How Do You Spend Your Time?

Grades: 
3, 4, 5

Students learn four choices they can make with money and compare this to how they spend their time. They recognize that volunteering requires freedom of choice.

Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
One 45-Minute Session
Objectives 

The learner will:

  • define positive and negative incentives.
  • identify four ways to manage money and compare to ways they spend their time.
  • recognize that volunteering requires freedom of choice.
  • identify examples of families supporting giving and sharing.
Materials 
  • paper and colored pencils
  • compass for each student (for drawing circles)
  • ruler for each student
Vocabulary 
  • common good: working together for the benefit of everyone
  • save: to keep or put aside for future access
  • invest: to put resources, such as money, in an account or in an organization for the purpose of growing the resources’ value and/or impact
  • spend: to use money or resources for something you want or need
  • donate: to give time, talent or resources for a charitable purpose with no expectation of something in return
  • incentive: positive or negative factors that motivate or influence people

Instructions

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  1. Anticipatory Set:

    Have students raise their hands if they have responsibilities at home, such as walking a dog, cleaning, taking out the trash, caring for siblings, or cooking. Have a discussion about types of chores they have, how much time they spend at them, and whether they earn allowance.

  2. Ask, "Does everyone in this group have the same responsibilities at home? Why or why not?" Discuss whether that is fair.Discuss whetherstudents think there should be laws about exactly what each child should do at every age (their rights and responsibilities). Wouldn't that be fair?" Discuss the positive and negative effects of such laws. Lead students to recognize that they value having choices.

  3. Tell students that every family has different expectations for how children spend their time. Discuss the ways students show responsibility for their families (follow rules, care for siblings, take responsibility for chores, etc.).Have students shareexamples of ways their families support giving and sharing.

  4. As a group,brainstorm how they spend their time in a typical week. Have them list general categories of activities (examples: sleep, school, chores, active play, TV, helping others, homework).

  5. Then have each student estimate how much time he or she spends doing each activity in an averageweek. The quantity may be written in hours or percentages.Haveeach studentmake a pie graph showing how they spend their time.

  6. Display their graphs and allow students to compare and contrast their time with other students.

  7. Help students recognize they have choiceabout how to spend their time (with boundaries), and volunteering requires freedom of choice. Tell themthatthe choices of how they spend their timeare very much like the choices people have with how to spend their money.

  8. Introduce four things people can do with their money and discuss the differences:

    • Save: to keep or put aside for future use.
    • Invest:to put resources, such as money, in an account or in an organization for the purpose of growing the resources’ value and/or impact.
    • Spend:to use money for something you want or need.
    • Donate:to give time, talent or treasure with no expectation of something in return.
  9. Ask students how these four ways fo spending money are related to ways they spend their time. For example, they may argue that sleeping is like investing because they are setting aside their energy and growing it to use later. Or they may argue that time spent helping others is like donating. Promote creative discussion. Have them support their ideas with a rationale (knowing that there isn't just one correct answer in this discussion).

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.I Definitions of Philanthropy
    1. Standard DP 02. Roles of Government, Business, and Philanthropy
      1. Benchmark E.5 Recognize that volunteering requires freedom of choice.
    2. Standard DP 06. Role of Family in Philanthropy
      1. Benchmark E.2 Identify examples of families supporting giving and sharing.

Academic Standards

Select categories to search for standards.

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