Community Table-Community Ties

Grades: 
3, 4, 5

Students brainstorm community needs and how they may be addressed. They explore why taking action is good for the giver, the person receiving the gift, and the community. They make a plan and take action to address a community need related to hunger or homelessness.

Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
PrintOne 50 minute class period
Objectives 

The learner will:

  • define the term philanthropy.
  • define the term common good.
  • describe the philanthropic activities occurring within the community.
  • identify needs in the community.
  • brainstorm ways community needs could be met.
Materials 
  • T-Chart withthe headings "Community Needs" and "Solutions"
  • Book or stories where character(s) demonstrate philanthropy (action for common good)
    • Lied, Kate. Potato: A Tale From the Great Depression. National Geographic Society, 2002. ISBN: 792269462
    • McGovern, Ann. Stone Soup. Scholastic Trade Books, 1986. ISBN: 0590416022
    • DiSalvo-Ryan, DyAnne. Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen. Mulberry Books, 1997. ISBN: 688152856
Teacher Preparation 

It is important to be sensitive to the possibility that someone in your class may have some personal experience with homelessness, hunger and poverty.

Reflection 

How can you let other people know when you care about an issue? What are the different ways we communicate?

Bibliography 
  • Lied, Kate. Potato: A Tale From the Great Depression. National Geographic Society, 2002. ISBN: 792269462
  • McGovern, Ann. Stone Soup. Scholastic Trade Books, 1986. ISBN: 0590416022
  • DiSalvo-Ryan, DyAnne. Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen. Mulberry Books, 1997. ISBN: 688152856
     

Instructions

Print
  1. Anticipatory Set: Tell the children to close their eyes and think about the birds as well as the other animals that live outdoors. Ask, "How do they get their food? Where do they live? What is their shelter in different kinds of weather? What happens to the animals when winter comes? Do animals help other animals find shelter or food?"

  2. Explain that people have needs similar to other living things; people and animals need food and shelter. When people in the community don't have resources to meet their needs (they are hungry or homeless), other people in the community can find ways to help them. People can be philanthropists and give their time, talent, or treasure to help others who don't have what they need. Ask students why they think people help each other and animals don't.

  3. Ask, What happens when people have needs but don't have the resources to meet those needs? How do people take care of the needs of others?

  4. Display a T-Chart with the headings "Community Needs" and "Solutions."Allow time for the students to give suggestions of some of the Community Needs that they can think of and possible Solutions of how those needs might be met.

  5. Record the students' suggestions on the T-Chart.

  6. Review the definition of philanthropy - giving time, talent or treasure for the common good. Explain that treasure is usually considered money, but it can also be giving things, for example, food, coats, hats, mittens, or other items of clothing.

  7. Read aloud one of the suggested stories and discuss the examples of caring for others.Talk about why they performed the service and how it affects the giver, the person receiving the gift, and the community.

  8. Discuss the definition of the term common good. Guide them to the understanding that common good involves individual citizens having the commitment and motivation to promote the welfare of the community (even if they must sacrifice their own time, personal preferences or money) to work together with other members for the greater benefit of all.

  9. Review whether the actions from the story were for the common good. How did the action(s) serve the community?

  10. Ask the students to brainstorm what they might do to meet the needs in their own community. Use this list to come to consensus on a student-led service project. "What can we do to meet a specific need in our community?" For example, they may create a brochure to tell people in the community about a nonprofit organization that serves people who are hungry or homeless. They can give highlights of a resource or service that they may use or donate to.

Assessment 

Teacher observation of student participation and group interaction will serve as the assessment for this lesson.

Cross Curriculum 

Students may take action to address the issue of hunger or homelessness in their community.

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.I Definitions of Philanthropy
    1. Standard DP 01. Define Philanthropy
      1. Benchmark E.1 Define philanthropy as the giving and sharing of time, talent, or treasure intended for the common good.
  2. Strand PHIL.II Philanthropy and Civil Society
    1. Standard PCS 02. Diverse Cultures
      1. Benchmark E.5 Identify the relationship between individual rights and community responsibility.
  3. Strand PHIL.III Philanthropy and the Individual
    1. Standard PI 01. Reasons for Individual Philanthropy
      1. Benchmark E.4 Give an example of how citizens act for the common good.