Current Events

The events at the border are alarming and confusing right now. Learning to Give is dedicated to helping young people learn their role in civil society. An important role is staying informed and taking action when we see injustice. Voting is the most powerful way we use our voices; and young people have a voting voice, even if they are not voting age.

Discussions about Current Events: What Can Young People Do?

Every day there are opportunities to discuss our role in civil society and decide whether and how to get involved in current events. At Learning to Give, we want to help students learn and practice taking action for the common good—yes, this too is philanthropy. This page provides tools and tips related to current events. Look here to involve your students' voice and action to make a difference.

From holidays to elections to triumphs to tragedies, there is always something going on that can spark conversations about what we can do as informed, responsible and generous students.


Find tips and resources about addressing challenging issues in the classroom. Follow these guidelines to establish a safe environment, promote respectful dialogue, back up arguments with facts, and talk about news and current events with students: Difficult Conversations 

Help your students evaluate the roles of media, bias, “facts”, and critical thinking related to current events and controversial topics: Media Literacy Tips


Today's Current Event: Voting - Eyes On Youth

The youth vote is front and center in the current political climate and election scene. Millennials will soon be the largest single voting block and post-millennials are not far behind. In addition to these numbers, their activism and rejection of conventional party politics have been widely reported.

Young voters tend to be much more diverse and progressive than previous generations. A recent analysis shows an increase in voter registration among young people, especially in swing states. (Additional References: People Press and Washington Post)

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Source: United States Election Project 

Youth in Numbers  

According to one analysis, approximately 50% of eligible young people—about 24 million youth, ages 18-29—voted in the 2016 general election. Turnout in off-year elections has historically been especially low-even among young voters.  By one estimate, in 2014,  only one-fifth of young people (ages 18-29) participated in that year’s midterm elections—the lowest youth turnout ever recorded by the Census.

With so much riding on the outcomes of the midterms and many close races expected, the major political parties will be courting the youth vote with gusto. It’s not too early to educate and guide your students to be aware of the top issues, understand their perspectives, and make their voices heard. By the November midterms, some students will be on college campuses, where confusion about how and where to register and vote is pervasive. The Campus Vote Project provides information for students through state-specific guides.

If your students are not of voting age, they still have the power to influence and share their voice! The resources below will give you the support you need to lead conversations, activities, and lessons about voting, civic participation, and the power of voice and choice.

National Voter Registration Day is September 11. Students can encourage people to register. More information.

Resources

Activity and Class Discussion Tip

Administer a short survey to get students thinking about the topic of voting that then leads into a discussion about voting and civic engagement. (Be sure to view our Difficult Conversations guide to help you navigate the discussion). Include questions such as: 

  1. Do you plan to vote or not when you’re 18?
  2. On a scale of 1-10, with 1 being totally unimportant and 10 being of the utmost importance, how important is voting to you?
  3. What is the most important political issue to you and why?
  4. What comes to mind when I say: “Democratic Party” or “Republican Party”? What platforms do they have and how are they different?
  5. What questions do you have about voting?

What can young people do right now?

  • Host a World Café Conversation (“engaging people in conversations that matter”) for your school/community. Here are some free World Café resources.
  • Be an advocate for your POV: Share carefully researched facts and possible solutions with your network and local government.
  • Use and teach listening skills to find common ground as you have difficult conversations about issues with strong differences of opinion. We are more alike than different.

In the News

Organizations

 

Sustainable Development Goals and Current Events

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Sustainable Development Goals and Current Events

We are all connected in a global community, and the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call us as global citizens to action to make a better future for everyone. In order to be successful in reaching these goals, all citizens need to be aware of what the issues are and ways to take action. This mini-course helps students narrow which goal they are passionate to adopt.

Teacher-created philanthropy education lessons magnify the impact of any academic content with themes of generosity, community, and civic and social responsibility. Perfect base for PBL, service-learning, and student-centered instruction. Lessons align to state standards, including Common Core State Standards, and some international standards.

Every day there are opportunities to discuss our role in civil society and decide whether and how to get involved in current events. At Learning to Give, we want to help students learn and practice taking action for the common good—yes, this too is philanthropy. This page provides tools and tips related to current events. Look here to involve your students' voice and action to make a difference.