This secondary lesson explains what the U.S. Census is and why it is important for everyone. Every ten years, we count everyone who is living in the U.S., from babies to the oldest people. This gives our government a clear idea of who is using services and where we have growth or decrease in population. If we know who lives where, we can make sure to provide services, such as education, health care, public services, and food/housing in the needed places. 

Students consider diverse perspectives as they advocate for stewardship. They audit the building grounds by looking around for plaes that need extra attention and stewardship. When they find a spot to care for, they must find out who the stakeholders are and interview them. Listening to different perspectives before making a plan of action shows respect and inclusiveness.

In response to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s challenge to a middle school to spark discussions and action of personal action, in this lesson we explore what it means to be the best with the talents you have. Students practice listening and responding with respect. They raise awareness through volunteering of the benefit to communities of a variety of contributions. Everyone has something to give, and this lesson helps us respect and celebrate the contributions we all can make to peaceful and inclusive communities. Students internalize "I matter in my communities." 

In this lesson, students learn that we all have ideas and talents to make the world a better place. This is an opportunity to demonstrate and feel the impact of kindness, inclusion, and listening on a caring community. Students learn from a community helper about the needs they observe in the community. They make and donate a "calming kit" so the tool may help youth calm themselves. Use this at the beginning of the year to set a tone and learn skills of effective language that are good for all. 

Students organize and implement a school-based recycling plan based on research and interests of the group.

This adaptable one-period lesson plan includes a simple and powerful service project for Earth Day. The reflection brings learning and service impact together. 

Students explore the roles of bees in a hive and as pollinators. They learn about reasons their population numbers have been declining in recent years. The design a project to help beautify their school and help the larger environment by attracting bees. They may write a letter or create a handout to teach others how to help bees through planting native species.

This lesson focuses on the meaning and benefits of gratitude. Students research one aspect of gratitude in order to understand its relationship to health, happiness, or generosity. For their service project, students will decide how they can 'deliver gratitude' to a deserving person or group. They will then complete a service such as writing thank you notes. 

In an effort to strengthen the notion that individual voluntary action can have a significant impact, students will create books where one key historical figure's actions turn from philanthropic to selfish. They will imagine what the world would be like in the absence of great deeds of generosity and character. The students illustrate with their imagination and words the impact of character and philanthropy to make a difference.

Pages