Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement

What's in a Garden?
Lesson 4
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Lesson
Handouts
Academic Standards
Philanthropy Framework

Purpose:

In planning their act of philanthropy, students will identify types of gardens and discuss what is practical for the garden they are planning to build.

Duration:

Two Forty-Minute Class Periods

Objectives:

The learner will:

  • research different types of gardens.
  • make research-based decisions on what will go into the garden.

Service Experience:

Although this lesson contains a service project example, decisions about service plans and implementation should be made by students, as age appropriate.
Learn more about the stages of service-learning.

Students are making decisions related to their gift of a garden to the community.

Materials:

  • Magazines or reference books related to gardening
  • Photographs of gardens
  • Internet access

Instructional Procedure(s):

Anticipatory Set:
Remind students of their chosen purpose for their garden as a gift to the community. Ask them to brainstorm on what kinds of plant material might be suitable for their garden.

 

  • Have students use gardening magazines, photographs, and the Internet to compare different types of gardens. They should note what is recommended for various uses of gardens.

  • A landscape artist, garden club member or representative of a local gardening store may be invited to come in and talk about planning a garden. If this option is used, make sure students have a list of questions ready to ask when the speaker is ready for questions. Suggestions for questions might include:
    • How are gardens laid out?
    • Where should plants be planted? (Shorter plants in front, rows versus broadcasting for naturalization, etc.)
    • What plants grow best in this area?
    • How do you prepare to start the garden?

  • After the area for a garden has been selected, discuss various types of gardens. Remind students of the purpose of their garden. Is it to be a quiet area, bird sanctuary, a recreational area, or how is it to be used?

  • After the students have studied the magazines, etc., and/or listened to the landscape artist or garden club member, have students work in pairs to draw a picture of what they think the garden should look like. Discuss the pictures with the students. Have them identify the best parts of each plan.

Assessment:

  • Pictures the students made can be used to assess whether the students are actively involved in the discussion.
  • Students will write a paragraph in their journals giving their recommendation on how their garden should be laid out.
  • The teacher may observe students' participation as a form of assessment.

School/Home Connection:

None for this lesson.

Bibliographical References:

None for this lesson.

Lesson Developed By:

Christine Makinen
Kaleva Norman Dickson Schools
Wellston Elementary School
Wellston, MI 49689

Handouts:

Philanthropy Framework:

Comments

Wendy, Teacher Muskegon, MI9/18/2007 11:39:53 AM

Great! We are collecting money for (to buy) native plants. The students have to do a job (work) in the neighborhood or in their house.

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