Infuse giving into academics

Infuse giving into academics
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Why Do We Have a Census?

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Why Do We Have a Census?

These elementary and secondary lesson plans give background on the census and explore its value to the public, and its impact on services of the government and nonprofit sectors. 

Students may choose to communicate with others about the importance of counting each person in order to encourage everyone to complete the form. They may share on social media or in person what they have learned and why it is important to count everyone. 

Lesson for grades K-5 and lesson for grades 6-12


Connect what you're already teaching to issues kids care about

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This is Philanthropy and Service

Connect what you're already teaching to issues kids care about

You don’t have to adopt a new curriculum. Learning to Give's standards-aligned lessons inspire students to use their hearts and minds to impact their community and themselves.

Currently Featured

  • Unit: 
    Why Do We Have a Census?
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    12

    This secondary lesson explains what the U.S. Census is and why it is important for everyone. Every ten years, we count everyone who is living in the U.S., from babies to the oldest people.

  • Unit: 
    Why Do We Have a Census?
    Grades 
    K
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5

    This lesson explains what the Census is and why it is important for everyone. Every ten years, we count everyone who is living in the U.S., from babies to the oldest people. This gives our government a clear idea of who lives where and regions where we have growth or decrease in population.

  • Look here each day for lesson plans to link learning to generosity in this time of uncertainty. Simply teach one lesson to provide knowledge, skills, and action of philanthropy. These learning activities provide great conversation starters for you and your family about our roles in civil society. 

  • Unit: 
    TeachOne: Coming Together for Environmental Action
    Grades 
    K
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5

    Students listen and respond to a read-aloud book about making a shared space better. They walk around their school grounds observing plants, use of space, and ways to make the shared space better.

  • Unit: 
    TeachOne: Coming Together for Environmental Action
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    12

    Students consider diverse perspectives as they advocate for stewardship. They audit the building grounds by looking around for plaes that need extra attention and stewardship. When they find a spot to care for, they must find out who the stakeholders are and interview them.

  • Grade Levels: 
    K
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5

    It this unit of three lessons, we build a caring classroom culture using literature and movie clips to spark discussions. In lesson one students learn about mindfulness and gratitude to reduce anxiety. In lesson two, they learn how to listen, act, and show empathy in difficult situations.

  • Unit: 
    Art as Advocacy
    Grades 
    9
    10
    11
    12

    The learners will view works of art that advocate for social change. They will recognize that art can influence social change. The learners will select an issue of human rights and create a work of art that represents the issue.

  • Unit: 
    What Goes Around, Comes Around!
    Grades 
    3
    4
    5

    The purpose of this lesson is to explore the contributions artists make for the common good. We learn how their work is supported by philanthropy and nonproft organizations that assure we have access to art.

  • Unit: 
    Powerful Words Can Warm the Heart
    Grades 
    3
    4
    5

    The purpose of this lesson is to show that artists are a valuable part of a community and to explore how they contribute to the public good.

  • Unit: 
    Poetry for the Common Good
    Grades 
    K
    1
    2

    Students will understand that you find poetry everywhere: lyrics to songs, commercials and rap. They will also realize that themes of giving are often found in poetry. Students will write poems with giving themes. Sharing their poems is considered an act of generosity.

  • Unit: 
    Painting Pictures with Poetry: Art from the Heart
    Grades 
    6
    7
    8

    Students will find and discuss examples of philanthropy in poems and quotations. They will define and design statements on the theme of philanthropy using the poetic conventions of metaphor, simile, and personification.

Current Events

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Current Events

Lots of information is being zipped around at lightning speed by social media, and a lot of it is misleading or inaccurate. The coronavirus has started an "infodemic" that fuels panic and further problems. When discussing the new information, stick to the facts about what is new and what we can do. Always go back to the World Health Organization or the federal government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the best information. Your community government and nonprofits have the common good in mind, so if they tell you to wash your hands or stay home, it is essential for you to trust and follow directions. If your friend or uncle tells you something different and you feel confused, go to the trustworthy source to confirm the best information as it comes out. 

Civics Lesson: The government and healthcare industries are watching the progression of this new coronavirus very carefully, and they have the wellbeing of the community, state, and country as first priority. You can trust their information and recommendations. This is part of the responsibility of the government and nonprofit sectors. 

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help improve student attitudes and school culture
empower students to see their value to society
increase student empathy and respect