Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement

Towards a Definition (Private-Religious)
Lesson 1
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Lesson
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Academic Standards
Philanthropy Framework

Purpose:

Learners will define the term tolerance and examine their reactions to given social situations that call for tolerance.

Duration:

One - Fifty Minute Class Period

Objectives:

The learner will:

  • define tolerance – (v) to recognize and respect the opinions and rights of others.
  • identify tolerance skills/characteristics (i.e. knowledge, listening, education, patience, care, understanding, compassion, objectivity, etc.).
  • compare and contrast different situations where tolerance is essential or unnecessary and explain why.
  • identify areas in which tolerance and/or intolerance is being/has been demonstrated in their own life. 

Materials:

  • Attachment One:Tolerance Scenarios
  • Attachment Two:Tolerance Worksheet
Handout 1
Tolerance Scenarios
Handout 2
Tolerance Worksheet

Instructional Procedure(s):

Anticipatory Set:
Have the learners share what they know about tolerance and write their ideas on the display board. Share the definition of tolerance-(v) to recognize and respect the opinions and rights of others. Have them identify some of the skills needed to promote attitudes/characteristics of tolerance (i.e. i.e. knowledge, listening, education, patience, care, understanding, compassion, objectivity, etc.) Have them share examples or experiences of tolerance or intolerance that they are have encountered in their own lives and their reactions to and feelings about these examples or experiences.

 

  • Distribute copies of Attachment One: Tolerance Scenarios As a total group, have the learners read and share what they would do in the first two scenario situations and why each of these scenario situations might require or not require a tolerant mindset.

  • Then divide the class into smaller groups. Appoint one leader for each group.

  • Have each learner silently read the remaining three tolerance scenarios and instruct the leader to facilitate a discussion in the group concerning each of these three tolerance scenarios. Remind the leaders to be sure that as a group, they are to decide if each of these scenario situations might require or not require a tolerant mindset and be able to provide a rationale for their decision.

  • Following the discussion have each group, by consensus; fill out the Attachment Two: Tolerance Worksheet

  • Reconvene the total class have each group share and discuss the results of their worksheet, being sure that they respond to the following:
    1. What is tolerance? (i.e. to recognize and respect the opinions and rights of others.)
    2. What are the parameters of tolerance? What can be tolerated and what cannot?  (i.e. being able to tolerate a different view unless it violates law, ethical belief, something that makes me uncomfortable)
    3. Who decides this? Society? Individuals? Religion? Other?
    4. How do these examples differ?
    5. In what ways might people interpret these tolerance scenarios differently?

  • Conclude this lesson by asking the learners to share how it might be possible for people to interpret these tolerance scenarios differently and why ones ethical and/or religious beliefs are helpful in defining what is to be tolerated and what is not to be tolerated.

Assessment:

Learner involvement in class and small group discussion as well as the successful completion of the small group Tolerance Worksheet form the basis of assessment of this lesson. 

School/Home Connection:

This lesson asks the learners to give examples or experiences of tolerance/intolerance from their own life. As a homework assignment, have the learners interview family members asking them to share examples or experiences of tolerance/intolerance from their own lives and the impact that they have had socially as well as emotionally. Have the learners write and hand in one or two of these shared examples or experiences.

Lesson Developed By:

Avital Weisbrod
Areyvut
http://www.areyvut.org
Bergenfield, NJ 07621

Handouts:

Handout 1Print Handout 1

Tolerance Scenarios

  1. A boy from your summer camp who really bothers you and who is slightly dorky and is a little socially awkward invites you to his house to see his insect collection. What do you think? What do you say?  What do you do?


  2. Because the new student to your school is of a different social and economic background than theirs, many of your friends are have decided to not to include him in the Homecoming festivities. What do you think? What do you say?  What do you do?


  3. You’ve traveled across the country to visit some of your friends you met at camp. They are having a party on Saturday night and you know there will be drinking and drugs there. What do you think? What do you say?  What do you do?


  4. You are vehemently opposed to abortion and you believe it is murder. Your best friend was raped and she is depressed and suicidal. She is looking into having an abortion. What do you think? What do you say?  What do you do?


  5. Your friend is a devout Xacaa (a made-up religion that has been around for centuries).Xacaas are cannibals who eat live babies when the moon is full because their religious leader Zorracaa commanded it and because those who do not eat are considered sinners. Your friend would like you to participate in this highly religious ritual. On one hand this really disturbs you and on the other, this is a religion that has been here for centuries. What do you think? What do you say?  What do you do?

Handout 2Print Handout 2

Tolerance Worksheet

Participants___________________________________________________________________

 

 

Reaction: What do you think? What do you say? What do you do?

Skills required: (i.e. knowledge, listening, education, patience, care, understanding, compassion, objectivity, etc.

Is it important to be tolerant of this situation? Why or why not?

Scenario One:
Awkward boy
     
ScenarioTwo:      
New Student
     
Scenario Three:
Drinking and Drug Party
     
Scenario Four:
Abortion
     
Scenario Five:
Xacaa
     

Philanthropy Framework:

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