Unit Overview 

Understanding the watershed and its potential threats engages students in critical thinking about their responsibility for direct action or advocacy. They may take action through the political process by contacting local governmental agencies (DNR, contact state or U.S. Representatives) or by writing letters to the editor of a local newspaper concerning protecting their watershed.  

Service Experience 
Have the learners conduct a survey of their community to determine the conditions of a local water supply. The water supply can be as simple as a small stream near the school or a local park. Learners will create a list of environmental problems associated with the body of water and then develop a plan to clean the area. Learners should create a letter to a local governmental agency asking for help and advice about the project. If possible learners will plan an “action” day to go to the water source and clean the area.
Lessons in This Unit 
Unit: 
Watershed S.O.S. (Saving Our Sources) 6-8
Lesson 2 of 3
Grades: 
6
7
8

The purpose of the lesson is to educate learners about watersheds, ways in which water pollution occurs, and how important proper use of watersheds is to them.  After understanding the importance of the watersheds, they will recognize that wise usage of their local watershed is an example of stewardship.

Unit: 
Watershed S.O.S. (Saving Our Sources) 6-8
Lesson 3 of 3
Grades: 
6
7
8

The purpose of the lesson is to teach the difference between myth and reality and that stewardship of the Earth’s resources is the responsibility of everyone. The learners will also use the information used in the watershed unit to write a letter supporting stewardship of water because it is a nonrenewable resource.