Protecting and preserving our natural resources is one of the responsibilities of an American citizen. This concept is defined in a way that children can relate it to their own lives. Ways in which children can help to protect and conserve our natural resources are explored.

Students will be exposed to literature that illustrates how responsible citizens treat others and work toward resolving conflicts within the boundaries of democratic procedures.

The Bill of Rights consists of ten amendments to the Constitution. It spells out rights for all United States citizens. The language in the Bill of Rights is difficult for primary students, so this lesson introduces some simple rights and expectations of all Americans. 

Students will be exposed to literature that illustrates the concept that natural and human characteristics can be expressions of cultural uniqueness. This book also illustrates that although we have differences, we are also very similar. Dwelling on differences can cause unnecessary conflict.

This lesson introduces the concept of sharing and its relationship to a harmonious society. It also introduces good citizenship as learning how to solve problems, increases listening comprehension and use of critical thinking skills.

Americans not only have rights as citizens but also responsibilities. It is important for children to learn about these responsibilities at an early age. Students will be able to get along better in their classroom, neighborhood and community if they do their duty as good citizens.

Students will hear a story that illustrates how a young African-American girl is encouraged by her family to be anything that she wants to be regardless of how her classmates discourage her from trying out for a part in a play.

The students participate in a shared-reading experience of the literature book, The Little Red Hen. This story illustrates how a variety of social behaviors affect the well-being of others in a group. After reading, students discuss the behaviors and the impact of the behaviors on others. Students also describe the resources necessary to produce bread.

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