Students design a plan to make themselves and their school community healthier. They brainstorm what it means to get moving and exercise, and they see that increasing physical fitness activity is good for everyone and brings a community together. Students will choose or design a service project to encourage schoolmates and the community to increase their daily fitness activity.

Youth Activity: Students brainstorm time, talent, and treasure examples that they have to offer/give. The activity will ask each person to think of some ways he/she can generate money. 

“You should never think that just because you’re a kid you can’t do something.”

~ Max Penning, 12 years old, 1999 Prudential Spirit of Community Award Honoree, sold 2000 pizzas 

Youth Activity: Participants will gain a greater understanding of the meaning of philanthropy, and identify at least one action that they can take to better their own community. They will investigate the strength of the human spirit and its importance in making the world better. See the handout for supplemental faith-based discussion questions. Religious perspective attached.

“I keep my ideals, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.” ~ Anne Frank (1930-1944)

Youth Activity: Participants identify and begin to integrate the meaning of the word philanthropy and associated philanthropic acts. This activity assumes that the young people have had prior discussions about philanthropy. See the handout for supplemental faith-based discussion questions.

“If every American donated five hours a week, it would equal the labor of 20 million full-time volunteers” ~ Whoopi Goldberg

Youth Activity: Participants will know the definition of philanthropy, and be able to recognize philanthropic traits and actions. See the handout for supplemental faith-based discussion questions.

“Say it again! Say it loud! Philanthropy makes me proud!” ~ Janet Wakefield

Youth Activity: Participants create a collage depicting philanthropic traits and actions. This collage serves as a visual definition of philanthropy. See the handout for supplemental faith-based discussion questions.

“The future depends entirely on what each of us does every day.” ~Gloria Steinem

 

Youth Activity: Participants recognize a wide variety of philanthropic actions through fun and active participation. See the handout for supplemental faith-based discussion questions.

"If every American donated five hours a week, it would equal the labor of 20 million full-time volunteers." ~Whoopi Goldberg

Students bring together their investigations of different preschool and early childhood centers and share their research on literacy and faith development and come to a consensus on the plan for their devotional project. They examine sample devotionals and brainstorm their topics and theme ideas. Students complete pre-writing activities and collaboration before starting their first drafts.

In this two-session lesson, students explore the concept of philanthropy and brainstorm how they can use (and develop) their English Language Arts talents to create faith-based devotionals for younger children. 

In this lesson, students explore the issue of food insecurity in their community. Using the table as a theme, students design and carry out a service-learning project that addresses the issue of child hunger in the United States. They bring their time, talent, and treasure to the table.

Focus Question: What can we do to address the issue of child hunger in our community?

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