflict Resolution; Empathy; Reflection
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Justice
  4. Do the Write Thing (Grade 11)

    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Autobiography; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Letter Writing; Reflection
    PHIL: Advocacy; Conflict Resolution; Problem Solving; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civil Rights; Government; Justice
  5. A Forum on Racism (Grade 12)

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Autobiography; Compare/Contrast; Debate; Group Discussions
    PHIL: Advocacy; African American; Justice; Problem Solving; Social Action
    SOC: King, Jr., Martin Luther; 1 genOn; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Civil Rights; Common Good; Consensus; Racism
9-12

Growing a Citizen

This unit stresses the skills young people need to participate in the democratic process as responsible citizens. Too often “politics” is heard as a dirty word and thought of as the work of elected officials rather than citizens. Young people are citizens. We need to provide experiences where they do the work of citizens, where they feel positive that they can make a difference, where they act responsibly and where they are safe.
  1. What Would Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha and Krishna Say?

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Cultural/Historical Contexts; Fable; Letter Writing; Literary Forms/Genre; Parable; Personal Response; Point of View; Reading; Response to Text/Others; Understanding/Interpretation
    PHIL: Act of Kindness; Analyze/Interpret; Charity; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Human Rights; Justice; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Religion; Tolerance; Traditions; Values
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Analyze/Interpret; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Common Good; Cultures; Diversity; Human Rights; Justice; Personal Virtue; Point of View; Religion; Tolerance; Traditions; Values
  2. Participatory Citizen or Slacker—Which One Will You Be?

    ELA: Audience; Constructing Meaning; Group Discussions; Language/Style; Personal Response; Research; Social/Cultural Issues; Synthesizing; Understanding/Interpretation; Voice
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Civil Society; Social Action; Values
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Core Democratic Values; Democratic Values; Social Action; Values
  3. Personal Giving Mission Statement (A)

    ELA: Writing Process
    PHIL: Civil Society; Helping; Mission Statement; Personal Giving Plan
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Civic Responsibility/Virtue; Core Democratic Values; Nonprofit Organizations
  4. Putting Citizenship into Practice

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Journaling; Point of View; Reflection; Self Assessment
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Mission Statement; Reflection; Service Learning
    SOC: 1 genOn; 10 genOn; Advocacy; Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Common Good; Core Democratic Values; Economics
9-12

Growing an Environmental Steward

The purpose of this unit is to assist the learner in developing a deeper understanding of what it means to be a steward of the environment and to apply this knowledge to identified environmental problems as they relate to landscaping and gardening. 

Focus Question: “How can I, as one person, become a steward of my environment and affect positive change?”
 

  1. Envi and Ron Steward

    PHIL: Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment
    SOC: Communities
  2. In My Own Backyard

    ELA: Group Discussions; Reflection; Summarizing/Paraphrasing; Survey; Writing Mechanics
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SCI: Conservation; Environment
    SOC: Communities
  3. Landscape Garden Makeover

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Writing Mechanics
    MAT: Picture Models
    PHIL: Environmental Stewardship; Stewardship
    SOC: Citizenship/Civic Engagement; Communities; Environment; Stewardship
9-12

Healthy Youth, Healthy Community (9-12)

This unit introduces learners to healthy living habits for themselves as well as their community. They demonstrate their knowledge by participating in various activities, making healthy food choices, exercising and helping others in the community do the same. Learners develop a service-learning project based on a community needs assessment. They reflect on their service project, demonstrate the impact on the community, and celebrate their hard work and success. Focus Question: Why is it important to practice healthy living habits and advocate for healthy living practices in a community?

  1. Classroom Community and Good Health

    ELA: Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Communities; Healthy Community
  2. Your Body and Health Issues

    ART: Visual Arts
    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Reflection; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Community; Empower; Needs Assessment; Neighborhood
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  3. Introduction to Service

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Helping; Leadership; Motivation for Giving; Problem Solving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  4. Prepare to Take Action!

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Predicting; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Helping; Leadership; Motivation for Giving; Needs Assessment; Problem Solving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
  5. Take Action!

    ELA: Brainstorming; Journaling; Personal Response; Social/Cultural Issues; Teamwork
    PHIL: Community; Leadership; Motivation for Giving; Problem Solving; Reflection; Responsibility; Service; Volunteer
    SCI: Health; Nutrition
    SOC: Healthy Community
9-12

Helping Refugees

Students will gain insight into what it means to be a refugee and the difficulties refugees face to survive. Students will also explore the role of the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) in their work with refugees and discuss details of its operations. Students will produce a symposium on the work of UNHCR in a virtual online presentation or as a traditional presentation. Focus Question: What is life like for refugees, and how can we help them locally and globally?

