Private Resources for the Common Good

Unit of 2 Lessons
Grade Levels: 
9
10
11
12
Subjects: 
Language Arts
Philanthropy
Social Studies
Media / Technology
Arts Education
Focus Question 
This unit will make comparisons between historic philanthropic persons who have exemplified giving, sharing and taking action for the common good and those of the present day who are also voluntarily contributing to specific causes and the common good. The present day philanthropists are winners of the Robert W. Scrivner Award, an award given to a grantmaker who has demonstrated creativity, risk-taking, innovation and an entrepreneurial spirit. The award is administered by the Council on Foundations.
Unit Overview 

Using two works of art, students will make comparisons between historic and present-day philanthropic endeavors. They will analyze the contributions of Robert W. Scrivner to modern philanthropy through his work on the Rockefeller Family Fund and recognize how the work of each Robert W. Scrivner Award winner carries on his legacy. In Lesson Two Historic and contemporary Hispanic philanthropists are the focus.

Service Experience 
 Lesson Two:After studying the work of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, the learners will illustrate “non-violence quotations” and share them in a school-wide display. Options are also included for a gleaning project or a school-wide assembly on conflict resolution.
Lessons in This Unit 
Unit: 
Private Resources for the Common Good
Lesson 1 of 2
Grades: 
9
10
11
12

Students will describe the paradox of industrialist John D. Rockefeller a turn of the century monopolist and a generous philanthropist. They will give examples of how his philanthropy continues today through the work of the foundations that survived him. Robert W. Scrivner’s contribution to a better world, through his work with the Rockefeller Family Fund, will be analyzed.

Unit: 
Private Resources for the Common Good
Lesson 2 of 2
Grades: 
9
10
11
12

The learners will investigate the roles of contemporary and historic Latino philanthropists. They will look at a creative approach to "capacity building" in Latino organizations as created by the 2003 winners of the Robert W. Scrivner Award for Creative Grantmaking: Aida Rodriguez, Barbara A. Taveras, Luz A. Vega-Marquis, and Magui Rubalcava, and by looking at the work of César Chávez and Dolores Huerta in the farm labor movement within the historical context of Latino activism in the United States.