Who Can We Help?

Grades: 
K, 1, 2
Students will determine which group would be in need of their talents.
Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
PrintOne Forty-Five Minute Class Period
Objectives 
The learner will:
  • cooperatively determine who could use the help of the class.
Materials 
  • Chart paper and markers
  • Paper or stationery and pencils
Home Connection 
Students could be asked to ask their families for suggestions of groups in the community that may be in need of their talents. (Often family members are involved with groups that may need the help of students.)

Instructions

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  1. Instructional Procedure(s):

    Teacher Note:

    Groups or individuals that might need help could be right in the school building. A note could be sent to the custodian (wipe off lunch tables), principal (clean playground or hallways), Kindergarten teacher (help younger children get on outdoor clothing before recess). Writing to the fire department or police department would also help in acquainting students with their community.

    Anticipatory Set:

    Tell students to close their eyes and imagine someone who is talented. Then have them open their eyes and, one by one, name the person they imagined. See if students named themselves or others. Remind them that each of them is talented, as they discovered in the last two lessons.

  2. Write the word "philanthropy" on the board. Ask the students what it means. Define "philanthropy" as the giving of one's time, talent, or treasure for the sake of another - or for the common good. (Robert Payton). Ask students to explain this in their own words. Allow for many examples, then clarify as needed.
  3. Remind students that they have recently been discussing their talents and how we can use them to help others. Ask them if they think they could be philanthropists. ·
  4. Ask students to think of people or groups that might benefit from their talents. These could be people in the school community or the city/town. Record the ideas as the children brainstorm. After a thorough list has been compiled, ask the students how they could find out if there are people who would appreciate their talents.
  5. Conclude that we should ask them. We could do this by writing letters or by calling them. Teacher's Note: The age group with which you are working would determine this. Writing individual letters might be too difficult for students in kindergarten or first grade; however, a class letter could be drafted and copied by the teacher.
  6. If the students are going to write the letters, teach the basics of letter writing. The class should work together to write a sample form letter that could be copied by each student, but mailed to different groups. The list should also be narrowed down so that it would be possible to actually provide the services that the letters might generate. These services could be carried out over the course of the school year.
Assessment 
Teacher observation of student participation in the discussions, brainstorming activity, and letter writing. If the students are writing their own letters, a scoring guide such as the one below could be used. Points Scoring Rubric 3 Letter completely copied and neatly written so that individual letters are formed and spaced correctly. 2 Letter completely copied and neatly written so that individual letters are formed correctly, but not spaced correctly. 2 Letter completely copied and neatly written so that individual letters are spaced correctly, but not formed correctly. 2 Letter not completely copied, but neatly written so that individual letters are spaced and formed correctly. 1 Letter not completely copied, but neatly written so that individual letters are spaced correctly, but not formed correctly. 0 Letter not completely copied and not written neatly.
Cross Curriculum 
The students will write letters to different groups in order to assess their needs. (The teacher may choose to do this through phone calls.)

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.I Definitions of Philanthropy
    1. Standard DP 01. Define Philanthropy
      1. Benchmark E.1 Define philanthropy as the giving and sharing of time, talent, or treasure intended for the common good.
  2. Strand PHIL.II Philanthropy and Civil Society
    1. Standard PCS 07. Skills of Civic Engagement
      1. Benchmark E.3 Participate in acts of democratic citizenship in the classroom or school, such as voting, group problem solving, classroom governance or elections.