Food for Thought: Hunger—Around the Block, Around the World

Unit of 4 Lessons
Grade Levels: 
9
10
11
12
Subjects: 
Arts
Language Arts
Library / Technology
Science
Health and PE
Social Studies
Issue Area: 
Hunger (poverty)
Focus Question 

Focus Question: How might individuals and society address the issues of poverty, homelessness and hunger, and their underlying causes? 

Unit Overview 

Learners describe proper nutrition and compare their own eating habits with what is recommended by experts. They define hunger and malnutrition and identify local organizations from the four sectors of society (business, government, nonprofit, and family) that provide food for the hungry. 

Service Experience 
Learners will make a list of "Ten Tips for Healthy Eating" and share the information with other learners through public address announcements, skits, raps, posters, newspaper articles or other techniques. Learners will have a field trip to a food pantry and help to organize a Harvest for Hunger campaign at their school.
Lessons in This Unit 
Unit: 
Food for Thought: Hunger—Around the Block, Around the World
Lesson 1 of 4
Grades: 
9
10
11
12

Learners will describe what constitutes good nutritional practices, compare their own eating patterns to these practices and encourage others to improve their own eating habits. They will determine the value of acting on behalf of others and decide if their actions can make a difference in the school.

Unit: 
Food for Thought: Hunger—Around the Block, Around the World
Lesson 2 of 4
Grades: 
9
10
11
12

Learners will describe how hunger and malnutrition are related, but not the same problems. They will recognize hunger as a universal theme in literature and analyze the role of the four sectors of society in solving problems of hunger in the community.

Unit: 
Food for Thought: Hunger—Around the Block, Around the World
Lesson 3 of 4
Grades: 
9
10
11
12

Depictions of hunger in excerpts from Jane Eyre and Oliver Twist provide concrete images of hunger as learners determine its causes and decide whether to support a change in U.S. public policy related to the issue.

Unit: 
Food for Thought: Hunger—Around the Block, Around the World
Lesson 4 of 4
Grades: 
9
10
11
12

Learners will distinguish between the many different approaches to hunger in the United States and abroad by looking at governmental versus nonprofit programs. They will describe the importance of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in dealing with the problem of hunger and reflect on the importance of philanthropic actions in solving the problems of hunger in the world.