Standard
PCS 06.
Philanthropy in History
Index: 
6

This secondary lesson explains what the U.S. Census is and why it is important for everyone. Every ten years, we count everyone who is living in the U.S., from babies to the oldest people. This gives our government a clear idea of who is using services and where we have growth or decrease in population. If we know who lives where, we can make sure to provide services, such as education, health care, public services, and food/housing in the needed places. 

In response to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s challenge, we explore what it means to be the best with the talents you have. Students practice listening and responding with respect. They raise awareness through volunteering of the benefit to communities of a variety of contributions. Everyone has something to give, and this lesson helps us respect and celebrate the contributions we all can make to peaceful and inclusive communities. Students internalize "I matter in my communities." 

In an effort to strengthen the notion that individual voluntary action can have a significant impact, students will create books where one key historical figure's actions turn from philanthropic to selfish. They will imagine what the world would be like in the absence of great deeds of generosity and character. The students illustrate with their imagination and words the impact of character and philanthropy to make a difference.

Students explore the components of the Preamble of the U.S.  Constitution and apply them to their own lives, with a particular emphasis on philanthropy. This lesson is designed for Citizenship/Constitution Day (September 17) and connects students to the community-building focus of the Constitution and how it relates personally to their lives and action. 

Students identify key events in U.S. history and the magnitude of the Constitution in context, with a particular emphasis on philanthropy. This lesson is designed for Citizenship/Constitution Day (September 17) and connects students to the historical significance of the Constitution and how it relates personally to their lives and action. 

We are made by history. In this activity youth read the stories of philanthropic African Americans and influential related events that made America what it is today. Then they create a virtual Pop-Up Museum as an advocacy service project in which they tell stories of Black history and philanthropy.

Students learn about the goals of Earth Day and identify areas in town that need clean-up or planting. They plan a day of service.

Teach this one-period lesson plan and follow it with a simple and powerful service project before or on Earth Day. The reflection brings learning and service impact together. 

Students follow the example of philanthropists who impacted their community by cooperating rather than competing. Students identify their own giving passions and cooperate with each other and a community organization to plan a project. Examples of "cooperative philanthropists" are taken from the Our State of Generosity website. 

Enjoy the study of historical figures and how they positively contributed to society by sharing research in an enticing and fun way -- a "traveling wax museum of famous philanthropists." The students research the significance and contributions of a selected famous person and develop a costume to represent their chosen person. The lesson ends with a presentation before a school assembly where the students describe the famous person and the contributions he/she made to the world.

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