Youth Make a Difference!

Youth Make a Difference!

Learning to Give equips young people of all ages with philanthropy tools and knowledge as they discover what they care about and take action with their time, talent, and treasure. 

Racial Equity Resources

Logo Red

#F05546
Racial Equity Resources

Spark conversations about ways people can take action for a more racially equitable society with this timeline of the History of U.S. Philanthropy. Created for the National Day of Racial Healing, these guides help youth reflect on the role of justice and equity in conversations and actions. For Black History Month, the Learning to Give lessons linked below spark youth action and reflection.

Currently Featured

  • Unit: 
    Black History IS American History
    Grades 
    K
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    12

    We are made by history. In this activity, youth read the stories of philanthropic African Americans and influential related events that made America what it is today. Then they create a virtual Pop-Up Museum as an advocacy service project in which they tell stories of Black history and philanthropy.

  • Unit: 
    Exploring the Timeline of US Philanthropy
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    12

    With similar motivations to present-day refugees, African Americans moved north in the mid-1800s to escape slavery and unsafe living conditions in the South. Detroit was an important location where Conductors on the Underground Railroad helped thousands to cross the Detroit River into Canada.

  • Unit: 
    Exploring the Timeline of US Philanthropy
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    12

    The Free Breakfast for Children Program of the 1960s exemplified mutual aid and differed from traditional charity while still being a form of philanthropy.

  • Unit: 
    Cultural Competence
    Grades 
    K
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8

    The key to cultural competence is learning about cultures around the world. The book Children Like Me sparks curiosity about different cultures.

  • Unit: 
    TeachOne: King's Words of Challenge
    Grades 
    K
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5

    Learners make a talent chain for the group. This is a representation of the many strengths and talents each learner brings, making the whole group strong.

  • Unit: 
    TeachOne: King's Words of Challenge
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    12

    In response to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s challenge, we explore what it means to be the best with the talents you have. The learners practice listening and responding with respect.

  • Unit: 
    Grow Involved 9-12
    Grades 
    9
    10
    11
    12

    Young people discuss the need for and examples of nonviolent conflict resolution. They promote the idea of taking action for change by organizing a rally for nonviolence. 

  • Unit: 
    Grow Involved 6-8
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8

    Young people will compare and contrast the philosophies and work of Dr. King and Gandhi. They will determine a service they can provide to promote peace and nonviolence.

  • Unit: 
    Taking a Stand for Good
    Grades 
    9
    10
    11
    12

    Youth read about Rosa Parks and evaluate how her protest of an unjust situation was philanthropic in nature.

  • Unit: 
    Character Education: Fairness (Grade 8)
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8

    Learners compare the meaning of justice with fairness and distinguish the meanings of fair, just, equal, and equitable. They write a definition for each term and display it on the wall for the duration of the unit.

  • Unit: 
    My Country, My Community
    Grades 
    9
    10
    11
    12

    In a persuasive essay, learners describe the responsibilities of American citizenship and the cost of freedom. They connect how philanthropic action is a part of those costs. “Freedom isn’t free. It passes on an enormous debt to the recipient.”

  • Unit: 
    Challenging Social Boundaries
    Grades 
    9
    10
    11
    12

    From history we know that working in community (not on our own) is the best way to make change. Young people explore the work of nonprofits related to equity and social justice. 

EVERYONE has something to give!

EVERYONE has something to give!
guide youth philanthropy
empower civic engagement
nurture trust and belonging