Dividing the Philanthropic Shares

Grades: 
3, 4, 5

This lesson will emphasize the various kinds of nonprofits in specific geographic regions and examine why volunteers are needed in the community.

Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
PrintTwo to Three Forty-Five Minute Periods
Objectives 

The learner will:

  • define volunteerism and describe how volunteers play an important role in community services.
  • map nonprofits within a 10-mile radius from the school neighborhood.
Materials 
  • Laura Smith Haviland (see Attachment One)
  • List of nonprofits/volunteer efforts in the community (include names of hospitals, museums, libraries, symphony, and special interest groups e.g. American Cancer Society, Public Television Station, Neighborhood/Community Service Organization, Habitat for Humanity, Salvation Army, Meals on Wheels, etc., or key your local zip codes into the search engine on http://www.guidestar.org as an excellent nonprofit reference source)
  • Reference map of city/community
  • Telephone Directory
  • Internet access
  • A copy of Helping Out is Cool
Home Connection 

Student should list jobs from home and school that are done voluntarily.

Bibliography 
  • Web site: http://www.guidestar.org May be used to check for searching by zip code for local nonprofits.
  • Web site: http://learningtogive.org Click on resources, then, click on Foundations/Philanthropic Org.
  • Fugate, Sandy. For the Benefit of All: A History of Philanthropy in America. Michigan: W.K. Kellogg Foundation, 1997.
  • Moss, Ellen Feinman. Helping Out is Cool. Ontario: Tumbleweed Press, 1997.

Instructions

Print
  1. Anticipatory Set:Ask: How many students have a "job" or chores to do at home? Who gets an allowance? Who is expected to help out just because you are a member of the family? Should members of the family be "paid" to help out? Does every job done require payment? Which jobs do not receive pay? Would you do a job without receiving payment?

  2. Write the words nonprofit (any not-for-profit or tax exempt organization that is specifically not associated with any government, government agency, or commercial enterprise), tax-exempt, service, commercial enterprise, profit, and volunteer (one who offers himself for a service of his own free will) on the board. Allow teams of 3-4 students to brainstorm, defining each term. Solicit definitions and place the clearest definition of each term on the board. Explain how nonprofits use volunteers to complete tasks, jobs for the common good of many individuals.

  3. Read Helping Out is Cool. Discuss how volunteerism helped others in the community. Are volunteers found in more places than described in the book? What kinds of places have volunteers? Who is likely to volunteer in the community? Why do people volunteer?

  4. What do you think would happen if no one volunteered? How would it affect life in the community? Share Laura Smith Haviland (see Attachment One). Discuss the idea that when people volunteer, everyone benefits.

  5. Tell students that they will be responsible for locating 15 nonprofits in their community. List the criteria for assessment on the board or in a prominent place in the classroom for reference. Sketch a map of the community locating major streets. Complete the map by adding 15 nonprofit locations. (Resource materials or search capabilities should be provided.) The map should include a map key, with numbered locations. In addition, on a separate sheet of paper, students should prepare a summary of three-four sentences to explain each nonprofit's significance to the community and types of services that the volunteers provide.

Assessment 

The map and summary will serve as an assessment for the lesson. Rubric for Mapping Nonprofits 0 Points 1 Point 2 Points 3 Points 4 Points Map has key, less than 7 numbered locations. Summary is written with/without complete sentences and explains one or two out of the four requested components. Map has key, 8-10 numbered locations. Summary is written with/without complete sentences and explains two out of the four requested components. Map has key, 9-12 numbered locations. Summary is written with/without complete sentences and explains two out of the four requested components. Map has key, 10-12 numbered locations. Summary is written using complete sentences and explains three out of the four requested components. Map has key, 12-15 numbered locations. Summary is written using complete sentences and explains three out of the four requested components.

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.I Definitions of Philanthropy
    1. Standard DP 03. Names and Types of Organizations within the Civil Society Sector
      1. Benchmark E.1 Name and recognize the civil society sector as a separate part of the community.
  2. Strand PHIL.II Philanthropy and Civil Society
    1. Standard PCS 07. Skills of Civic Engagement
      1. Benchmark E.2 Discuss an issue affecting the common good in the classroom or school and demonstrate respect and courtesy for differing opinions.