Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement

Jackie Robinson, A Black Hero
Lesson 1:
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Lesson
Handouts
Academic Standards
Philanthropy Framework

Purpose:

This lesson will introduce the children to a hero whose actions changed the course of history. Students will describe what they learned about being a hero and relate some of the characteristics of heroes to a personal hero. While written for a Catholic Elementary School, this lesson may be easily adapted for public school use.

Duration:

Three Thirty-Minute Class Periods

Objectives:

The learner will:
  • explain how one person can make a significant difference in the lives of many others, while acting for the common good.

  • describe Jackie Robinson's personal courage in opening the door for other black professional sports players.

  • demonstrate through writing that citizens have a responsibility for the common good.

Materials:

  • The Children's Book of Heroes by William J. Bennett

     
  • Student copies of Handout One: Jackie Robinson Quiz (Spanish version, Attachment Two)

     
  • Drawing paper for designing a postage stamp

     
  • Picture of Jackie Robinson (optional)

     
  • Baseball, baseball cap, mitt, or bat

 

Handout 1
Jackie Robinson Quiz
Handout 2
Prueba de Jackie Robinson

Instructional Procedure(s):

Anticipatory Set:

The teacher will wear a baseball cap and/or glove and teach the class to sing "Take Me Out to the Ball Game." Ask the students what they know about the sport of baseball. Allow them to share their experiences of playing on a baseball team or on a team for another sport.

  • Read the story of Jackie Robinson from The Children's Book of Heroes. Discuss the challenges Robinson faced and how he responded to the challenges. In what ways is Jackie Robinson a hero? How did he affect the future of baseball?

  • Have a discussion about Jackie Robinson and incorporate the following questions:

    • What actions were examples of Mr. Robinson acting for the common good?

    • How has he helped to enhance a core democratic value?

    Discuss the importance of showing respect for others.

  • Have the students take a multiple-choice quiz about Jackie Robinson (Attachment One).

  • Brainstorm as a class the characteristics of a hero. List these on the board. Prompt students to think not only of Jackie Robinson, but also of their own heroes and heroes in the community. Guide the students to form a working definition of a hero.

  • The class will create a classroom or hallway bulletin board or display, gathering and recording information about the life of Jackie Robinson. Have the students look for images, facts, essays, and statistics about Jackie Robinson. As they collect data, they can respond thoughtfully to the information in some way: through art, poems, essays, etc. Be sure to teach the students about proper documentation of sources.

  • Discuss the definition of philanthropy and talk about the responsibility of--and benefits to--citizens to act for the common good. Ask students to write a paragraph defending the statement that "one person can make a difference." What does it mean and what evidence is there that it is true?

  • The post office has put the images of many great people on postage stamps as a tribute to their contributions to society. Ask each student to think of a personal hero who matches some of the listed characteristics. Have each student design a stamp for his or her hero. Below their stamps, students should write about the hero, identifying three characteristics of that person that makes him or her a hero.

Assessment:

Students will take a short quiz about the life of Jackie Robinson. They will research and summarize information about the life of Jackie Robinson. The paragraph should demonstrate their understanding of the importance and responsibility of citizens to act for the common good. Students will design a postage stamp of a personal hero and write about the attributes of the hero.

Cross-Curriculum Extensions:

  • The learners could gather and record information about the life of Jackie Robinson. Have the students look for images, facts, essays, and statistics about Jackie Robinson. As they collect data, they can respond thoughtfully to the information in some way: through art, recordings, power-point presentations, poems, essays, etc.
  • Students may attend a local baseball game or play a baseball game against another class in the school.

Bibliographical References:

Lesson Developed By:

Valerie Williams
Catholic Diocese of Grand Rapids
St. Alphonsus Elementary School
Grand Rapids, MI 49505

Handouts:

Handout 1Print Handout 1

Jackie Robinson Quiz

How much do you know about Jackie Robinson?

1. Jackie Robinson played ball in _____.
a. 1986
b. 1975
c. 1945

2. Jackie Robinson played _____.
a. Baseball
b. Football
c. Basketball

3. Jackie Robinson played for _____.
a. Detroit Tigers
b. Brooklyn Dodgers
c. Milwaukee Braves

4. Jackie Robinson ___________________ when he played baseball.
a. got into fights
b. was called bad names
c. was supported by his fans

5. Jackie Robinson was a hero because ______________.
a. he made millions of dollars.
b. he didn't let his problems stop him from doing the right thing.
c. he was a super baseball player.

Handout 2Print Handout 2

Prueba de Jackie Robinson

¿Cuánto sabes acerca de Jackie Robinson?

1. Jackie Robinson jugó en _____.
a. 1986
b. 1975
c. 1945

2. Jackie Robinson jugó _____.
a. Béisbol
b. Fútlbol Americano
c. Basquetbol/Baloncesto

3.
Jackie Robinson jugó con _____.
a. Detroit Tigers
b. Brooklyn Dodgers
c. Milwaukee Braves

4.
Jackie Robinson ___________________ cuando jugó béisbol.
a. se metió en peleas
b. le llamaron nombres feos
c. fue apoyado por sus aficionados

5. Jackie Robinson fue un héroe porque ______________.
a. hizo millones de dólares.
b. no dejó que sus problemas le impidieran hacer lo correcto.
c. era un jugador super estrella en el béisbol.

Philanthropy Framework:

Comments

Tom, Educator Muskegon, MI4/26/2007 10:37:23 AM

I liked how philanthropy was identified at home, classroom, school, and community. The story Miss Ruphius was great. Helping Out Is Cool was a good way to get discussion going.

Lisa, Teacher Canton, MI10/27/2007 1:11:30 PM

(The positive aspect of using this lesson was) students liked talking about different types of heroes. The quizes were a nice touch.

Antje, Teacher Muskegon, MI10/27/2007 1:13:42 PM

(The positive aspect of using this lesson was) the strong focus on what "really" makes a person a hero. The kids really enjoyed learning about Jackie Robinson. They especially enjoyed working in groups and doing the posters.

Marilyn, Teacher St Charles, MI10/27/2007 1:16:51 PM

(The positive aspect of using this lesson was it) works well with biography study and Black History Month, Women in History, Famous Americans. I liked this lesson.

Catherine, LEAGUE Coach Newark, NJ2/3/2011 1:09:18 PM

I found that many of the students had never heard of Jackie Robinson or the Negro Leagues. They were amazed and shocked at the treatment he received, especially from his own teammates. The students asked many questions as to why a person would let himself be subjected to those conditions just to play baseball. Many remarked, "I would have quit and never played baseball again!"

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Unit Contents:

Overview:Heroes and Their Impact Summary

Lessons:

1.
Jackie Robinson, A Black Hero
2.
Mother Teresa
3.
Rosa Parks

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