Traditions of Tribal Sharing

Grades: 
3, 4, 5

This lesson gives examples of the tradition of Native American tribal giving and sharing and helps students identify talents they possess that could be used to help others.

Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
PrintOne 45-Minute Class Session
Objectives 

The learner will:

  • define the term philanthropy as "private action for the common good."
  • identify the philanthropic actions of a character in a fiction story about Native Americans.
  • cite examples of Native American giving and sharing.
  • illustrate an attribute they possess and would use to make a contribution to a world culture.
Materials 
  • a social studies text that includes information about the traditions of Native Americans
  • copy of handout: Native Americans, Traditions of Tribal Sharing
  • fiction or non-fiction stories of Native Americans whose character(s) demonstrate private action for the public or common good.
Bibliography 
  • De Paola, Tomie. The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush. Paper Star, 1996. ISBN: 0698113608.
  • Goble, Paul. The Gift of the Sacred Dog: Story and Illustrations (Reading Rainbow Book). Aladdin Paperbacks Reprint Edition, 1984. ISBN: 0020432801.
  • DePaolo, Tomie. The Legend of the Bluebonnet. Paper Star, 1996. ISBN: 0698113594.

Instructions

Print
  1. Anticipatory Set:

    Review the term philanthropy (private action for the common good). As you study the history of your community and the influence of Native Americans, pose the question: "How were Native Americans helpful and generous?" Brainstorm ideas.

  2. Read and discuss one fiction or non-fiction book (see Bibliography).

  3. Introduce vocabulary word attribute: a quality or characteristic belonging to a person or thing.

  4. Read and discuss Native Americans, Traditions of Tribal Sharing (handout). Discuss the following questions:

    1. What gift would you give another?
    2. What would you contribute to a world culture if you could give your finest attribute?
  5. Brainstorm attributes and list on chart paper or blackboard. Examples of attributes might include: art, music, athletics, cooking, and craftsmanship, as well as some non-material attributes such as honesty, hard work, hospitality, respect, sense of adventure, loyalty, family loyalty.

  6. Ask students to choose one attribute they possess and would offer as a gift or contribution to a world culture.

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.II Philanthropy and Civil Society
    1. Standard PCS 02. Diverse Cultures
      1. Benchmark E.1 Give examples of philanthropic traditions of diverse cultures.