The learners will investigate the roles of contemporary and historic Latino philanthropists. They will look at a creative approach to "capacity building" in Latino organizations as created by the 2003 winners of the Robert W. Scrivner Award for Creative Grantmaking: Aida Rodriguez, Barbara A. Taveras, Luz A. Vega-Marquis, and Magui Rubalcava, and by looking at the work of César Chávez and Dolores Huerta in the farm labor movement within the historical context of Latino activism in the United States.

Participants research leaders who used the nonprofit sector as an alternative power structure to make positive changes in society. They will identify the Core Democratic Values that each leader focused on.

Youth will interact with older citizens in order to make intergenerational connections in the community, discover the wealth of history around us, and develop pride in and a sense of connection to their community.

After researching the life and work of a chosen philanthropist from history, the learner takes on the role of that philanthropist in writing a letter back to the learner. In this letter, the philanthropist shares their motivations and feelings about their work, and compares and contrasts their work with the philanthropic work of the learner. 

Learners recognize that our valuable natural resources are maintained and cared for by government, business, nonprofits, and individuals. The three sectors (and individuals) work together to accomplish what any one of them cannot do alone.

Pages