  1. How Does it Feel to be a Refugee?

    ELA: Journaling; Letter Writing; Viewpoint
    PHIL: Advocacy; Empathy; Refugees; UNHCR
    SOC: 6 genOn; Civil Society; Developing Countries; Global Issues
  2. Working with Refugees

    ELA: Compare/Contrast; Debate; Group Discussions; Media Genre; Personal Response; Viewing
    PHIL: Advocacy; Commons; Contribute; Empathy; Global Community; Helping; Justice
    SOC: 6 genOn; Common Good; Communities; Developing Countries; Diversity; Geography; Global Issues; Nonprofit; Refugees
  3. Symposium on Refugees

    ELA: Analyze/Interpret; Audience; Electronic Text; Group Discussions; Persuasive Techniques; Presentations; Teamwork
    PHIL: Advocacy; Contribute; Empower; Fundraising; Global Community; Leadership; Reflection; Service
    SOC: 6 genOn; Common Good; Current Events; Developing Countries; Diverse Communities; Global Issues; Human Rights; Refugees; Wants/Needs
9-12

Heroism In Literature

Identifying qualities of a hero in life and literature will enable students to conclude that heroic figures are often depicted as, but do not need to be, “larger than life.” Through readings and becoming familiar with the characters portrayed in Greek mythology and British tales of King Arthur and the Round Table, they will recognize elements of heroism as acts of philanthropy and advocacy for the common good. Students will demonstrate the importance public advocacy for the common good has in developing civic virtue and core democratic values by successfully writing a research based persuasive essay.
Students will reflect cognitively and effectively upon concepts acquired. Knowledge and skills acquired through their service activity will enable students to conduct a needs assessment and design, produce and publish a manual, or service organizations in their community.
  1. What Is a Hero? Heroism in Greek Mythology

    ART-VA: Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary
    ELA: Constructing Meaning; Myths; Nonverbal Communication; Visual Media
    PHIL: 3 genOn; 9/11genOn; Advocacy; Common Good; Time/Talent/Treasure
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Cause/Effect; Inquiry; Point of View
  2. Heroism in English Myth

    ART: Theater: Create/Communicate
    ELA: Author's Style/Purpose; Cause/Effect; Cultural/Historical Contexts; King Arthur; Legend
    PHIL: Advocacy; Altruism; Common Good; Enlightened Self-Interest; Motivation for Giving
    SOC: 10 genOn; 2 genOn; Chronology; Good Character; Personal Virtue
  3. Questioning Our Definition—Acts of Courage

    ELA: Persuasive Techniques; Research; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Common Good; Courage; Sacrifice
    SOC: 10 genOn; Cause/Effect; Core Democratic Values; Peer Review; Research
  4. Heroism—Opportunities for Action

    ART: Visual Arts: Interdisciplinary; Visual Arts: Perform
    ELA: Group Discussions; Research; Response to Text/Others; Writing Mechanics; Writing Process
    PHIL: Advocacy; Community; Foundations; Nonprofit Organizations; Service Project
    SOC: 10 genOn; 11 genOn; 2 genOn; Group Discussions; Inquiry; Primary/Secondary Sources
9-12

How Prophet-able Are You?

Throughout human history there have been social injustices and advocates who have spoken out against them. Learners will determine what constitutes a social problem and cite historical examples of injustice solved by willing participants.

What motivates such advocacy and how can we continue to be advocates, calling society to respect the rights and dignity of its members, promoting justice for all?

  1. What Is Your Gripe?

    PHIL: Values
    SOC: 1 genOn; Justice; Values
  2. Being a Prophet—Traits of the Trade

    PHIL: Advocacy; Pro-Social Behavior; Social Action; Social Justice
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Justice; Values
  3. Ancient Advocates for Change

    ELA: Old Testament; Reflection; Universal Themes
    PHIL: Common Good; Courage; Religious Perspectives
  4. Modern Advocates for Change

    ELA: Group Discussions; Letter Writing; Point of View
    PHIL: Activism; Advocacy; Social Action
    SOC: 1 genOn; Advocacy; Justice; Social Action; Values
9-12

Hurricane Katrina / Great Hanshin-Awaji Disaster Collaboration

The purpose of this unit is to learn why and how natural disasters provide citizens of the world opportunities to help those affected by natural disasters.
As one person, how can I make a difference in the wake of a natural disaster?
  1. Natural Disasters

    PHIL: Caring/Sharing; Contribute; Emergency Response; Helping; LEAGUE Wildcard Lesson: Environment; Relief
    SOC: Compare/Contrast; Disaster: Natural; Environment
  2. Pr