Oral Presentation

Grades: 
6, 7, 8

Students will share their experiences volunteering for a philanthropic organization with others.

Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
PrintTwo Forty-Minute Class Periods
Objectives 

Students will list and describe the characteristics of a powerful speaker and then prepare a ten-minute informational speech.

Materials 
  • The Social Action Project Final Assessment (Attachments One - Seven)
  • How to Interpret Your Child's Results (Attachment Eight)
Bibliography 

Sebranek, Patrick, Verne Meyer and Dave Kemper. WriteSource 2000: A Guide to Writing, Thinking and Learning. Wilmington, MA: D.C. Heath and Co., 1995, Sections 389-401, Preparing a Speech.

Instructions

Print
  1. Anticipatory Set: Tell students to close their eyes and ask them to form a mental picture of someone they consider a powerful speaker. Have them note characteristics about their person’s manner while speaking. Ask students to open their eyes and share the name of the person they visualized as well as list some of the characteristics they noted.

  2. Add to the students' list any of the characteristics of a powerful speaker they may have missed. Show a videotape of two speakers (possibly political figures) and contrast them. Lead the students in a discussion about the qualities of a good speech.

  3. Assign a ten-minute speech that students will share with parents and peers on Social Action Night. This event will allow students to share their work with their parents, the school and the community. The speech should share students' experiences volunteering for a philanthropic organization and should include a visual (perhaps a slide show, a video, or a poster). This class period should be used to allow students to write, rehearse, and revise their speeches and to work on creating visual displays. Those who finish their speeches should practice delivering their speeches to other students.

Assessment 

Oral presentations will be judged according to the following rubrics: An exceptional oral presentation is one where the speaker actively engages the audience using a clear, loud expressive voice and constant eye contact. Information will be organized in a logical way and the visuals are appropriate and engaging. A proficient presentation is one where the speaker might not have fulfilled all of these elements all of the time. A limited presentation might be from a student who has not adequately prepared. The Social Action Project Rubrics for all activities are included. See The Social Action Project Final Assessment (Attachments One - Seven) and How to Interpret Your Child's Results (Attachment Eight).

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.IV Volunteering and Service
    1. Standard VS 05. Integrating the Service Experience into Learning
      1. Benchmark MS.3 Identify outcomes from the service.