Steps to Responsibility

Grades: 
6, 7, 8

Though a scenario, students examine the steps of decision-making in taking responsibility.

Lesson Rating 
0
Duration 
PrintOne 20-minute lesson
Objectives 

The learner will:

  • decide what action to take in response to a scenario.
  • analyze the steps of decision-making in a scenario of someone taking active responsibility.
  • write in a journal the steps of decision-making in a personal act of responsibility.
Materials 
  • Flip chart or board
  • Chart from Lesson One

Instructions

Print
  1. Note: Post the chart created in the previous lesson (Assumed-Reminded responsibilities).

    Anticipatory Set:

    Image you are walking to the ice-cream shop to meet friends. As you're waiting at an intersection for the traffic to clear so that you can cross the street, suddenly, out of nowhere, a ball rolls into the street and you hear a group of young children running toward the ball. What do you do? (Ask several students to respond to the question, always following with the question, "what makes you say that?", to invite the students to take their thinking deeper.) Write some of their possible actions/responses on the board. Allow 5 minutes.

  2. Choose one of the possible responses quickly noted on the board. (Use the response that will create the richest discussion.) Tell the students they are going totake apart this response and list the steps involved in taking that action. Brainstorm the steps involved in taking the chosen action. (Encourage the students to think of every step and choice in taking active responsibility for the children about to run into the busy street.) Allow 12 minutes.

    • Sample list of steps toward taking responsibility:
      1. Seeing the situation
      2. Considering what to do/thinking of different options
      3. Weighing the options (determining opportunity costs)
      4. Deciding/knowing what should be done
      5. Choosing to do it
      6. Carrying out the responsibility (following through)
      7. Accepting the consequences of choice and action
  3. Teacher: Now, let's look at the list of our responsibilties from yesterday. Choose one responsibility you have. Refer to the list we just made and break down your responsibility into a similar set of steps that lead to you taking responsibility. Note which of these steps do not fit with your personal responsibility and which ones do. You do not have to share this list. Allow 3 minutes.

  4. Teacher: Now, let's look at the list of our responsibilties from yesterday. Choose one responsibility you have. Refer to the list we just made and break down your responsibility into a similar set of steps that lead to you taking responsibility. Note which of these steps do not fit with your personal responsibility and which ones do. You do not have to share this list. Allow 3 minutes.

Cross Curriculum 

This character education mini-lesson is not intended to be a service learning lesson or to meet the K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice. The character education units will be most effective when taught in conjunction with a student-designed service project that provides a real world setting in which students can develop and practice good character and leadership skills. For ideas and suggestions for organizing service events go to www.generationon.org.

Philanthropy Framework

  1. Strand PHIL.I Definitions of Philanthropy
    1. Standard DP 01. Define Philanthropy
      1. Benchmark MS.4 Give examples of how individuals have helped others.
  2. Strand PHIL.II Philanthropy and Civil Society
    1. Standard PCS 01. Self, citizenship, and society
      1. Benchmark MS.2 Discuss why some animals and humans will sacrifice for the benefit of unknown others.
  3. Strand PHIL.III Philanthropy and the Individual
    1. Standard PI 01. Reasons for Individual Philanthropy
      1. Benchmark MS.1 Define and give examples of the motivations for giving and serving.
      2. Benchmark MS.4 Identify and describe the actions of how citizens act for the common good.
      3. Benchmark MS.5 Describe the responsibility students have to act in the civil society sector to improve the common good.
      4. Benchmark MS.7 Identify and give examples of an individual's reserved power to act.