Resources and Trade Flow

Grades: 
3, 4, 5

The students will identify what natural resources, human capital, and capital equipment are needed to complete the chosen service learning project. They will also trace the origin of the pieces of clothing donated for the project and the possible trade flows that brought them to the United States.

Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
PrintOne Forty-Five Minute Class Period
Objectives 

The learner will:

  • distinguish between natural resources, human capital, and capital equipment in the production of a good or a service.
  • trace the origin of clothing and the possible trade flows which brought them to the United States.
Materials 
  • Vocabulary (see Attachment One)
  • Donated clothing (preferably 100% woven cotton)
  • World map
  • Chart paper
Bibliography 

dePaola, Tomie. Charlie Needs a Cloak. Aladdin Paperbacks, 1988. ISBN: 0671664670 Summary: A shepherd shears his sheep, cards and spins the wool, weaves and dyes the cloth, and sews a beautiful new red cloak.

Instructions

Print
  1. Anticipatory Set: Tell the children that now that they have chosen the service learning project they will need to determine what materials will be needed to complete it. (Refer to specific project background information for quilt specifications.)

     

  2. As a group, ask the children to list the materials needed. Explain that students will be using the benefits of having the whole class contribute their time, talent and treasure to the project to make it work. Ask students to name the benefits of having the whole class work on this project rather than a few students.

  3. Put the following words on the chalkboard or chart paper:

    • capital equipment
    • consumers
    • goods
    • human capital
    • markets
    • natural resources
    • producers
    • services
    • trade/exchange
    • trade flow
  4. Define them (see Attachment One) and give examples of each of the words from the quilt project.

  5. Make a new list on chart paper with three headings: natural resources, human capital, and capital equipment. Have students place examples under each heading. Keep the chart displayed throughout the unit.

  6. Ask students to look at the labels inside of the clothing they brought to determine where it was made (produced). Help children locate the countries and continent of production on a world map and discuss the possible trade flows that brought their items to the United States.

Assessment 

The teacher will observe active participation by all students.

Handouts

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.II Philanthropy and Civil Society
    1. Standard PCS 01. Self, citizenship, and society
      1. Benchmark E.3 Describe a benefit of group cooperation.