This culminating activity gives students an opportunity to teach about our land to others. They spread the word that "commons" are needed, and that when people work together nothing is impossible.

The purpose of this lesson is to engage students in a problem-solving task when there is a scarcity of materials. They collaborate kindly and share their message with others through art and a written statement.

The students learn the difference between public and private, and categorize a list of places as public or private. They determine what is their responsibility to care for public (common) areas and share their new understanding by making posters about taking care of "common" or public areas in the school.

The children define philanthropy and have the opportunity to see they can participate in philanthropy. The memory-building game stimulates the children to choose many different ways of being philanthropic to improve their community.

Motivated by the song "This Land is Your Land," learners locate areas on a U.S. map and discuss the definitions of community, philanthropy, and volunteer. They picture themselves as volunteers, helping others.

This lesson will allow students to explore the family or household unit, of which they are an essential member, as a community. As a class, they will create a Family Album using all of the family pictures brought in by the students. This will allow them to see the number of people the class represents in the community.

This lesson will help students recognize heroes within their community. Children quite often revere sports stars and celebrities. But most real heroes are not people of great renown. They live near us. By performing small acts, they win our admiration. Since children imitate what they see and hear, it is important to point out to them what actions merit honor and which individuals deserve admiration.

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