Strand
PHIL.III
Philanthropy and the Individual
Index: 
3
Code: 
PI

Our communities may have people from many cultures and there may be many different languages spoken. Sparked by a playful video of kids teaching other kids their languages, we explore the languages represented in our communities. 

Why do we have cultural recognition months? The U.S. calendar of holidays includes months like National Hispanic Heritage Month and National Women's History Month in recognition of groups that have been historically underrepresented in the U.S. This lesson explores why and how we put these spotlights on specific months. 

In this lesson, youth become aware and gain empathy for the discrimination people experience because of their race, age, gender, and other reasons. The group discusses ways to be inclusive. A Mix it Up Day changes our familiar boundaries and helps us connect to new people.

What does it mean to live philanthropically with our “treasure”?  In what ways do we impact nature through purchasing decisions? Participants will develop their understanding of philanthropy and corporate social responsibility.  Through researching the ways companies engage in corporate social responsibility, participants explore the impact of individuals making purchasing choices based on environmental sustainability and ethics.

Through analyzing a Ted Talk by Robin Wall Kimmerer, participants develop their understanding of what it means to respond with gratitude to the gifts from the Earth. Participants expand their awareness of the interdependent relationship between humans and nature. Kimmerer motivates and inspires us to be grateful recipients of Earth's gifts.

This secondary lesson explains what the U.S. Census is and why it is important for everyone. Every ten years, we count everyone who is living in the U.S., from babies to the oldest people. This gives our government a clear idea of who is using services and where we have growth or decrease in population. If we know who lives where, we can make sure to provide services, such as education, health care, public services, and food/housing in the needed places. 

This lesson explains what the Census is and why it is important for everyone. Every ten years, we count everyone who is living in the U.S., from babies to the oldest people. This gives our government a clear idea of who lives where and regions where we have growth or decrease in population. If we know who lives where, we can make sure to provide services, such as education, health care, public services, and food/housing in the needed places. 

In response to a read-aloud story about improving a community with individual gifts of time and talent, students explore talents and interests of their own and others. They practice listening and responding with respect. They raise awareness through volunteering of the benefit to communities of a variety of contributions. Everyone has something to give, and this lesson helps us respect and celebrate the contributions we all can make. Students internalize "I matter in my communities." 

In response to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s challenge to be the best with the talents you have, students explore talents and interests of their own and others. They practice listening and responding with respect. They raise awareness through volunteering of the benefit to communities of a variety of contributions. Everyone has something to give, and this lesson helps us respect and celebrate the contributions we all can make. Students internalize "I matter in my communities." 

Building a caring and inclusive classroom begins with an understanding of where students are at not just academically, but emotionally. Many students today have been exposed to adverse childhood experiences that affect their ability to regulate their emotions. By teaching children positive behavior and self-regulation, teachers can help improve outcomes for all students. This lesson will introduce students to mindful activities and the use of gratitude journals.

Pages