Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement

Cooperative Conjectures
Lesson 3:
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Lesson
Handouts
Academic Standards
Philanthropy Framework

Purpose:

Using technology, students will work in a cooperative team to explore the effects of industrialization on wildlife.

Duration:

Four to Seven Fifty-Minute Class Periods

Objectives:

The learner will:

  • describe the habitats that have evolved since the 1700s.

  • compare and contrast how animals coexist with humans today and in the past.

  • observe industrial changes and how they affect animal life.

  • conduct an inquiry using technology.

  • work as a cooperative group.

  • make and carry out a cohesive plan.

Service Experience:

Although this lesson contains a service project example, decisions about service plans and implementation should be made by students, as age appropriate.
Learn more about the stages of service-learning.
None for this lesson.

Materials:

  • Computer access to internet

  • Student copies of Attachments One through Three

  • Large construction paper or folders, one per student

  • Colored markers

  • Hole punch

Handout 1
Research Cycle: Problem/Phase One
Handout 2
Research Cycle: Needs and Plans/Phase Two
Handout 3
Research Cycle: Conjectures/Phase Three

Instructional Procedure(s):

Anticipatory Set:
Tell the students that you have just purchased a brand-new machine that will help you do your work better (it is only the teacher’s advantage—not the students’). Tell them it may take a while to get used to the changes, but your teaching will be much more efficient when you all get the hang of it. The only problem is that the machine takes up a lot of room and it doesn’t work with the curtains open. Tell the students where you are going to put the new machine so that it will push all their desks into corners. When the machine arrives, they will be cramped and it will be dark, but you can assure them that you will be a more efficient teacher. You will be able to go home earlier and spend less time grading, etc. When you have raised their level of concern, ask them to think about how your announcement is like the effect of industrialization on animals and their habitats.

  • Challenge the students to find out more about the effects of industrialization on animals and their habitats. Tell them that they will return to their literature circle groups and begin an inquiry search. The first goal of the group is to come to consensus about some central questions. Then, they will devise a plan that will allow each member to take an active role in the investigation. Finally, each group must decide how to present the group findings...through a role play, art work, charts or by writing an original rap, or presenting a power point show, etc.
  • Give each student the three handouts and a folder to keep them in. (Or fold large construction paper in half to form a loose folder.) Have students label their folder CITY WILDLIFE INQUIRY JOURNAL. They should put their notes from the two handouts in the previous lessons in the folder as well. (Allow a few minutes to label and decorate the folders.)

  • The directions on the handouts will guide the students in their team project which will take several days. Several times, the teacher should lead a discussion about how things are going, teamwork, sharing resources, exciting information, and other issues that develop. Encourage groups to share their ideas for research with the rest of the class. Invite two groups to share research ideas if their topics are similar or compatible. Refer back to literature circle information gathered as another resource.

  • In Lesson Four: Stop, Look, and Listen the students continue their research, and they make their presentations in Lesson Five: Lights, Camera, Action.

  • Teacher Note – If students are not familiar with presentation software for the computer, it is advisable to instruct them during a mini lesson. Be sure to share with students the rubric for the presentations, found in Lesson Five, Attachment Two.

Assessment:

  • Informal Assessment: Observe students’ teamwork, organizational skills and contributions to the group. Check to see that groups are recording their ideas and discussing strategies for gathering information.
  • Use the following rubrics for assessing the group work:

Needs Improvement

Satisfactory

Good

Excellent

With help, identifies things he/she wonders about in relation to topic.

Expresses curiosity about topic, with help translates into specific questions.

Posses interesting problems for research; with help refines it into a researchable question.
 

Identifies things he/she wonders about and translates it into a researchable question.

Making Conjectures Rubric

Needs Improvement

Satisfactory

Good

Excellent

Offers conjectures that are mainly expressions of fact or opinion.
 

Offers conjectures that partially address the research question.

Offers conjectures that address the research question with guesses.

Offers reasonable conjectures that address the question and can be proved through further research.


 

School/Home Connection:

None for this lesson.

Cross-Curriculum Extensions:

None for this lesson.

Bibliographical References:

  • McGraw-Hill. SRA - Open Court Reading. Vol. 2, Level 3. Columbus: SRA/McGraw-Hill, 2002. ISBN: 0075696525

  • McGraw-Hill. SRA -Open Court Reading Inquiry Journal. Level 3:28-41. Columbus: SRA/McGraw, 2002. ISBN: 007569571

Lesson Developed By:

Greta Hendricks Johnson
Detroit Public Schools
Van Zile Elementary School
Detroit, MI 48234

Handouts:

Handout 1Print Handout 1

Research Cycle: Problem/Phase One

Before you meet with your cooperative group to focus your research, think and write by yourself
about the issue of industrialization and changing habitats.


What is a good question to research? (Think of past solutions to problems, stewardship, long-term consequences,
adaptation to environment, modification of environment, changing geography, etc.)


__________________________________________________________________________________________



__________________________________________________________________________________________



__________________________________________________________________________________________



Why is this an interesting research question? (Think of local issues, personal interest, resources, taking action, etc.


__________________________________________________________________________________________



__________________________________________________________________________________________



__________________________________________________________________________________________



__________________________________________________________________________________________



Think of some other questions related to this problem. What else do you wonder about?


__________________________________________________________________________________________



__________________________________________________________________________________________



__________________________________________________________________________________________

Handout 2Print Handout 2

Research Cycle: Needs and Plans/Phase Two

Meet with your group and share your personal questions from Attachment One. Come to a consensus
about which question/problem to research together. Assign jobs to each member of the group. Fill out
this form and start the research.


Our problem/question:__________________________________________________________________________



____________________________________________________________________________________________



____________________________________________________________________________________________



Knowledge Needs: What information do we need in order to help investigate our problem?



A.__________________________________________________________________________________________



B.__________________________________________________________________________________________



C.__________________________________________________________________________________________



D.__________________________________________________________________________________________



E.__________________________________________________________________________________________



F.__________________________________________________________________________________________



Group Members

Main Jobs





















Handout 3Print Handout 3

Research Cycle: Conjectures/Phase Three

After each member has completed his or her job, meet to share information. Then on your own, write a description of the big question and make a thoughtful conjecture (an inference based on incomplete information). The conjecture should address the question and can be proved through further research.


What is the big question that your group is researching?


________________________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________________________



What is your conjecture (first theory or explanation)?


________________________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________________________

Philanthropy Framework:

Comments

Mathew, Media Specialist Culver City, CA4/4/2007 11:15:45 PM

Great lesson!

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